Why should you feel good if someone rips off your stuff?

24 replies
Hi!

I thought I'd make this post because I've noticed a few people recently have been upset because apparently their stuff has been ripped off. I 100% agree that it really sucks (I've had that happen to me in the past, so I know what it's like. I also managed to get it rectified to my satisfaction, so that was nice too ) But..........

There is actually a reason you should feel good (and might make it easier for you while you are protecting your rights and getting the person that ripped off your content to stop).

1. You should feel good because it means you are now starting to enter the big times and making an impact in other people's lives. Little players don't get ripped off, because they are too small. They don't have the reach. Crappy content doesn't get ripped off, because it is too crappy. People that make an impact, however, or have a quality product -- get copied/duplicated/ripped off/etc -- because someone else sees the value in that product/service and thinks that other people would like it as well. If someone rips off your stuff, you should look at it as a blessing -- it means you are starting to make an impact in other's peoples lives, and that you are starting to get 'in touch' with what people are looking for. So it's a good sign. Keep doing what you are doing and you will most likely enjoy much more success.

2. Just because someone rips off your stuff, doesn't mean they will be able to sell it. In fact, it actually helps you. Here's how. First off all, just because someone rips your stuff off -- doesn't mean they can make money. People like to think that you can simply rip off an idea and "magically" make money, it doesn't work that way. Why? Because they need to market the product/service. Hopefully (and obviously) you've learned how to market, whether its article marketing/videos/PPC/SEO, etc, etc. If someone rips off your stuff -- they would also have to know how to market it in order to make a profit from it. If they don't know how to write effective ads, or what software to use to "snipe" at bidding costs, or which directories to promote to, they aren't going to make a profit, in fact they'll lose a lot of money in the process. Plus, most people that try to 'rip off' someone else's idea are looking at "getting rich quick". They are generally lazy (heck, they ripped you off, and didn't even bother changing the landing/sales page/product/etc! ) So. If they don't see a return within say 1-2 days (the longer ones might wait 1-2 weeks), they get bored/discouraged/annoyed, and either try ripping someone else off, or simply giving up. If they "do" make money -- chances are it is like 1-2 copies/month. And, in a way it helps you in terms of "brand" recognition. Many times I have seen people that have their content ripped off actually more successful -- simply because potential customers are "familiar" with the "brand" name, etc. As an aside, if someone gets something for free (say 'stolen' stuff) -- many times they feel guilty and will 'eventually' make a purchase from the 'original' publisher.

Second... the people that do know how to market effectively, who have studied the techniques, who have successfully implemented them, don't usually rip you off! (Or if they do, they are smart enough to make their own unique product so it pretty much has no resemblance to yours anyways, and you wouldn't recognize it if you saw it. But from my experience, generally speaking these people have pride/confidence in their own abilities, so wouldn't rip you off in the first place). The select few that might consider it, generally don't -- because it would affect their reputation in the marketplace and make it difficult for them to do business elsewhere.

Bottomline:

Don't worry if someone rips you off! Look at it as a good thing -- you are starting to learn how to market effectively -- because you are now increasiing your reach and making an impact on other people's lives with quality products. Of course take appropriate action to get the infringing content removed, but don't worry/fret about it. The people that rip you off out-right generally speaking have no clue how to make money at it (because they are inherently lazy and don't want to work at it) -- and the people who could make money at your idea don't usually rip it off because they don't want to jeapordize their other business activities and/or have to much pride/confidence in their own abilities, so wouldn't rip you off in the first place.

Anyways, I hope that makes a few people who have experienced this feel better, and rest easy. Just keep working on creating quality products/services, honing and improving your marketing skills, and several years later you might have some of these people applying for a job at your company meanwhile you are trying to decide what country you should fly to for a weekend getaway

Cheers,

Johnathan

PPS: Of course, do everything you can do to protect your Intellectual Property. But don't get worked up about it Take action, and keep working!
#feel #good #rips #stuff
  • Profile picture of the author acrasial
    Yup, obviously one is doing something right, if other people feel the need to rip the stuff off. People simply get mad, because they fear the loss of sales and hate the idea of more competition, with their own things.

    You work hard for something, and at the end of the day, most people like the recognition for that work, to be in their own bank account... not someone else's. I guess that would be the bottom line for most people on this thing. But true, it most certainly is flattering.

