How do I find out whether I positioned myself too broadly with my brand?

10 replies
Hello,

I've decided to invest time into my personal brand around software (integration) consulting for small businesses.
So far, I've defined 4 different personas that I'd like to serve with different offers.
My content evolves around Website, Webshop, CRM, Marketing Automation and integration of everything as well as generally about digital transformation. That all, with a technical background, but I'm trying to write for non technical people (so that business owners understand the challenges better, that they're facing).

Does that sound too broad? Should I better focus more? On what?
I'd be happy about your input.

Thanks
Chris
#brand #broadly #find #positioned
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  • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
    Originally Posted by Chris8080 View Post

    Hello,

    I've decided to invest time into my personal brand around software (integration) consulting for small businesses.
    So far, I've defined 4 different personas that I'd like to serve with different offers.
    My content evolves around Website, Webshop, CRM, Marketing Automation and integration of everything as well as generally about digital transformation. That all, with a technical background, but I'm trying to write for non technical people (so that business owners understand the challenges better, that they're facing).

    Does that sound too broad? Should I better focus more? On what?
    I'd be happy about your input.

    Thanks
    Chris
    Many accounting firms do this, and act as a Value-Added Reseller of the software.

    And there are plenty of people who don't like the technical side of business.

    What I recommend you do is look for the way to differentiate yourself. You need to Stand Out.

    Niching down or focusing could look like:

    - picking specific software, type of software, or range of software that you help organizations get the most out of

    - working with a specific industry, eg. industrial wholesalers, medical offices

    - promising a specific outcome, eg. "You'll be able to get Sources of Truth out of your software for the first time ever!"


    There are other possibilities.

    The sad fact is most software either isn't used or is massively underutilized. The CRM programs alone should show you salespeople tend to hate them, having to click through way too many screens to get where they want to go...and therefore they use their own Excel sheets instead--and where does the data stay? On their individual hard drives, not in a central location where it can be used by the executive team.

    That's just one example and it's incredibly commonplace.

    User adoption & change management are big things you're up against. It's not just about the "click here, do this" syntax side of implementation. There are reasons people aren't using the tech. And they go beyond "education".
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    • Profile picture of the author parrker090
      Jason, exactly, you're on that one. If person or a company should start their own business - they simply have to get a simple CRM system, few additional workers and start it. Even if there would be problems or mistakes. Only those people who do nothing - have no mistakes. And talking of that, if your company would provide orders from hundreds of client, I can highly recommend this call center in cloud solution, cause it's the most reliable solution on the market.
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris8080
    Many thanks, valuable input.

    It's probably best / nicest to work with "digital" companies which have tech to some extend in their culture. Focusing on E-Commerce might be an option then.
    Focusing down more on .. let's say E-Commerce sports and outdoor industry seems to be a bit scary, just because it's very narrow and there might be $0 coming from that area whereas potential other clients would be wanting my services and they don't feel addressed with my content.
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    • Profile picture of the author savidge4
      Originally Posted by Chris8080 View Post

      Many thanks, valuable input.

      It's probably best / nicest to work with "digital" companies which have tech to some extend in their culture. Focusing on E-Commerce might be an option then.
      Focusing down more on .. let's say E-Commerce sports and outdoor industry seems to be a bit scary, just because it's very narrow and there might be $0 coming from that area whereas potential other clients would be wanting my services and they don't feel addressed with my content.
      First things first, for the most part E-Comm is E-Comm it really doesn't matter what they are selling. I would suggest the point to target is the platform the E-Comm is operating under. You would then be designing your solutions around the system in place vs directing towards a "Market" or Niche"

      The needs for a "System" on the back end of WooCommerce as an example is needed. Anyone that uses it, understands its a cluster flip on a good day. Most other platforms are not much better. If you are really paying attention to this aspect of the business you will see the likes of Gary Vaynerchuk have entered the market targeting Shopify. You might want to look up "VaynerX" and check out what they are doing with "Vayner Commerce".

      Hope that Helps!
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Kanigan
      Originally Posted by Chris8080 View Post

      Many thanks, valuable input.

      It's probably best / nicest to work with "digital" companies which have tech to some extend in their culture. Focusing on E-Commerce might be an option then.
      Focusing down more on .. let's say E-Commerce sports and outdoor industry seems to be a bit scary, just because it's very narrow and there might be $0 coming from that area whereas potential other clients would be wanting my services and they don't feel addressed with my content.
      A common fear... shrug it off. If you stand for nothing you'll fall for anything. People will see your focused message of "I help [TARGET]" and then come ask you... "I know you work with X, but can you help me in Y?"
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  • Profile picture of the author joaquin112
    Do you already have any customers? Why don't you just niche down into a single service while you find your first customers, and then based from their input decide whether you want to branch out or not?
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  • Profile picture of the author samsabir
    It would be better to use more specific niches and industries. you can target the tools that are used in your targeted industry commonly. Also, include one or two words describing a broad category and some other with the extremely specific ones.
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  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    You're doing it in REVERSE

    Focus first on your branding channels

    Craft your persona accordingly

    "Build it and they will come" no longer works in 2020 (hasn't worked in a while, actually)
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  • Profile picture of the author xesports
    In my opinion , in business I don't think you can be too broad , because from one perspective , when one of your businesses is down, then another would be prospering , or could be prospering , also with the extra work load I'd always say that's good , because you'd always have something to do.
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  • Profile picture of the author Medon
    Originally Posted by Chris8080 View Post

    Hello,

    I've decided to invest time into my personal brand around software (integration) consulting for small businesses.
    So far, I've defined 4 different personas that I'd like to serve with different offers.
    My content evolves around Website, Webshop, CRM, Marketing Automation and integration of everything as well as generally about digital transformation. That all, with a technical background, but I'm trying to write for non technical people (so that business owners understand the challenges better, that they're facing).

    Does that sound too broad? Should I better focus more? On what?
    I'd be happy about your input.

    Thanks
    Chris
    Identifying the ecomerce businesses you can offer the services to will give you a mileage. It will make your work easier.Good luck.
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