Social Media Certification?

15 replies
I just ran across an email about becoming an ISMA Certified Social Media Specialist. The President of the organization is Mari Smith.
Now Mari knows what she's talking about and has helped many people understand and use Social Media and Facebook to grow their business.

I guess my question is, do we need a certification?

When I first started in IT I was Cisco Certified and it got my foot in the door to a well paying job and all the ones after that. What business is looking for applicants with an ICSMS certification after their names? How many Social Media jobs are out there?


What are your thoughts on this?

Here's a link to the site so you will know more.

ISMA Professional Certification - International Social Media Association
#certification #media #social
  • Profile picture of the author Rich Struck
    I don't think we need a certification but it looks interesting anyway. Any idea what the cost is?
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    • Profile picture of the author mscopeland
      Originally Posted by Rich Struck View Post

      Any idea what the cost is?
      Per the link provided:

      "ONLY $2795 for platinum members!

      *$2845 for premium members or $2995* for basic members"
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      • Profile picture of the author Rich Struck
        Originally Posted by mscopeland View Post

        Per the link provided:

        "ONLY $2795 for platinum members!

        *$2845 for premium members or $2995* for basic members"
        Ah okay I missed it somehow. Eh.... I think that is far too much to pay for information you could probably find yourself for free. Yes, it is nice to have it all in one place but IMHO that is just too expensive.
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        • Profile picture of the author mscopeland
          It is expensive, but in the world of certification training, it's about average. If you go for an MCSE or CCNA certification you may pay about the same thing. The only difference is, of you search for jobs with those certifications, there are thousands accross the US.

          I don't know if there will be a demand for a SMSCertification, or if businesses would hire for social media jobs. I know there are, just not a lot.

          I could see this benefiting consultants though. "Why should I choose you over consultant 2?" "Well I'm a certified Social Media Specialist."
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  • Profile picture of the author BradCarroll
    If you're part of the corporate world and can get someone else to pay for it, then it might be worth what you spend...
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  • Profile picture of the author BradCarroll
    Hi Michael I think you've got it right, I know people who pay more than this for a three-day business seminar. Just trying to make a joke at the expense of the corporate world.

    Social media are already catching on as "the next big thing(s)" and I bet this kind of thing will be better than being "Microsoft Certified", like people were doing 10 years ago.
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  • Profile picture of the author MichaelHiles
    Certification in anything is only as good as the "body" that is granting the certification.

    Like an "accredited college" or... Microsoft MCSD or Oracle OCP.

    Most of the HR people I know would belly laugh at the idea of "social media certification".... I can hear the questions now... "You mean you're formally trained on how to make compelling wall posts on Facebook?" or "You have 10 hours of hands on with syndicating your status updates through ping.fm"

    Don't mean to rain on Mari's parade, but this is going to be useful to her bank account, and not much more in the corporate setting.
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    • Profile picture of the author seasoned
      Originally Posted by MichaelHiles View Post

      Certification in anything is only as good as the "body" that is granting the certification.

      Like an "accredited college" or... Microsoft MCSD or Oracle OCP.

      Most of the HR people I know would belly laugh at the idea of "social media certification".... I can hear the questions now... "You mean you're formally trained on how to make compelling wall posts on Facebook?" or "You have 10 hours of hands on with syndicating your status updates through ping.fm"

      Don't mean to rain on Mari's parade, but this is going to be useful to her bank account, and not much more in the corporate setting.
      I had a customer once ask ME what I thought about certification. I said basically the SAME thing! I ALSO added that there are "brain dumps", etc... to pass tests. I have taken MANY MS tests, and was an MCSD. I did it ONLY to see what it was like, and for the PERCEIVED value.

      Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author DennisM
    Hey Michael,

    I hate to burst your bubble Chief but some of us "HR" folks out there do value certification.

    Regards,
    Dennis
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    • Profile picture of the author MichaelHiles
      Originally Posted by DennisM View Post

      Hey Michael,

      I hate to burst your bubble Chief but some of us "HR" folks out there do value certification.

      Regards,
      Dennis
      Yeah, real certification from a real entity... something more than a made up organization designed to line the pockets of the promoters from people who don't really know any better.

      Hell if all you're telling me is that the HR folks I know are in the extreme minority, and they only care about certification because someone said so, I have been in the wrong business and intend to set up multiple certification bodies across a bevvy of industries post haste.
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      • Profile picture of the author chrisalbright
        Consumers always like certifications. Especially when it comes to things that might go bad (Certified Pre-Owned cars for example). It makes them feel better; that somehow the quality is vouched for by someone who knows how to judge it.

        Certification (in any discipline) has two main benefits:

        First, it establishes some degree of credibility for you in the eyes of someone who doesn't already know you, or has not come to know you by recommendation from a trusted friend/colleague. You get to align yourself with a brand that may already be trusted, and that trust will automatically rub off onto you in the consumer's mind. It's credibility payload also kind of depends on how well known the certifier is. For example "MCSE" is well known (at least to those who would be hiring one), but "Windows Certified User" doesn't have any weight because, (afaik) it doesn't really exist!

        Second, it *may* give you some additional knowledge in that discipline. In this case, that would probably not be more than you can get on your own; especially since the social media landscape is so fluid right now. Certain specifics that are true today may not be true tomorrow, and tomorrow's truths have not yet been considered.

        I guess it just boils down to will you make more money with the certification than without it? I think you should expect to make many times the cost of the certification as a result of getting it or it will be a waste of time.

        By the way, if $2995 sounds like a lot... you can get my "Certified Social Media Professional" designation for only $1995, and if you join the "Amalgamated Marketers Association" today for $995 per year, I'll apply your first year's dues to the cost of your CSMP! That brings your total investment for the "Certified Social Media Professional" designation down to only $1000. A much better value indeed.

        Of course I'm being glib, but it's to illustrate a point: there is no certifying body for certifying bodies. Anybody can start handing out certificates for anything, any time. So if you can't measure your direct financial benefit from investing 3 grand into certification, or if that benefit is not significant (I'm not talking break even here, I mean 5x to 10x minimum) I'd say just skip it.
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  • Profile picture of the author rockfuse
    web2.0 is out web3.0 is in , who wants to spend that kind of money on information that can be obtained any where for free, these guys do not have secret information that none one else has. Those things are a big scam. I have gone to a lot of seminars and stuff and most of the time you can get more information from the warrior forum than you can there.
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  • Profile picture of the author DogScout
    I decent graphics program and a printer... get all the certificates you need

    There are corporate HR that do consider them in hiring. The brass at corporate like them as well. Try getting a gig managing a large Adwords account without Googles certification. It is the first thing a half way knowledgeable interviewer asks. (Getting a small account should be no problem though, at least for now.)

    The value of any cert is many times more perceived than real, but it is relied upon many times regardless.
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  • Profile picture of the author blur
    Internet Marketing Certificate | Online Internet Marketing Course

    San Fran offers a full internet marketing cert for about $5000. I would love to take it, but don't have the $5000.
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