    I have had some people take my things, and then put their own links and everything else on it, and get the sales. I wasn't too flattered in that moment...

    I also wonder why people cannot be more original or why they cannot give credit where credit is due? I know I may be guilty of this at times, but not when it comes to the crunch time with actual products and services....

    On that note as well... I must wonder why the person was that damn lazy that they couldn't just create their own content...? Why even get into internet marketing if one cannot make their own things, or spend the 5 minutes to make something like the thing they see. No, time is precious, let's take it and steal it instead.

    But like you said, they obviously don;t know what they are doing... then so why would one even want to spend their time being offended by such people... they only take up your time, not their own, as they obviously don't care.
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    • Profile picture of the author Johnathan
      Originally Posted by acrasial View Post

      Yup, obviously one is doing something right, if other people feel the need to rip the stuff off. People simply get mad, because they fear the loss of sales and hate the idea of more competition, with their own things.

      You work hard for something, and at the end of the day, most people like the recognition for that work, to be in their own bank account... not someone else's. I guess that would be the bottom line for most people on this thing. But true, it most certainly is flattering.

      I have had some people take my things, and then put their own links and everything else on it, and get the sales. I wasn't too flattered in that moment...

      I also wonder why people cannot be more original or why they cannot give credit where credit is due? I know I may be guilty of this at times, but not when it comes to the crunch time with actual products and services....

      On that note as well... I must wonder why the person was that damn lazy that they couldn't just create their own content...? Why even get into internet marketing if one cannot make their own things, or spend the 5 minutes to make something like the thing they see. No, time is precious, let's take it and steal it instead.

      But like you said, they obviously don;t know what they are doing... then so why would one even want to spend their time being offended by such people... they only take up your time, not their own, as they obviously don't care.
      Exactly. People who do try to copy like this, oftentimes skip steps, which generally includes the marketing. And if they do simply replace links, etc eventually you'll find out (because one of your own customers lets you know, or 'their' customer inadvertently contacts you) -- and of course you will be able to get that website taken down... so all their "hard" work in stealing (which still, even though they are stealing, they may take 5-10 hours getting things set up minimum) -- goes down the drain.

      So while stealing in the short-term might seem to work, it doesn't (the process is generally fairly simply for you to get stolen content removed), and it actually helps you because it bulids awareness for your brand, plus lets you know that you are doing something right
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    You can feel flattered by being ripped off, however, I issue DMCA takedown notices instead. Works for me every time. I also use DLGuard to protect my product downloads.

    Instead of wasting time feeling good about rip-off scam artists, I feel so much better when I've had my products removed from their sites.
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    • Profile picture of the author Johnathan
      Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

      You can feel flattered by being ripped off, however, I issue DMCA takedown notices instead. Works for me every time. I also use DLGuard to protect my product downloads.

      Instead of wasting time feeling good about rip-off scam artists, I feel so much better when I've had my products removed from their sites.
      Lol, I'm say of course do something about it -- but there isn't too much need to get worked up about it (some people seemed to get really stressed out until it was taken down).
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  • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
    It's all about where the value of your products lies. Is your value defined by what you have done, or what you are yet to do?

    If your value is in what you are going to do, then piracy doesn't reduce that value. They can only pirate what you've already done. Most of the concern around piracy isn't really about the money you lose (which you can't really calculate anyway), but about the fear that you won't ever do anything else as good.
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    • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
      Banned
      Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

      It's all about where the value of your products lies. Is your value defined by what you have done, or what you are yet to do?

      If your value is in what you are going to do, then piracy doesn't reduce that value. They can only pirate what you've already done. Most of the concern around piracy isn't really about the money you lose (which you can't really calculate anyway), but about the fear that you won't ever do anything else as good.
      Yeah right ....
      Actually, it's simply good business practice. It's the reason that stores and casinos put up video cameras ... it's the reason that people put alarm systems in their homes. Protection of property.

      The pirates are loving threads like this. They sit there smacking their lips looking over all the easy marks who don't think what they produce is worth protecting.
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      • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
        Originally Posted by sbucciarel View Post

        Actually, it's simply good business practice. It's the reason that stores and casinos put up video cameras ... it's the reason that people put alarm systems in their homes. Protection of property.
        This is where people get all screwed up about the notion of property.

