Crepe Material - Good For Green Screen?

by soheqy
8 replies
Hi guys so I have bought some muslin material which I want to use for green screen, but I`d like to overlay a whole room, now I know paint is better but my walls aren`t smooth enough so I`d prefer covering them with a material that I can stretch across. Now I`ve seen something called crepe material which seems to be good enough. I haven`t bought it yet. Any advice on if `crepe` material is good for green screens?
#crepe #good #green #material #screen
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  • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
    Originally Posted by soheqy View Post

    Hi guys so I have bought some muslin material which I want to use for green screen, but I`d like to overlay a whole room, now I know paint is better but my walls aren`t smooth enough so I`d prefer covering them with a material that I can stretch across. Now I`ve seen something called crepe material which seems to be good enough. I haven`t bought it yet. Any advice on if `crepe` material is good for green screens?
    Hi,

    Your post is a bit confusing because first you say you've bought muslin and you want to overlay a whole room and then you are saying you've seen something else and haven't bought it yet.

    First I would question the necessity for covering a whole room in chroma key as usually you will only need a background behind where you are filming and unless you are making some big production with multiple actors etc you wouldn't need full coverage. If this was the case you would have the budget to do it properly and have a significant lighting set up also.

    An easy way is to get the genuine chromakey fabric from a photography or videography supplier and this usually comes on a roll.

    You could get say a piece 3 metres x 2,4 metres 10' x 8' and just roll it around a length of 5" PVC plumbing pipe.

    Then suspend another piece of say 4' plumbing pipe through as a spindle from the ceiling and you can easily have your screen draped or rolled up to suit. You can get professional roller screens but the method above works well if on a budget.

    For example here in Australia you can get the green screen fabric for $10 per square metre or $30 per metre off a 3 metre roll width -->
    https://www.dragonimage.com.au/online-store/backdrops-supports-systems/roller-fabric-backgrounds/velvet/digi-green-screen-velvet-for-chroma-key-green-screen.html

    It's going to be a whole lot better and probably cheaper than stuffing around with poor material.

    Green screen also needs good lighting to work well so if you are trying to do it cheaply it isn't easy to get a great result unless you understand the lighting and invest in a good set up if you want a decent result.

    Most of the time you will find it better unless you are selling green screen content, like some of the fiver testimonials etc, to just shoot with a better natural background than wasting time.

    Best regards,

    Ozi
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    • Profile picture of the author soheqy
      Alright thank you Ozi, sorry for the confusion, I was just wondering if crepe material could be used for green screen production.
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      • Profile picture of the author Oziboomer
        Originally Posted by soheqy View Post

        Alright thank you Ozi, sorry for the confusion, I was just wondering if crepe material could be used for green screen production.
        It is the uniformity and consistency of the background colour and the lighting that is important with green screen. It can be any colour but commonly an intense blue or green.

        If the material has a uniform finish and you can adequately light it then it may not matter what it is made from. The important consideration is whether to not it can be composited as a layer when editing.

        It is always going to be easier to use something designed for the purpose as it will save you time.

        Maybe you should test a smaller sample and see if you can chroma key the material before buying a larger quantity.

        Best regards,

        Ozi
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    I was once interviewed for a local news show, and it took place in the same studio where they did the local news. Off to one side was the weather set, complete with shiny blue "green screen" of about 8'x10', as Ozi described.

    I noticed that it was very brightly lit from both the front and the back.

    When I asked, the technician told me that the two biggest enemies of doing chromakey were shadows and wrinkles. Both caused variation in the background color, which made it difficult to make the background image look real.

    As I recall, doesn't crepe have a pretty pronounced texture?
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    • Profile picture of the author soheqy
      The material I saw wasn't that pronounced. But I'll do as Ozi suggested and test a small sample with sufficient lighting.

      Thank you.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alishba Malik
    Very good!
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  • You can to do simple test.
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  • Profile picture of the author spearce000
    The biggest problem with green screen (AKA chromakey) is getting the lighting even. Use an incident light meter to eliminate any hot-spots. A crepe material might work as it will absorb the light and not reflect it. As others have said, best to try a test first.
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