HOW MUCH COPY DO YOU NEED TO GET $5 BUCKS?

13 replies
Five dollars... not a huge amount, right?
How much advertising copy do you need to get a prospective client to send you five measly dollars?
If you're one of those silly dudes who know nothing about marketing, you'd say...
"Keep it short and simple"... right?
Well... I have a client who regularly sends out a 12-page letter that asks for $5 bucks... and he gets sometimes a 32% response (depending on the mailing list).

Almost 1 out of 3 send him $5 bucks from his 12-page letter.
Imagine that.
Actually he's tested the waters and he doesn't like short letters. "They don't work." he says.
I have the 12-page letter, I'll send it to you if you reach out to me.
The letter asks for $5 and those who send in $5 bucks, get a longer, 32-page letter that asks for $300... and that's where he makes his real money.

I'm bringing all this up to remind you that "people" will not read long winded ads and sales letters, but PROSPECTS will. Big difference. Keep that in mind.
If you're a "prospect" for a safari trip to Africa, you're HUNGRY for information and will read any amount of ad copy about the trip to Africa -- as long as it's INTERESTING and HELPFUL.

So, how much copy do you need to get $5 bucks out of a prospective client? In the case above, the guy needs 12 pages of ad copy.
Just thinking.
#bucks #copy
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  • It depends.

    I wouldn't need any copy to sell a $5 product to my own email list. And I'd get a higher response than 32%.

    So your conclusions are based on selling a $5 product to cold traffic. People who don't know you, or trust you. In that case, I see the benefit in writing a 12 page letter. Just like I can see the benefits in creating a 5 page letter to get a highly responsive subscriber, for free.
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Good point Declan,
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Dear Declan,

      I just thought of a direct response story that you might get a kick out of.
      Your point about... "I wouldn't need any copy to sell a $5 product to my own email list. And I'd get a higher response than 32%."... reminded me of this.

      Years ago... I heard of a preacher, who sent a mailing to his donor list saying...
      "Hurry, Send me $29 I'll explain later."

      ...and many on his list did send in money.

      To those who sent money he sent a letter explaining about how a terrible storm had played havoc on an orphanage in Thailand, (or somewhere) and they needed the money to rebuild.

      POINT: Your own list is valuable.

      Just like you said

      Linwood
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      http://linwoodaustin.blogspot.com/20....html?q=bedell

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  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    I think you're asking the wrong question

    The better approach would be: What kind of FUNNEL would I need to get an average of $5 from my page visitors?

    Simply getting a sales page in front of random eyeballs isn't going to work
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Dear writeaway


      YOU SAID:

      Originally Posted by writeaway View Post

      I think you're asking the wrong question

      The better approach would be: What kind of FUNNEL would I need to get an average of $5 from my page visitors?

      Simply getting a sales page in front of random eyeballs isn't going to work

      MY REPLY:

      The client with the 12 page letter that asks for $5 bucks... this IS his funnel.

      Yes, it's an off-line funnel... direct mail... but the $5 bucks is just to be able to send them his FOLLOW UP sales letter which asks for $300 bucks... and THAT'S where he make his money.



      So I suppose the question would be, if you're doing an "online funnel" do you want to get rid of the tire kickers??? The ones who are never gonna pay you anyway... ??? If so, charge them a little something to go to the next level. Right?



      "Funnels" are actually "old school". Probably invented by the old Sears Roebuck Catalog people.



      Just thinking.

      Linwood
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  • Profile picture of the author IMWealthMogul
    I think the amount of copy needed to sell a $5 offer is going to depend on how targeted the traffic is, the nature of the product, and how well the copy is written.

    Some copywriters may take the long winded approach of 12 pages, while others may be able to get good conversion numbers with fewer words.

    If you're asking this because you have a $5 offer of your own you're looking to sell, you should start with at least 2 different versions of your copy and run a proper A/B split test and let the test results guide your decisions.

    There is no one size fits all copy length.
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Originally Posted by IMWealthMogul View Post

      should start with at least 2 different versions of your copy and run a proper A/B split test and let the test results guide your decisions.

      Max...

      The client with the 12 page letter, asking for $5... has tested and tested and tested.

      This letter works, while others (shorter) failed.



      It's so easy to tell others to do A/B test... but the truth is testing is so rare. Hardly anyone does it. And in most cases, depending on the industry, the market is so small, testing A/B style does not make sense.



      For example: A plumber with a market of 45,000 home owners, who might see his yellow page ad... split testing is a hassle.

      For a car dealer in the same town, with a different batch of used cars to sell each week, would never bother with split testing... the best he could do was if he discovered long copy worked, use long copy all the time. But in his case, the ads must change every damn week. None can be repeated.



      So... in the oddles and ooddles... of cases where split testing is not practical... why not start out with a 12 page letter.



      BTW... the client with the 12 page letter, hired some top names to beat his 12 page letter.... and THEY SUCKED.



      I could forward this letter to you... and it would BLOW YOUR MIND... as it's so cheesy, you'd never think it would work... yet it does.

      Twelve pages of cheese, that's the amazing thing 'bout it.

      Just thinkin'
      Linwood
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      • Profile picture of the author SARubin
        Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

        I'm bringing all this up to remind you that "people" will not read long winded ads and sales letters, but PROSPECTS will. Big difference. Keep that in mind.
        Who was it that said... "Nobody reads advertising. People read what interests them, and sometimes it's an ad" ?



        Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post


        I could forward this letter to you... and it would BLOW YOUR MIND... as it's so cheesy, you'd never think it would work... yet it does.

        Twelve pages of cheese, that's the amazing thing 'bout it.

        Just thinkin'
        Linwood
        Hey Linwood,

        I'd love to see this guys 12 page sales letter.

        Always interested in seeing what works (And I'll try not to let the "cheese" factor sway my opinion )
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Hancox
    I like this post. It's easy to miss the particular gems in a post like this, such as...

    "People" will not read long winded ads and sales letters, but PROSPECTS will. Big difference. Keep that in mind.

    Yes. Absolutely. The question then becomes... do they need to?

    To put a spin on what you said right afterwards...

    If you're a "prospect" for a safari trip to Africa, you're HUNGRY for information and will read any amount of ad copy about the trip to Africa -- as long as it's INTERESTING and HELPFUL

    Let's say, on one particular trip, one of your prospects happened to get lost in an African desert, and ended up hungry. If I came along with a plate of delicious food and they had $5... how many pages of copy would it take to convince them to buy the food from me? 12? 24?

    (Also, how many pages would it take for a ride home?)

    Probably the only "ad copy" needed would say something like...

    "Want this? Only $5."

    In other words, the amount of copy you need is also related to the amount of DESIRE that already exists.

    Prospects have the ability to say "Yes"... but it's the people with a burning desire who will say "H*ll yes!"

    In the case of your client, it took 12 pages to turn 32% of presumably fairly cold leads into a "H*ll yes"... which is pretty impressive.

    So, how much copy do you need to get $5 bucks out of a prospective client? In the case above, the guy needs 12 pages of ad copy

    I look at this a little differently. I'd ask, "how much copy does it need to turn a "Hmm, I'm willing to hear you out for a nanosecond or two" prospect to "H*ll yeah how do I pay?" customer.

    The difference is DESIRE.

    As others have pointed out, the amount of copy would be different depending on how much desire, trust etc you've already pre-built with your target audience. A list owner has already built trust, so won't need to do as much trust-building.

    Anyway, I think your post was valuable for highlighting that there isn't a simple relation between the amount of money you're asking for, and the amount of copy needed.
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  • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
    NOTES ON THE AMOUNT OF COPY NEEDED:

    As a general rule of thumb, the more money you want, the more copy you should have to justify the purchase.

    We had a catalog client years ago, who was having trouble with profits and sales in his catalog for audio/visual equipment.

    One of the problems was there was the same amount of catalog ad copy for a $50 product as there was for a $2,000 product. NO. NO. NO.

    The minimum thing we did was INCREASE the ad copy on all the HIGH END products and miracles happened.



    Over the years, I have found that IF, I can convince a client to RAISE HIS PRICES... he magically feels the need to do a better job of SELLING in order to justify the price, and magic happens. As long as he was a "low-price competitor" he did not bother with much in the way of salesmanship... and why should he???... "take it or leave it" is the low-price excuse for a marketing message.



    In many industries, it's the low-price dude who goes out of business first. For example, low-priced plumbers are kinda famous for going out of business every 3 years and opening up under a new name. Why? They just did not charge enough money to cover ALL THE EXPENSES. In that industry, the Plumbers who charge 5 TIMES labor, double the materials then, add in taxes, usually survive. The plumbers who are destined to go out of business, always accuse the "5 Times" guys as "rip offs" .... and they charge 2 or 3 times labor... but it never works. Trucks are rusty. No uniforms. Absolutely no bonuses.

    POINT:

    POINT:

    POINT:

    This client is making money in direct mail, with a 12-page letter, and I can't tell you how many damn fools have told me "Direct mail doesn't work, I've tried it and it just don't work."

    Did they mail out anything close to a 12-page letter? No. Did they have a strategy at all in direct mail? No.

    The last guy to tell me that direct mail doesn't work was a former restaurant owner. He said, "I tried direct mail, it doesn't work." --- But he did not try the BIRTHDAY MAILING LIST... You see, birthday boy has to have a party somewhere? Why not have it at YOUR restaurant??? Hmmmm?

    Without the right strategy and the right offer, no medium will work.

    Direct Mail is and always has been the overlooked darling of the marketing universe.

    Even Google uses direct mail. And has for years.

    Just thinking.

    Linwood
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  • Profile picture of the author depotgang
    It not about quality of content its about the quality of the copy.

    You know the difference between a $7 product and $997 product?

    Marketing!

    Seriously I've purchased stuff for $997 that had the same information as a PLR ebook.

    Good luck
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  • Profile picture of the author shawnlebrun
    Selling is selling.

    It all comes down to making the right pitch to the right audience.

    some times it will only need a short amount of copy, other times a much longer amount.

    I've written 30 page letters that sold millions in fitness books.

    I've written 4 page sales letters that ask for just an opt in.

    I've written 2 sentence emails that LED to millions in sales.

    It all boils down to who you're talking to, why, etc...

    If you try to enter the conversation that your intended prospect
    is having in their minds... it can often help you decide how to
    approach the copy.

    But after almost 20 years of writing copy and selling online...
    there's no hard and fast rules... it's ALL a test. all of it.

    What works for one may not work for another, and vice versa.

    I'm constantly amazed at just how many times I've seen "copy rules"
    not work as I thought they would...

    As long as people are irrational... so will their response to certain things.

    It's all a test...
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  • Mutually catalytic blendyjuicy.

    If'n stuff ain't 'bout that, ima no play.
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