        Property crime isn't about what the criminals get. It's about what the victims lose.

        Imagine that you have a goat, and you sell goat rides.

        If I take your goat, you don't have a goat.

        That's the problem. Not that I now have a goat, but that you now don't have one. You can't sell goat rides anymore.

        Everyone, everywhere agrees that you had a goat, and you had every right to have that goat, and I had no right to take your goat away from you.

        But imagine that I clone your goat. I walk over to your fence, and I get a few hairs from your goat off the fence, and I clone your goat. Now I have a goat, too. You still have yours. What crime was committed?

        The principle simply doesn't hold. The notion is weird. Theft is all about taking something away from you. That's the injustice. It's not unjust that I have a goat. It's unjust that you don't have a goat. And since you still have a goat, the old concepts simply don't apply.

        It's clear, when you go through all the details of what happens when there are two goats instead of one, that your business has just changed. But it certainly hasn't changed as much as it would if I took your goat away from you. The crime is lesser. How much lesser, we don't know, and we can't know.

        But the two extreme positions - that there is no crime, and that the crime is equal - are clearly wrong. We know that someone has affected your business, and that they did so in a way that they did not have any right to affect it.

        But your business is still there, and the impact to that business is no greater than it would be if a competitor entered the marketplace. I have certainly not reduced your ability to sell goat rides any more than I would if I had gone out and bought a goat of my own, which I have every right to do.

        My position is not that there is no crime, but that there is no material difference between this crime and legitimate competition. I ignore the crime, because I merely need to respond the same way I would to a competitor. It's practice.

        Could someone else write an ebook on the same subject and give it away free? Sure. Could it be of the same or similar quality? Sure. Would I need to adjust my business to account for that? Sure. And if I respond to this crime any other way, it teaches me nothing except how to respond to this crime.

        I prefer to respond to it as competition, and thereby learn how to better respond to competition. You can't post a DMCA notice to your competition. You can't call your competition's ISP and complain. You can't even send them a cease and desist letter. You have to respond purely in your own business activities.
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        • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
          Banned
          Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

          This is where people get all screwed up about the notion of property.

          Property crime isn't about what the criminals get. It's about what the victims lose.

          Imagine that you have a goat, and you sell goat rides.

          If I take your goat, you don't have a goat.

          This is all hog wash in my mind. Sorry, but Intellectual property rights are valid rights and I prove that every time I issue a DMCA to a host that is hosting my content without my permission. They take it down without hesitation.

          You sell a service rather than something that already exists. I've paid outsourcers and backlinkers and advertising costs for my products. There's a big expense in much of what I sell. I've invested in my products. To then find that someone has stolen my products and they can now be downloaded all over the Internet is to dilute my profit potential and the value of the product. Just try listing a high quality website on Flippa that has been ripped and is all over the place. It no longer has ANY value whatsoever.

          That is exactly what would happen to my products if I allowed it. I don't allow it. I diligently protect my products and anyone who puts in their hard work and money and time on a product should protect theirs as well.

          It takes me all of 15 minutes to submit a DMCA to take down my work from people who have stolen it. It's 15 minutes well spent in my opinion.
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          • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
            Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

            That's probably because it fails, badly.
            Explain the logic underlying this conclusion.

            Actually, [something very rude, for which I apologise].

            EDIT: Here's the point I'm trying to make.

            I don't deal with piracy the way most people do, because it's a losing battle. I have very specific reasons to believe that, and if you'd like to know why I deal with piracy differently, I have no problem explaining them.

            But there is no right answer.

            That's the problem with piracy. You can't answer the question rationally and reliably, because too much of it is guesswork - and you aren't going to guess right every single time.
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            • Profile picture of the author zapseo
              Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

              Explain the logic underlying this conclusion.

              Actually, [something very rude, for which I apologise].

              EDIT: Here's the point I'm trying to make.

              I don't deal with piracy the way most people do, because it's a losing battle. I have very specific reasons to believe that, and if you'd like to know why I deal with piracy differently, I have no problem explaining them.

              But there is no right answer.
              Um...excuse me? No right answer to what? You mean (bright lights, said in godly tones "There is no right answer." (which, paradoxically, is an answer itself...) or "There is no right answer for me" ?

