One website with several different products & services or multiple websites?

18 replies
My products and services are kind of in the same niche. This is why I created a website which contains everything: http://www.deeptenger.com/

But, I am not sure if this was a good idea? I wonder if I should have several unique sales pages instead, each with a different domain?

I am not a SEO expert, but I think it might be easier to rank for a bigger site with more content than a single sales page. But, in my case, more content could mean more confusion. I received an email recently from a potential client. After he looked at my site, he said: "I don't quite understand what it is you do you seem to do everything. Can you explain?"

I am interested in your opinion or recommendation.

Thanks.
#multiple #products #services #website #websites
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  • Profile picture of the author SARubin
    Originally Posted by Joe Ray View Post

    My products and services are kind of in the same niche. This is why I created a website which contains everything: Deep Tenger Venture Studio - DTVS | Data Science & AI Technology

    But, I am not sure if this was a good idea? I wonder if I should have several unique sales pages instead, each with a different domain?

    I am not a SEO expert, but I think it might be easier to rank for a bigger site with more content than a single sales page. But, in my case, more content could mean more confusion. I received an email recently from a potential client. After he looked at my site, he said: "I don't quite understand what it is you do you seem to do everything. Can you explain?"

    I am interested in your opinion or recommendation.

    Thanks.
    Well Joe,
    Here's my honest recommendation for you. ..

    Listen to what your potential client is saying (I mean, actually pay attention to the insight he's given you) Because I find myself agreeing with him.


    I just looked at your website, and I don't think the main confusion is with you offering too much. I believe it lies more with your copy not clearly communicating the benefits of your software, to potential clients.

    Now, I don't know who your primary market is. But after looking at your website, it appears that it's business owners, or business marketing departments? So with that in mind, here's my take on your sales message...


    Starting with the header pictures on your homepage (and title slogans within the pictures)

    They are eye catching (which is good) but they don't tell me what it is that you do, and more importantly, what you're going to do for me (they offer no benefit of any kind)

    So there's a bit of wasted real estate, right from the start


    Then, your website copy is full of technical jargon... insider buzz language... and cliches'

    Here's a copied, and pasted example right from your homepage...



    Who are We?
    Deep Tenger Venture Studio Ltd. (DTVS)

    At DTVS, we are the leading software development house who has specialized in the application of Deep Learning and Artificial Intelligence (AI) in developing novel solutions for supporting decision-making and solving critical business problems.

    In its application, artificial intelligence refers to the application and development of software which solve real-world -- and typically business-related -- problems. This is a branch of computer science which is dedicated towards development of machine learning models which mimic intelligent human behavior.

    We can help our clients either with "data products" or "decision sciences", depending on the problem they need to solve. read more...





    As a visitor to your site, and a potential client, all I can say is...

    "What the hell are you talking about? And, what the hell is any of that going to do for me and my business?"


    Honestly, if you were writing a technical white paper... then your copy looks OK.

    But for sales copy... not so much.


    Then your inner pages are full of more catch phrase jargon, and vague technical references to what your software does.

    I'm sure it all makes perfect sense to you, and I even understand much of it myself... But it does not make for good sales copy to an average business owner who is not in the AI tech industry.


    Again, I don't know whom your primary market is. So if you're showing this to a jargon inclined corporate manager, then this type of copy might just get you a meeting with the C-suite executives.

    But if you want to sell this to regular businesses, we need to turn your copy into regular language that clearly talks to your audience, about what your software is going to do for them, to improve their business.


    I realize you are a brilliant software developer, Joe, and not a sales copywriter. So you may want to partner up with a saleswriter, or outsource that part of your website copy to someone who can turn your knowledge of features, into tangible benefits, in a way that makes sense to your target audience.


    I can't tell you how to run your business, so this is just a recommendation for you to consider.

    I wish you the best of luck with your venture.

