Is it ok to use a Mailbox Etc rented mailbox as a physical business address?

12 replies
Hi,
Well, I'm in the midst of a mid-GDPR crisis, and I'm trying to figure out how to handle listing a physical mailing address on my Privacy Policy, and also to use with Mailchimp for any future mailings. I'm also considering getting an LLC, even though I really don't want to, and if I do that I would really like to use a separate physical mailing address instead of my home address. I just really don't want to announce my home address to the entire world and all the scammers that are in it.

Years ago I know it was considered ok to do that, but I don't know about current regulations. Does anyone know if you can just rent a box, and then list your business address as

Your business name,
1234 Mailbox Etc Lane (whatever their street address is)
Suite 127 (whatever your box number is)
Whatever City, Whatever State, 55555

Is that ok, or is that not allowed under FTC regulations, or even GDPR regulations?

Thanks,

Anthony
#address #business #mailbox #physical #rented
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  • Profile picture of the author DIABL0
    Mailbox etc, virtual mailbox services, etc... are all fine for Can-Spam compliance.

    Has to be a valid physical address that mail can be delivered to you.

    I have not read GDPR completely to know if it is the same.

    However, when I updated my privacy policy I made no changes regarding mailing address.
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    • Profile picture of the author spider222
      Thank you Diablo. Once again you have been very helpful.
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  • Profile picture of the author OptedIn
    Sure - just be aware that when someone types in your street address, they're going to see a nice picture of the UPS Store, or whatever.

    Cheers.
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  • Profile picture of the author mostCPA
    If you are working from home, which I am assuming you are use your home address as your physical place of business. You don't have to worry about customers finding your home address.
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  • Profile picture of the author DRP
    Consult with a lawyer since this is no substitute for legal advice.

    But you need a valid physical postal address appear in your emails. Period. That's for CAN-SPAM.

    For GDPR: I'm pretty confident that mailing addresses were not, and are not, part of that legislation going into effect on Friday (in the context of the OP's question). You should standardize your approach though so use a valid physical postal address within your emails.
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    • Profile picture of the author spider222
      Originally Posted by DRP View Post

      Consult with a lawyer since this is no substitute for legal advice.

      But you need a valid physical postal address appear in your emails. Period. That's for CAN-SPAM.

      For GDPR: I'm pretty confident that mailing addresses were not, and are not, part of that legislation going into effect on Friday (in the context of the OP's question). You should standardize your approach though so use a valid physical postal address within your emails.
      Thanks for your input. Since I made this post, I just now found this page which is from ftc.gov. According to it, you are allowed to use either a P.O. Box or a "or a private mailbox you've registered with a commercial mail receiving agency established under Postal Service regulations."

      I'm thinking that it should be sufficient as well for GDPR purposes....but I'm not a lawyer.

      https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/busi...guide-business
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  • Profile picture of the author cooler1
    I've noticed recently that a lot of marketers are promoting paid plugins that add pages to your website comply with GDPR. Is it worth it to buy a plugin for this or are people making changes another way?
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    • Profile picture of the author spider222
      Originally Posted by cooler1 View Post

      I've noticed recently that a lot of marketers are promoting paid plugins that add pages to your website comply with GDPR. Is it worth it to buy a plugin for this or are people making changes another way?
      The unfortunate reality, in my opinion, is that nobody has a step by step process to follow to achieve GDPR compliance. Yes there are plugins being promoted, but watch the videos for them carefully. The ones I've seen implement structures, but offer no help whatsoever with actual Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, and Cookie Compliance statements. I'll probably be making another post just about this topic later. It's quite the situation that everyone is in.
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      • Profile picture of the author DRP
        Originally Posted by spider222 View Post

        Thanks for your input. Since I made this post, I just now found this page which is from ftc.gov. According to it, you are allowed to use either a P.O. Box or a "or a private mailbox you've registered with a commercial mail receiving agency established under Postal Service regulations."

        I'm thinking that it should be sufficient as well for GDPR purposes....but I'm not a lawyer.

        https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/busi...guide-business

        You're welcome.





        Originally Posted by spider222 View Post

        The unfortunate reality, in my opinion, is that nobody has a step by step process to follow to achieve GDPR compliance. Yes there are plugins being promoted, but watch the videos for them carefully. The ones I've seen implement structures, but offer no help whatsoever with actual Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, and Cookie Compliance statements. I'll probably be making another post just about this topic later. It's quite the situation that everyone is in.

        Do not buy any plugins or whatever nonsense comes down the pipeline. Opportunistic marketers are always capitalizing on current events and people's ignorance.


        There's enough information out there about the EU GDRP. Just gotta put on your thinking cap and read up on it. Taxing? Sure....but penalties? Much more taxing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    You don't have to worry about customers finding your home address.
    That simply is not true. I know two marketers who have had total strangers show up at their door after finding the address listed on their website. Creepy.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnVianny
    GDPR is not about the mailing address you provide: you had to disclose a valid mail address even BEFORE the gdpr itself.
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    • Profile picture of the author spider222
      Originally Posted by JohnVianny View Post

      GDPR is not about the mailing address you provide: you had to disclose a valid mail address even BEFORE the gdpr itself.
      Yes I know. Well, I knew that was the case for any email purposes, yet I haven't had a mailing list so that hasn't been a concern for me yet. I didn't know that it was required for a Privacy Policy up until now. It is my understanding that it is required on a Privacy Policy for GDPR purposes. I also understand that GDPR encompasses many aspects. Not that I understand it all...I am very overwhelmed with all of it to be honest. I think many people are.
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