              To me, you seem to be hinting a logic that has a very slippery-slope. And the bottom of that hill ain't at all pretty.

              So I'll bite on your offer. What's your explanation?

              That's the problem with piracy. You can't answer the question rationally and reliably, because too much of it is guesswork - and you aren't going to guess right every single time.
              You could likely make that argument about just about anything you pointed your mind at. (Re-phrased: it is the characteristic of being human and human knowledge that we humans could make that argument about just about anything we pointed our mental power at.) Not being able to not guess reliably is not a reason for abdicating the game.

              That's why God made "best guesses."

              The surest thing around for most people is science. And science is based upon ... statistics. But even statistics is a made-up art, that humans use to take a bunch of events and decide the probability of their re-occurrence. Or, as one of my favorite quotes goes: "There are lies, d*** lies and statistics."

              As for your example -- you need to read up a little more about what's going on in the IP of genetics. People are patenting genes! This has caused a problem, because now, some people can't work on some diseases without violating someone's patent! The late brainy author Michael "Jurassic Park" "E.R." Crichton (sp?) was a great advocate of killing off the idea of patenting genes.

              It's also used in many genetically-modified foods, which no longer have seeds, forcing the farmers (for various reasons) to continue to have to buy from the likes of Monsanto.

              Think what you want about piracy (to everyone in the thread, especially the OP) -- but it doesn't pay the bills. Sorry, no, it doesn't.

              @OP (Johnathan):

              Point #1 -- that you know how to market effectively, is sheer BS. Often, all you have to do is post a WSO. Now, my compliments to Allen, the WSO is wonderful. And posting a WSO is a good decision -- but I hardly think it qualifies as "coming of age" as a marketer.

              The idea that you are "finally" making an impact on the world is sheer, utter nonsense. People pirate stuff more often for the thrill it gives them than for the desire for content. Sites where lots of pirated products cross hands also have threads where people comment on having stopped downloading everything -- because they don't use it, never looked at it, etc.

              Point #2 -- seems to be making the assumption that what you are selling is a MMO or GRQ type of product. That's just plain silly. With that rationale, textbooks should be free, right? Cookbooks, too? What about products on copywriting or traffic generation.

              Your argument falls flat by taking a "straw man" position.

              And I HAVE seen people rip off others. One of my past clients created an outstanding product and had good luck with it. Only to have someone take his product and sell it as a bonus to his worthless adwords ebook. My client got that changed, but the marketer was/is well-known.

              As for piracy itself -- my opinion is that, yes it's not likely to go away; yes, you can get up too much in arms about it; and also, you should protect your product like mad.

              I know that there are pirate sites (not strictly warez) that monitor JV sites to find out about upcoming launches and swipe the products. It happened to a client of mine. (Which is why one of the first questions I ask of clients is -- "how are you protecting the download of your product." He worked hard, did "all the right things" -- put together a quality product and had the steam go out of his sails because he failed to protect the download.

              Money that could have been used for making the product better, adding features to the product, etc., wasn't there. Which is a shame, because I think it's an excellent product.

              People often complain about crappy products in IM. Well, maybe, just maybe, there would be higher quality if more of the authors were able to be adequately re-compensed for their time & effort by having people pay for their products, and not steal them.

              Live JoyFully!

              Judy
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              • Profile picture of the author Johnathan
                Hi Judy:

                1. I think again there may be a bit of a misunderstanding here. Of course course protect your IP property, and do everything you can do to that (including protections, etc). But if it so happens it gets ripped off, take action and don't worry about it.

                2. Actually, getting put on rapidshare/megaupload, etc, etc is *not* necessarily a bad thing. First off -- you are *assuming* people will magically and automatically download the stuff. People have to first *know* what to look for, and there is a ton of crap on those sites, so its overwhelming for many people. Second -- people who *do* use those services oftentime risk getting viruses installed on their system -- so while there might be some short term benefit (a "free" e-book) -- as soon as they unzip the .rar file (or install the self installing .exe) -- there computer becomes a zombie/bot computer and they can't understand why it takes 5 minutes to visit the google homepage, so they have to spend 5-6 hours completely re-installing their computer system from scratch to remove the virus. So while it may look 'short-term' they are getting something for nothing, not really.