    All the best,
    SAR
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    "It all boils down to psychology, and numbers"
    SARubin - Direct Response Copywriter / Advertising and Marketing Aficionado
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Ray
      Thanks very much SARubin for taking the time to look at my site and post a detailed reply. I appreciate it!

      You pinpointed the problem accurately. You're absolutely right about everything you pointed out.

      Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

      Well Joe,
      As a visitor to your site, and a potential client, all I can say is...

      "What the hell are you talking about? And, what the hell is any of that going to do for me and my business?"
      In fact, this is exactly what's happening. This is why I started this thread. I am trying to find a solution.

      What you read on my website is my third attempt and third copy writer. And, I am still not making sales...
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      • Profile picture of the author SARubin
        Originally Posted by Joe Ray View Post

        Thanks very much SARubin for taking the time to look at my site and post a detailed reply. I appreciate it!

        You pinpointed the problem accurately. You're absolutely right about everything you pointed out.


        In fact, this is exactly what's happening. This is why I started this thread. I am trying to find a solution.

        What you read on my website is my third attempt and third copy writer. And, I am still not making sales...

        OK Joe,

        Let's see what we can do to help you out here. Unfortunately, due to my schedule, I can't give you my undivided attention at the moment. But, maybe with the help of some of the other brilliant minds on this forum, we can collaborate, and get you moving in the right direction...


        Obviously, my original reply was painted with pretty broad strokes. So let's see if we can narrow it down a bit for you. OK?


        Let me start by asking you a couple basic questions (depending on your answers, there might be a follow up question, or two?)


        First, who do you see as your primary (target) market?


        For example... business owners, that operate companies with between $2,000,000 and $10,000,000 in gross revenue? Soloprenuers? Mom and Pop businesses? Fortune 500 companies?

        (I'm not telling you who to choose, I'm just giving you a couple examples here)

        Now, I'd like you to tell me, who your market is (who can benefit the most from your service)...

        The more exact you can get... the better.



        Second, what does your product (or service) actually do for people?


        Does it mine data? Does it organize, and categorize already accumulated data, so it can be understood and utilized? Does it make sense of all those numbers and statistics?

        Again, just trying to get a basic understanding, from your point of view. So we can try to find a hook, and turn it into a benefit for your audience.



        Final question... How are your potential customers finding your website?

        Are you marketing to them, and directing them to visit your website? Are you using SEO for particular keywords (if so, which words are bringing you the most traffic?)? Telemarketing, and sending them to the site? Direct mail? Something else?


        We don't need you to write a novel here, Joe. (After all, this is just a forum)

        But, if you can give a basic idea of what we're dealing with, maybe someone here (maybe even me?) can get you started in a direction, that will resemble compelling sales copy for you, and your website visitors

        Obviously no one is going to write your entire sales page for free, but at least we can show you the difference between "technical copy" and "sales copy."




        P.S. If the third copywriter you hired wrote your current pages, I would suggest that you did not actually hire a "sales copywriter" but you may have hired a "technical writer" presenting themselves as a "copywriter"
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        "It all boils down to psychology, and numbers"
        SARubin - Direct Response Copywriter / Advertising and Marketing Aficionado
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        • Profile picture of the author Joe Ray
          Thanks so much SARubin for doing this. I really appreciate your help.
          Your questions are right on target. I have a hard time answering them, which is probably the root of my problems.

          Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

          First, who do you see as your primary (target) market?
          Answer: I can't define my primary market, or I should say, I can't narrow it down to a specific segment, industry or niche. I can't define it even by the size of an organization at this point.

          Here is the reason why: data science can be useful for just about anyone.
          I mean, from a football team to a movie producer, a political party to a church group, medical research or stock market predictions; from a small restaurant to fortune 500 companies etc...

          It's not so easy to define the target market by company size either; but, I can try to exclude some markets based on size.

          Very big companies have their own in-house data science teams. They will not use our services (but, they might still outsource some of their data science grunt work to us).

          Very small companies or individuals usually don't have the budget for data science services (but, we can do simple, inexpensive software development projects as well...).

          Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

          Second, what does your product (or service) actually do for people?
          I am not trying to dodge this question. But, I have to say, we can pretty much solve any data problem from a simple data cleaning and organizing job to a highly complex Artificial Intelligence systems integration.

          I realize that this might sound arrogant. But, data science is a poorly defined field where the more money you have, the more problems you can solve. Google can solve very complex problems, but, not necessary because they're smarter than everyone else. They can do what they do because they have 60K employees, over 20K of them are in R&D and probably 3K PhDs.

          So, what do we really try to do for people?
          1. We can provide decision science solutions. We can train machines to assist decision makers to make the right decisions.
          2. We can make things that do things. We automate stuff.


          Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

          Final question... How are your potential customers finding your website?
          They're finding our site mainly through direct contact. Mostly, other software engineering companies ask us to solve problems they can't solve.
          We are happy to get any project and we appreciate the business we get from them, but we need to find a way to reach businesses directly, not just the software companies we know.

          As far as SEO, we're not ranking for anything yet. We get very little organic traffic. We get some traffic from our social media efforts and some limited advertising. But, very few conversions so far.

          Again, thanks so much for your willingness to help us out.
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          • Profile picture of the author SARubin
            Originally Posted by Joe Ray View Post

            Answer: I can't define my primary market, or I should say, I can't narrow it down to a specific segment, industry or niche. I can't define it even by the size of an organization at this point.

            Here is the reason why: data science can be useful for just about anyone.
            I mean, from a football team to a movie producer, a political party to a church group, medical research or stock market predictions; from a small restaurant to fortune 500 companies etc...
            Hey Joe, sorry I didn't reply to your post any sooner. I got working on this project I'm on, and before ya know it, a week or more has gone by (thank you adult ADHD)

            So, anyway...

            I think it's pretty much unanimous among the group here, that we really need to tighten up the focus of your market (at least at the beginning stages)

            Steve B, and John McCabe brought it to you from two different angles, but the concept is basically the same...

            Steve touched on starting with one (1) primary core audience, and then expanding outward towards your fringe buyers (some of whom will become your next core audience)

            And John touched on opening with a more general appeal, and then allowing your audience to choose their own path towards a more narrow criteria.


            But the concept is all the same. People are going to buy your software (or not) for their OWN reasons. Not for anyone else's reasons.


            So, we need to target an audience with your marketing, and then send them to a particular message (sales message) that speaks directly to that core audience.

            You don't need to create multiple websites, but multiple webpages (one for each targeted audience) is a good thing. And then either send people directly to that page, from your marketing, or send them to your home page (gateway page) and guide them to the individual pages from there.


            As for the individual sales pages, 1Bryan started to break it down for you with the copy... If you're talking to sports teams, then a sports analogy will get you a whole lot further than using words like "predictive consumer analysis"


            Short example:

            Your next winning season, starts now!

            Imagine... Instead of just studying the other teams players, and watching video clips of past games. You can now use data analytics, to predict exactly what the other team will do in almost any situation.

            With our data analytics platform, you'll be able to make strategic decisions, based on scientifically calculated patterns. And give your players the advantage they need to take you all the way to the big game .



            If your talking to for profit consumer businesses, then we can still use a similar pattern, but instead of sports analogies we could turn it into consumer type language...


            Short example:

            A better understanding of consumers buying habits, will help you make better and more profitable business decisions

            Imagine... Instead of just guessing what your customers want to buy, you can now use data analytics, and deep learning intelligence, to make strategic decisions. And give your customers exactly what they want, when they want it, based on scientifically determined patterns of consumer behavior.


            For church groups, we turn it into religious language. For medical organizations, we use medical terms.

            Are you starting to see where this is going, Joe? Different language resonates with different audiences. But whatever you do... it always needs to speak to THEM, with the language of "what's in it for them."


            On a side note: I'd recommend staying away from the political groups for the time being. At least until this whole Facebook / Analytica scandal works it's way through the current news cycle. (could take weeks... could take months. Depending on what other scandal of the day shows up in the news cycle?)