                And then finally -- usually what happens -- is if someone does get a ripped version, they eventually end up paying for a copy either out of guilt, or -- when you have a new product -- they don't want to go through the hassle of re-installing their computer system, etc. It's "cheaper" for them just to buy a copy than to actually spend 5-6 hours trying to find your e-book, fix their system, etc, etc.

                3. You are incorrect that 'all' people pirate for the sheer thrill of it. If you are talking about the piraters themselves (who make it available), some, yes, but not all. For the people who download it, in some cases it's because it's too expensive for them (at the present time). But come 2-3 years later, if you are still in the business, and keep making new products -- and if they have learned how to generate income on their own -- you'll find that they go back to you to get a "legit" copy because they feel better about themselves and their own finances. Many people are like this, perhaps not all -- but many yes. Look at a company called winzip. Before they were bought out, they implemented exceptionally poor copy protection, the software was pretty much for all intents and purposes "free", but when they were bought out and released their financial data -- they were pulling in $25 million/year. This is *one* example. There are many, many other examples like this.

                4. Just because someone makes a WSO doesn't mean they'll make sales. Yes, it happens -- but again -- its a one off thing. Its one 'facet' of marketing. Someone who goes for the get-rich-quick scheme by ripping off someone else's stuff and trying to pass it off as their own, will not only quickly find themselves exhausted (because it actually is a bit of work trying to do that) -- but they will have to deal with all the angry people afterwards. So while it "looks" that they are benefitting short-term (which they may very well be doing), long-term it is not a sustainable business model.

                The thing is -- you are looking at the "immediate" effect. "Immediately" someone who rips it off and sells it as their own may see an effect. But then they have to deal with the stress, the wasted time, etc, etc when someone simply takes 15 minutes to find out who to send a DMCA notice to, and the time it took them to create the website, to some marketing, etc, etc is all wasted. And if they try to do it again, they have to re-do everything from scratch.


                Originally Posted by zapseo View Post

                Um...excuse me? No right answer to what? You mean (bright lights, said in godly tones "There is no right answer." (which, paradoxically, is an answer itself...) or "There is no right answer for me" ?

                To me, you seem to be hinting a logic that has a very slippery-slope. And the bottom of that hill ain't at all pretty.

                So I'll bite on your offer. What's your explanation?



                You could likely make that argument about just about anything you pointed your mind at. (Re-phrased: it is the characteristic of being human and human knowledge that we humans could make that argument about just about anything we pointed our mental power at.) Not being able to not guess reliably is not a reason for abdicating the game.

                That's why God made "best guesses."

                The surest thing around for most people is science. And science is based upon ... statistics. But even statistics is a made-up art, that humans use to take a bunch of events and decide the probability of their re-occurrence. Or, as one of my favorite quotes goes: "There are lies, d*** lies and statistics."

                As for your example -- you need to read up a little more about what's going on in the IP of genetics. People are patenting genes! This has caused a problem, because now, some people can't work on some diseases without violating someone's patent! The late brainy author Michael "Jurassic Park" "E.R." Crichton (sp?) was a great advocate of killing off the idea of patenting genes.

                It's also used in many genetically-modified foods, which no longer have seeds, forcing the farmers (for various reasons) to continue to have to buy from the likes of Monsanto.

                Think what you want about piracy (to everyone in the thread, especially the OP) -- but it doesn't pay the bills. Sorry, no, it doesn't.

                @OP (Johnathan):

                Point #1 -- that you know how to market effectively, is sheer BS. Often, all you have to do is post a WSO. Now, my compliments to Allen, the WSO is wonderful. And posting a WSO is a good decision -- but I hardly think it qualifies as "coming of age" as a marketer.

                The idea that you are "finally" making an impact on the world is sheer, utter nonsense. People pirate stuff more often for the thrill it gives them than for the desire for content. Sites where lots of pirated products cross hands also have threads where people comment on having stopped downloading everything -- because they don't use it, never looked at it, etc.

                Point #2 -- seems to be making the assumption that what you are selling is a MMO or GRQ type of product. That's just plain silly. With that rationale, textbooks should be free, right? Cookbooks, too? What about products on copywriting or traffic generation.

                Your argument falls flat by taking a "straw man" position.

                And I HAVE seen people rip off others. One of my past clients created an outstanding product and had good luck with it. Only to have someone take his product and sell it as a bonus to his worthless adwords ebook. My client got that changed, but the marketer was/is well-known.

                As for piracy itself -- my opinion is that, yes it's not likely to go away; yes, you can get up too much in arms about it; and also, you should protect your product like mad.

                I know that there are pirate sites (not strictly warez) that monitor JV sites to find out about upcoming launches and swipe the products. It happened to a client of mine. (Which is why one of the first questions I ask of clients is -- "how are you protecting the download of your product." He worked hard, did "all the right things" -- put together a quality product and had the steam go out of his sails because he failed to protect the download.

                Money that could have been used for making the product better, adding features to the product, etc., wasn't there. Which is a shame, because I think it's an excellent product.

                People often complain about crappy products in IM. Well, maybe, just maybe, there would be higher quality if more of the authors were able to be adequately re-compensed for their time & effort by having people pay for their products, and not steal them.

                Live JoyFully!

                Judy
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                • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
                  CD,
                  Explain the logic underlying this conclusion.
                  Sure.

                  You suggest that nothing has actually been taken from the creator of the product. That they still have everything they had before, and that it's not significantly different than having competition from someone who created a similar product on their own. That is not accurate.

                  What they no longer have, in the functional sense, is the thing on which copyright is based: Control over distribution of their work, which includes setting the price at which someone may obtain the product.

                  That's gone. And that matters.

                  I've seen pirates get hold of products that sell for $400 and sell them for $10. (Or just give them away.) Contrary to what some people here often say, some of the people who steal stuff via pirate sites would actually buy the products if they weren't available that way. I know. I've watched them.

                  I've "seen" people come to a site where I'm selling something, and then disappear for a half hour. They've come back and spent 15 or 20 minutes trying to guess the URL of the product. Only when they can't do that do they end up buying.

                  You know what they're doing in that half hour in which they're gone...

                  How do you "see" that? The server logs. It's actually pretty simple. You sort by IP, then look for the 404s and order links. Check the time stamps. Doesn't take any fancy software. Just a decent text editor.

                  I have personally been accused of "running a scam," because someone found a site pirating one of my products at a price lower than what I charge for it. Once someone makes a decision like that, they're unlikely to ever change it, no matter that they find out the other "seller" is a thief.

                  The thing that is more evil, and yes, I do mean that word in the literal sense, is that the creator's own efforts are being used against them. Not the efforts of a competitor, mind you, which is a fair part of the market. His or her own creativity, time and intelligence are stolen, for the benefit of a parasite.

                  This is, by the way, the same kind of evil that fuels the people who promote CPA deals with hidden continuity offers that appeal to people with a strong desire to improve themselves. Malicious parasitism. If you doubt the malicious part, hang out in some of their forums and read the way they talk about the people who take those offers.

                  At any rate, yes, the owner of the product loses something very valuable when their property is pirated.

                  How you choose to deal with that is another matter. No, you can't stop it entirely. Not as long as there are cultures where intellectual parasitism is considered a normal and acceptable way of life. But you do have choices.

                  Some of them are dependent on the type of business you're running. In Suzanne's case, you're talking about 100% loss on a given product if a client fails to pay and uses the product anyway. For her, there's a serious incentive to go after the pirates, and a high likelihood of success in doing so.

                  Some depend on the market. Some depend on the personal preferences of the creator of the product.

                  No, there is no one answer that's right for everyone. Simply dismissing anyone who takes action to stop it, as often happens in this forum when the subject comes up, is not a right answer. Not for anyone.

                  Nor is dictating or ridiculing another person's response, as also happens here occasionally. One gentleman in this group often repeats the fact that he's told a few of us about some of our products being linked by pirates. His comments suggest some unpleasant things about the folks who choose to leave those links open.

                  I'm one of the people he told about such links. I left them open deliberately, in order to see what I could learn about the behavior of the market when the options exist.

                  He doesn't name the people he informed, but he makes them sound like they're idiots for not taking the action he thinks is correct. It doesn't seem to have crossed his mind that there might be useful and valid reasons for choosing a different response.

                  Dismissing this as a losing battle isn't useful. It is also not accurate. It's a spectrum, along which varying degrees of success can be reached, at some cost. The cost/benefit decision is an individual thing, and will be different for every person.