            Otherwise we might find ourselves spending an inordinate amount of time, and energy, convincing potential clients that they won't end up testifying before congress, or parliament (or whatever government regulated consumer protection panel you guys have in China?) about how all this data is being collected, and used.



            Originally Posted by Joe Ray View Post

            As far as SEO, we're not ranking for anything yet. We get very little organic traffic. We get some traffic from our social media efforts and some limited advertising. But, very few conversions so far.
            There are others who can help you out with SEO, far better than I could.

            But as far as advertising... It's not really rocket science. It mainly comes down to getting the right message, in front of the right audience (at the right time)


            If you just throw out a generic message, to anyone with eyes and ears... your response rate will be minimal, at best. That's basically a "spray and pray" method. You're spraying the market with your message, and praying that it resonates with some people.

            Now, if you have millions of dollars in your advertising budget, then you can certainly start a mass marketing, brand awareness, campaign. And eventually you'll get some business.

            But, if your budget is somewhat more limited, then we need to use a more targeted approach. Which brings us back to narrowing down your initial target audience.


            Pick a primary audience to start with. If you choose small to medium size businesses, then we need to find out what those business leaders are currently concerned with, and how it relates to (or how we can tie it together with) data analytics.

            Here's where you'll want to find a data scraping company that can help you learn the most relevant concerns, that these businesses currently have. (I hear there's a company called Deeptenger that has some pretty good software solutions for this type of data mining?)

            Then we use that data to create a relevant message, and put that message where these business leaders are hanging out.


            Of course, you can simultaneously create more than one campaign, for different audiences. But ideally, you want to create each one separately, and put different messages in front of different audiences.



            Now, before this reply gets too much longer (and becomes a full length novel) I'll just add a couple more tidbits of observation for you...

            I just checked out your ads (from a year, or so, ago) on webmastersun. And I gotta be honest with you, Joe...

            Some of the copy on your ads is better, and more compelling, than the current copy on your website. (less technical jargon... and more benefit driven)


            For your lower priced offers, I would personally lean towards more of that type of copy.

            And if it didn't produce any leads for you in the past, then maybe we should get it in front of a different (or just larger) audience.

            Heck, you've already got the copy... so you might as well test it out in a few more targeted places. And from there, (after a few thousand likely buyers have seen it) we can look at the numbers and decide if it's worth tweaking it, or trying a different approach.


            For your higher ticket offer (the one that's on sale for $7,000... but retails for $50,000) I see you got a couple inquiries on that forum, but I'm guessing it didn't convert too well for you?

            Personally, I'd recommend making that copy a bit more sophisticated, and getting it in front of a different audience. (Instead of just putting it on an open forum, where most people are looking for cheap solutions, for expensive problems)

            A high ticket offer like that would likely do better, placed where more affluent buyers might see it (perhaps the Wall Street Journal, or other business publications) And you'll need to adjust the sales copy accordingly.


            I could go on, but this post is already getting a bit long. So, I'll just leave it here, for now.

            I do have a couple more ideas if you're interested. But they're probably not relevant to anyone else on this forum (besides you) and I don't want to bog down the conversation here any more than I already have. So if you want to PM me, I'd be happy to share my thoughts with you.

            Anyway, I wish you the best of success with your venture.

            All the best,
            SAR
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            "It all boils down to psychology, and numbers"
            SARubin - Direct Response Copywriter / Advertising and Marketing Aficionado
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            • Profile picture of the author Joe Ray
              Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

              Hey Joe, sorry I didn't reply to your post any sooner. I got working on this project I'm on, and before ya know it, a week or more has gone by (thank you adult ADHD)
              Hi SARubin, same here... I apologize for the late reply. I had to deliver a project. I've been fixing "bugs" for the last couple of weeks.

              Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

              As for the individual sales pages, 1Bryan started to break it down for you with the copy... If you're talking to sports teams, then a sports analogy will get you a whole lot further than using words like "predictive consumer analysis

              "Short example:

              Your next winning season, starts now!

              Imagine... Instead of just studying the other teams players, and watching video clips of past games. You can now use data analytics, to predict exactly what the other team will do in almost any situation.

              With our data analytics platform, you'll be able to make strategic decisions, based on scientifically calculated patterns. And give your players the advantage they need to take you all the way to the big game .
              I appreciate your help very much. You're helping me to put things in perspective. It's clear to me now that something like your short example above is exactly what I need.


              Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

              On a side note: I'd recommend staying away from the political groups for the time being. At least until this whole Facebook / Analytica scandal works it's way through the current news cycle. (could take weeks... could take months. Depending on what other scandal of the day shows up in the news cycle?)
              YES! Definitely. I have no intentions of ever doing any data science for any political group .

              Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

              For your higher ticket offer (the one that's on sale for $7,000... but retails for $50,000) I see you got a couple inquiries on that forum, but I'm guessing it didn't convert too well for you?
              It didn't convert at all.

              I have other high ticket offers, like an AI integrated CRM system which would cost $300K to build: AI integrated CRM - Customer Relationship Management - DTVS

              Originally Posted by SARubin View Post

              Personally, I'd recommend making that copy a bit more sophisticated, and getting it in front of a different audience. (Instead of just putting it on an open forum, where most people are looking for cheap solutions, for expensive problems)

              A high ticket offer like that would likely do better, placed where more affluent buyers might see it (perhaps the Wall Street Journal, or other business publications) And you'll need to adjust the sales copy accordingly.
              Yes, you're right. I am trying to do that, but I haven't succeeded yet. I don't have the budget to place expensive ads at this point, so I am trying to "growth-hack" my way through this somehow. But, that's not working so far... Also, it's not so easy to find a writer at a decent price, who can make the sales copy more sophisticated.

              Btw, I have an already developed software product ready for distribution, with a more defined target market.

              This is a machine learning model wrapped in a desktop software which helps advertisers to track the effectiveness of their offline advertisement. I guess, the target market could be defined as "offline advertisers". But, I am still stuck.

              I have a thread about this here on WF: https://www.warriorforum.com/offline...ectivness.html

              You had contributed some very valuable and helpful advise in that tread as well. I am grateful for that.

              I am moving forward slowly, but time is limited in this life, so moving too slow is like not moving at all. And, I am definitely moving too slow.

              I need to have some sort of a a breakthrough.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Joe, I took a look at your site, and my initial reaction was, "that was an excellent example of contemporary corporate techie gibberish."

    The closest you came to plain language was the tag line "we make things that do things."

    As SAR said, unless you are targeting prospects who actually talk like that, you're going to keep getting the reaction you got.

    Basically, you might do well to follow a formula like this:

    > We know you're trying to do this.
    > You might be having problems doing it because of that.
    > We provide a solution to that so you can get back to doing this.

    You do seem to understand the principle, because I found this on your About page:

    We will turn your data into valuable information so you can make optimal business decisions. If you want to build wealth, making the right decisions is imperative to your success.
    That's a benefit. If someone wants that, you now have a basis for explaining how you do that.

    More of that on the home page, and less jargon and corporate-speak, and you'll have much less confusion.

    One last observation -- the comment that you seem to do everything. Yes, you do a lot of different things, but from my understanding, they all stem from your expertise in data mining. Tell people that, and suddenly your multiple offerings make sense.

    Maybe a white paper on how data mining can bring a wide range of benefits might be a way to go.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Ray
      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      Basically, you might do well to follow a formula like this:

      > We know you're trying to do this.
      > You might be having problems doing it because of that.
      > We provide a solution to that so you can get back to doing this.
      Thanks for your reply JohnMcCabe. I appreciate it.

      Your suggested formula makes a lot of sense.

      This basically means that I have to rewrite the whole thing again. I mean, getting an other writer to rewrite it.

      Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

      One last observation -- the comment that you seem to do everything. Yes, you do a lot of different things, but from my understanding, they all stem from your expertise in data mining. Tell people that, and suddenly your multiple offerings make sense.
      Thanks for this advise as well. It's very helpful.
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    Hi Joe,

    Hmmmm...I think you have your answer now buddy

    #1 - The potential client's response: "I don't quite understand what it is you do you seem to do everything. Can you explain?"

    #2 - The fact that you are asking this question with strong doubts.

    Both indicate the next step: do 1 thing, and build 1 website with immense clarity around doing the 1 thing.

    This is how to be seen as a specialist. This is how to succeed online.

    Specialists do 1 thing and only post content, products and services on their site 100% aligned with the 1 thing.

    I know so well how scary it feels to let go being A Generalist but the peace of mind and success you experience by being A Specialists is well worth the release.

    Ryan
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  • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
    Hire a copywriter. Not a writer pretending to be a copywriter.

    Here's the difference:

    A writer wants to put words together and get praise for how they put those words together.

    A copywriter wants to SELL the thing. They ask, "How do I best sell this?"

    When you talk to a writer, if they talk about words, you are going to get more of what you've already gotten.

    What you have on your site that are supposed to be sales pages ... are blog posts.

    What do you want - Words ... or Sales?

    P.S. Your ideal customer needs to be identified. Nothing should be written until then. And no page should be created until the OBJECTIVE for that page is known.

    Kind of like, you can't really make sense of data ... until that data points to something.

    Words are data. They have to point to something.
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  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    Have to agree with what has been said before to a varying degree.

    This:
    Originally Posted by Joe Ray View Post

    But, I am not sure if this was a good idea? I wonder if I should have several unique sales pages instead, each with a different domain?
    says a lot.

    As a developer... I would say yes, you have created a language barrier... BUT more importantly you have created a UI ( User Interface ) barrier. You have a home page that you are using as a lander for everything it is you do. So your question to some point is relevant... but think about this for a moment how many business' do you know, have separate websites for each of the services / products they provide? - I will say I bet there are SOME.. but probably not to many the minority for sure.

    So in web design.. a home page is JUST THAT.. a home page.. think of it as the hub of your site, and not so much a destination. So your Home page Is " Your Business " attached to that page synergistically is all of the services that your business provides.

    If you start looking at things this way... you can ask some pretty simple questions.. Who are we? we are Deep Tenger.. what does Deep Tenger do? They do AI - answer what is AI etc.... what specifically does DT do? "data products" or "decision sciences" Those would be links.

    You have now separated your identity ( home page ) and you are now developing the web of services that surround what it is you are. you will now have 2 landers "data products" and "decision sciences". Break those apart and what is data products? what services do you provide as data products - this becomes another layer of services you provide. same for decision sciences. What is it? How will it help me.. what services are offered more links

    The deeper in the navigation you go the more precise the detail of a specific service becomes

    So you go from we are a consortium of people with more degree's than a thermometer in Wisconsin in January to given enough data we can predict the future.

    Hope that Helps!
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Ray
      Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post

      If you start looking at things this way... you can ask some pretty simple questions.. Who are we? we are Deep Tenger.. what does Deep Tenger do? They do AI - answer what is AI etc.... what specifically does DT do? "data products" or "decision sciences" Those would be links.
      Thanks so much! This is really helpful. I appreciate it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Anthony
    As a programmer I think I get where you are coming from. You like (and hopefully have a skill level) analyzing data. As others have indicated the site is highly disorienting. However the more I looked at what you do there IS a focus (the outlier is recruiting which should just go elsewhere and not be a part of this site)

    That focus is - using data to improve ROI and sales effectiveness - basically Sales Analytics

    That really sums up 80% of what you offer. What you are doing (or over doing) is relating the "how" and not the "what ".

    So the entire site should focus in on the benefits of tracking and analysis with the end goal being increasing sales or lowering customer acquisition costs. Thats a big profitable industry.