                  Paul
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            • Profile picture of the author jbr
              Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

              I don't deal with piracy the way most people do, because it's a losing battle.
              Kinda like the the "war on drugs"? That big scam thats putting the US in more and more debt?

              the only people benefiting from that program is the government and drug dealers.

              back on topic...

              The way i see it is- if I have to expand more energy in trying to resolve a negative issue than what its effecting me, its not worth it. and normally, this seems to be the case, atleast for me.

              Because I can use that same energy on something positive and see better results than wasting energy on something that will yield little results.

              Most people don't like other people profiting from there stuff (rightfully so), but being able to ACCEPT IT might take a little work for people. That Ego doesn't wanna let go

              Also, eben pagan (as far as im aware) "accepts" the fact that his stuff is pirated and doesn't waste much time going after people for it. Probably because his time is much more valuable than going after people, as is mine...
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  • Profile picture of the author TheRichJerksNet
    CDarklock Maybe I am tired or maybe my head hurts too much but I got to say, you lost me half way through your post ... lol

    James
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
      James,
      CDarklock Maybe I am tired or maybe my head hurts too much but I got to say, you lost me half way through your post ... lol
      That's probably because it fails, badly. It's based on a faulty analogy, among other things.

      Intellectual property law exists because of the difference between "real property" and IP, and the confusion people have about these issues. There's very little point discussing the difference once someone makes up their mind on it. They can run themselves around in the sloppy logic forever, and they have an investment in defending an already stated position.


      Paul
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  • Our content gets ripped off all the time. The consolation? It's RARELY ever done well.
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  • Profile picture of the author Johnathan
    sbucciarel: Reading your responses, I think you may have misunderstood the intent of my post.

    Of course protect your intellectual property. Do everything you can to defend it. A DMCA notice is very effective, I agree. I used equivalents before the DMCA really became what it i snow. But. If it happens that it does get stolen, don't get worked up about it. This thread was intended for people (usually beginners to IM/etc) who start getting all stressed out, and worried about stolen content. It really sucks, but I was basically saying suck it up, take action, and feel flattered. It means you are doing something right.
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    • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Johnathan View Post

      sbucciarel: Reading your responses, I think you may have misunderstood the intent of my post.

      Of course protect your intellectual property. Do everything you can to defend it. A DMCA notice is very effective, I agree. I used equivalents before the DMCA really became what it i snow. But. If it happens that it does get stolen, don't get worked up about it. This thread was intended for people (usually beginners to IM/etc) who start getting all stressed out, and worried about stolen content. It really sucks, but I was basically saying suck it up, take action, and feel flattered. It means you are doing something right.
      No ... I understand what you are trying to say ... I'm just pointing out that there are very effective ways of dealing with it. I have never found it to be a losing battle or really to take that much effort.

      Like I said, I spend money and time on my products and I lose all of that when it is pirated. I cannot sell an exclusive, unique website if it is no longer exclusive and unique, so I take the matter seriously.

      In this forum, there are a lot of dishonest people posing as "Warriors". As soon as a hot WSO comes out, people in here are distributing it through RapidShare and Megaupload and other file sharing sites. They aren't selling it ... they get some kind of brownie points in their BH forums for sharing it. Gives them status and recognition.

      Then there are sites who offer it at a discount. They are easy to find and to stop with a DMCA notice to their host or to the file sharing sites. Actually, in the case of Rapidshare and other file sharing sites, all I had to do was contact them and they removed it.

      It's not difficult to protect your products.
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  • Profile picture of the author KristieDean
    Originally Posted by Johnathan View Post

    Hi!

    I thought I'd make this post because I've noticed a few people recently have been upset because apparently their stuff has been ripped off. I 100% agree that it really sucks (I've had that happen to me in the past, so I know what it's like. I also managed to get it rectified to my satisfaction, so that was nice too ) But..........

    There is actually a reason you should feel good (and might make it easier for you while you are protecting your rights and getting the person that ripped off your content to stop).

    1. You should feel good because it means you are now starting to enter the big times and making an impact in other people's lives. Little players don't get ripped off, because they are too small. They don't have the reach. Crappy content doesn't get ripped off, because it is too crappy. People that make an impact, however, or have a quality product -- get copied/duplicated/ripped off/etc -- because someone else sees the value in that product/service and thinks that other people would like it as well. If someone rips off your stuff, you should look at it as a blessing -- it means you are starting to make an impact in other's peoples lives, and that you are starting to get 'in touch' with what people are looking for. So it's a good sign. Keep doing what you are doing and you will most likely enjoy much more success.

    2. Just because someone rips off your stuff, doesn't mean they will be able to sell it. In fact, it actually helps you. Here's how. First off all, just because someone rips your stuff off -- doesn't mean they can make money. People like to think that you can simply rip off an idea and "magically" make money, it doesn't work that way. Why? Because they need to market the product/service. Hopefully (and obviously) you've learned how to market, whether its article marketing/videos/PPC/SEO, etc, etc. If someone rips off your stuff -- they would also have to know how to market it in order to make a profit from it. If they don't know how to write effective ads, or what software to use to "snipe" at bidding costs, or which directories to promote to, they aren't going to make a profit, in fact they'll lose a lot of money in the process. Plus, most people that try to 'rip off' someone else's idea are looking at "getting rich quick". They are generally lazy (heck, they ripped you off, and didn't even bother changing the landing/sales page/product/etc! ) So. If they don't see a return within say 1-2 days (the longer ones might wait 1-2 weeks), they get bored/discouraged/annoyed, and either try ripping someone else off, or simply giving up. If they "do" make money -- chances are it is like 1-2 copies/month. And, in a way it helps you in terms of "brand" recognition. Many times I have seen people that have their content ripped off actually more successful -- simply because potential customers are "familiar" with the "brand" name, etc. As an aside, if someone gets something for free (say 'stolen' stuff) -- many times they feel guilty and will 'eventually' make a purchase from the 'original' publisher.

    Second... the people that do know how to market effectively, who have studied the techniques, who have successfully implemented them, don't usually rip you off! (Or if they do, they are smart enough to make their own unique product so it pretty much has no resemblance to yours anyways, and you wouldn't recognize it if you saw it. But from my experience, generally speaking these people have pride/confidence in their own abilities, so wouldn't rip you off in the first place). The select few that might consider it, generally don't -- because it would affect their reputation in the marketplace and make it difficult for them to do business elsewhere.

    Bottomline:

    Don't worry if someone rips you off! Look at it as a good thing -- you are starting to learn how to market effectively -- because you are now increasiing your reach and making an impact on other people's lives with quality products. Of course take appropriate action to get the infringing content removed, but don't worry/fret about it. The people that rip you off out-right generally speaking have no clue how to make money at it (because they are inherently lazy and don't want to work at it) -- and the people who could make money at your idea don't usually rip it off because they don't want to jeapordize their other business activities and/or have to much pride/confidence in their own abilities, so wouldn't rip you off in the first place.

    Anyways, I hope that makes a few people who have experienced this feel better, and rest easy. Just keep working on creating quality products/services, honing and improving your marketing skills, and several years later you might have some of these people applying for a job at your company meanwhile you are trying to decide what country you should fly to for a weekend getaway

    Cheers,

    Johnathan

    PPS: Of course, do everything you can do to protect your Intellectual Property. But don't get worked up about it Take action, and keep working!
    I agree. Several of my articles that I wrote years back are still out there - only now they are on sites that didn't pay me...they ripped my copyright. I've let it go because I have gotten paid once for the articles, and now it is getting my name out there (albeit under my maiden name and not my married one!)
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  • Profile picture of the author terryd
    When issuing a DCMA what do people use for this, are they using a template or is this done through a lawyer?
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  • Profile picture of the author CliveG
    In summary, don't get mad get even. And if a job's worth doing (the get even bit) it's worth doing properly!
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  • Profile picture of the author Scott Ames
    Some choose to fight, some choose to ignore. I tend to fight, but I realize that spending time on the negative just takes away from doing the positive aspects of business.

    What we lack, and what big companies have, is a whole legal department to take care of the nasty bits while we concentrate on making more revenue.
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    Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm. -Winston Churchill

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  • Profile picture of the author xlfutur1
    Thanks for the headsup on the DCMA takedown notice. Info and how to file with google is at this link Digital Millennium Copyright Act
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