    As a tech person (or whoever wrote the copy) you are not focusing on the results the customer cares about but getting technical with paragraphs like this

    "A recommendations system is an information filtering technology providing personalized recommendations to users. Recommenders are commonly used for video recommendation systems like Youtube and Netflix or book and product recommendation engines like Amazon and eBay."

    that whole paragraph could simply state

    " With our proprietary technology we increase sales by presenting each customer with products (or services) tailored to their interests"

    Thats the "what" your prospective customer cares about - not learning about what a recommendation system is.

    eradicate this whole page

    Big data and analytics solutions | Business data processing DTVS

    Its just lecturing on tech not selling. Your offer is not to teach them your industry. Its to sell them on your ability to achieve profit centered results. If anything replace it with cases where companies increase their ROI and/or lowered their sales acquistion costs through data analysis and tracking.

    As Techheads we can get over concentrated on parts of technolgy we like but customers don't care . They want the benefits of the tech not to be geeked out.

    Thats one area thats creating issues but the second half is that when it comes to actually saying what it is you offer you get general and academic. At no point do I know specifically what it is that you actually offer. So you lecture in the details of tech but go general and hazy on what it is that you actually offer. For example - You reference software and things you have built that install on a desktop but I couldn't find a page that shows that software screenshot or specfically indicates what it does or its various features.

    So its strange. You get detailed as to terms of technology and yet get very general in what it is your software does.

    Finally ( of issues I am covering in this post ) theres no closing on any of the pages I saw. No signup form for more info. No click to schedule a demonstration. I don't think you will EVER see a sale like that. It basically has to be somone that says -

    "I have no idea what this person does but I am so interested I am going to contact them to find out what they might offer"

    Serious businesses don't have time for that kind of curiosity.

    You could do well with a redesign too. Even the picture of dice in the header is off putting. Makes you feel like whats to follow will have something to do with gambling or Vegas.

    of course sales copy and design might not be your thing and thers no shame in that. Sometimes its our specialty in one tech area that makes us less likely to be great in another. The recommendation to get someone to get this site sales focused is something you should consider.
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  • Profile picture of the author 1Bryan
    Go see what your competitors are doing. The successful ones. And hold off on "judging them" or whatever.

    Look to see what they are doing. I guarantee you they are targeting verticals very specifically.

    As long as you think your services are for everyone?

    It's going to be hard.

    Here's an example and it is only to put things into context:

    Let's say you decide, I sell data science to minor league baseball teams.

    Okay.

    So your website would have a "baseball look" to it. And you would talk about only baseball related data.

    So every software you have, when you explain it, would talk about it in terms of baseball statistics.

    Now the prospect can quickly picture what it does, how it can be useful, and blah blah blah.

    Right now, no prospect can picture in their head how your services can actually help them or fit into the context of their business.

    It's the easiest path.

    You need to have specific verticals and make all your advertising and content fit the context of those verticals.

    This will also help you close on the phone when you need to.

    Does this make sense?

    P.S. "We make things that do things" is about as broad as it gets. General Electric also makes things that do things. So does Ford. So does just about every company on the planet.

    Get specific.

    Really specific.

    "We make easy to use software that helps real estate brokers close 28% more leads and shortens sales cycles by 35%" would be a hypothetical example.

    Put that in front of real estate brokers and they can picture it.
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Banned
    Originally Posted by Joe Ray View Post

    "I don't quite understand what it is you do you seem to do everything. Can you explain?"
    Exactly!

    That's why you should focus on one thing.

    Don't try to please the entire world, focus on a very specific group of people, niche it down to the basics. Be the go to guy/gal for something specific.

    I tried to explain this in another forum thread and the dude said I was attempting to break him down. No, his entire forum is complete chaos of random subjects, literally zero focus on anything trying to please everyone and pleasing no one in the process.

    Stay focused.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve B
    Joe,

    Confusion on the part of your visitors is never a good thing.

    Focus on doing one thing for one audience and be the authority in the marketplace.

    Why one audience? Because if everyone in your pool of prospects is like-minded (homogeneous), then every promotion, every product, every piece of content you offer, every email you send will be of interest and relevance to everyone you are contacting about your business.

    Conversions (from contacts to actual customers) are so much easier when everyone you are marketing to wants exactly what you are offering.

    You might say this "singular" approach is so limiting. But it's really not!

    Internet business has global reach and there are thousands of prospects in nearly every niche - many more than you would estimate.

    In addition, once you become the "go to authority" for a single audience, you can ask those satisfied customers what other things they would like to received from you (their trusted authority and friend). Now adding a second niche is simple and easy. You already have an audience of people to market to and they know you're an authority in the marketplace.

    You can add new things and new people one by one to your business.

    Good luck to you,

    Steve
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    Steve Browne, online business strategies, tips, guidance, and resources
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Originally Posted by Joe Ray View Post

    My products and services are kind of in the same niche. This is why I created a website which contains everything: Deep Tenger Venture Studio - DTVS | Data Science & AI Technology

    But, I am not sure if this was a good idea? I wonder if I should have several unique sales pages instead, each with a different domain?

    I am not a SEO expert, but I think it might be easier to rank for a bigger site with more content than a single sales page. But, in my case, more content could mean more confusion. I received an email recently from a potential client. After he looked at my site, he said: "I don't quite understand what it is you do you seem to do everything. Can you explain?"

    I am interested in your opinion or recommendation.

    Thanks.
    Forget about SEO until you can be more focused. How many people looking to solve a problem are going to search for "data science" as a solution?

    You seem like you do everything because you are trying to everything.

    Instead of the academic gobbledygook you have on your home page right now, I'd use it to help people find what they need and direct them to a specific section of the site where you can go into more detail.

    I don't have a link to share at the moment (digitalmarketer.com comes close), but companies that are capable of doing many things sometimes use a site structure similar to the old "choose your own adventure" books. You start down the path, and at some point, you are faced with a decision. For choice A, go to page xx, for B go to page yy. You turn to that page, and the story continues.

    Answer: I can't define my primary market, or I should say, I can't narrow it down to a specific segment, industry or niche. I can't define it even by the size of an organization at this point.

    Here is the reason why: data science can be useful for just about anyone.
    I mean, from a football team to a movie producer, a political party to a church group, medical research or stock market predictions; from a small restaurant to fortune 500 companies etc...
    Try to please everyone and you end up pleasing no one.

    What kind of project(s) give you the highest returns, both monetarily and in terms of time invested? Which ones deliver the highest returns to your client?

    Try to define you ideal client -- the client you's happily fill your schedule with. That's who you go after.

    You don't have to exclude other types of clients, but you want to focus on getting more ideal clients.

    It's not so easy to define the target market by company size either; but, I can try to exclude some markets based on size.

    Very big companies have their own in-house data science teams. They will not use our services (but, they might still outsource some of their data science grunt work to us).

    Very small companies or individuals usually don't have the budget for data science services (but, we can do simple, inexpensive software development projects as well...).
    Okay, you have a start. Rule out large organizations and very small ones, as far as deliberately marketing to them. If they find you, and you can help them, cool. But focus on the clients that you can do the most for, with the highest return.

    Back to site structure. Suppose you identify three projects that may be ideal clients.

    You would have your home page, with short descriptions of each project and what you might do. Each description links to a subdirectory devoted to that project, with content explaining how you approach the project and what a client can expect to gain from the output. Maybe you offer a white paper for decision makers written in plain language and one for the techies where you can (pardon the expression) geek out to your heart's content. Include a call to action, including a description of your process - do you include a basic questionnaire, how long things take, maybe a range of possible costs and an offer to connect.

    Earlier, I said to forget about SEO, but using a topically focused silo structure like this will enhance your ability to rank for those topics.,
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