Is It Sleazy TO Sell Products You Haven't Tried?

63 replies
As an affiliate marketer, there are so many options to choose from when it comes to selling products and many networks to choose from.

It's very easy to go through Clickbank or some other network and choose the product you see that is very popular and pays a good commission.

Do you believe it's important to try the product first and sell only after you tried it and you really believe in the product?

Or maybe you only sell from reputable marketers that you trust even if you have not tried the product.

Or maybe you just feel it's sleazy to sell a product you haven't tried.

What do YOU think?
#clickbank affiliate site #niche affiliate marketing #niche affiliate sites #products #products on demand #reputable marketers #sell #sleazy
  • Profile picture of the author Medon
    I think you should use the product first before you contemplate selling it. This way, you will have a good selling experience including explaining things .
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    It's often impractical and usually unnecessary to try every product you sell. For example, I sell over 300 Clickbank products, and never personally used any of them.

    How many products do you think a salesclerk at Walmart owns? Or a car/boat salesman? Real estate agents? Hardly anyone ever buys what they are promoting.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by myob View Post

      It's often impractical and usually unnecessary to try every product you sell. For example, I sell over 300 Clickbank products, and never personally used any of them.

      How many products do you think a salesclerk at Walmart owns? Or a car/boat salesman? Real estate agents? Hardly anyone ever buys what they are promoting.
      I agree. In many instances, it's not practical or needed to buy the product yourself.

      For example, you sell something not in your field of expertise, or something you would not normally use. There is no need to buy it.
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    • Profile picture of the author MikeFriedman
      Originally Posted by myob View Post

      How many products do you think a salesclerk at Walmart owns?
      That's not even remotely close to the same thing.

      The sales clerk at Walmart is also not going to hand you a pamphlet titled "The 10 best lawnmowers of 2020" while steering you towards the one that pays him or her the highest commission.
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      • Profile picture of the author Monetize
        Originally Posted by MikeFriedman View Post

        That's not even remotely close to the same thing.

        The sales clerk at Walmart is also not going to hand you a pamphlet titled "The 10 best lawnmowers of 2020" while steering you towards the one that pays him or her the highest commission.

        It is an analogy and it's close enough for this conversation.



        Originally Posted by Ben Scott Jr View Post

        As an affiliate marketer, there are so many options to choose from when it comes to selling products and many networks to choose from.

        It's very easy to go through Clickbank or some other network and choose the product you see that is very popular and pays a good commission.

        Do you believe it's important to try the product first and sell only after you tried it and you really believe in the product?

        Or maybe you only sell from reputable marketers that you trust even if you have not tried the product.

        Or maybe you just feel it's sleazy to sell a product you haven't tried.

        What do YOU think?

        If you feel uncomfortable promoting products that you have
        not personally tried, then don't promote them.

        But if you are marketing multiple products, some of which
        may be oversized or overpriced, such as vacations or other
        major purchases, then it is not possible to try each item out
        for yourself and you will need to rely on other research, like
        reading manufacturer specifications, brochures or customer
        reviews, to determine whether you want to promote it.

        As to CB products, if you are a serious marketer, you might
        contact the publisher and ask for a complimentary copy for
        you to review. I have done this before and they usually
        cooperate.

        Use your best judgment and do what works for you.
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        Originally Posted by MikeFriedman View Post

        That's not even remotely close to the same thing.

        The sales clerk at Walmart is also not going to hand you a pamphlet titled "The 10 best lawnmowers of 2020" while steering you towards the one that pays him or her the highest commission.
        Now that is sleazy. And not even remotely close to how I sell affiliate products. I don't have a problem promoting products which I've never tried from established suppliers and vendors.

        Most affiliate programs, ie Amazon, Clickbank, CJ, Walmart, etc have consumer protection systems in place such as testimonials, money-back guarantee, etc as well as legal recourse against rogue marketing practices.
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by MikeFriedman View Post

        That's not even remotely close to the same thing.

        The sales clerk at Walmart is also not going to hand you a pamphlet titled "The 10 best lawnmowers of 2020" while steering you towards the one that pays him or her the highest commission.
        I agree about the Walmart analogy.

        But there are plenty of salespeople out there that wouldn't normally own what they sell.

        In my very limited field of selling vacuum cleaners in people's homes....It was better if you owned what you sold, because you would be asked "What do you use at home?"

        Also insurance...can you imagine an insurance salesperson that had insurance with a different company?

        But online? The advantage I can see owning the product you sell is that you can write a review, which will sell what you bought.

        In fact, that may be the best reason to buy what you sell, because you can review the product, and answer questions about it intelligently. I cannot imagine that you wouldn't make more sales if you wrote a detailed review of an offer, with an affiliate link at the end.
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        • Profile picture of the author MikeFriedman
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          I agree about the Walmart analogy.

          But there are plenty of salespeople out there that wouldn't normally own what they sell.

          In my very limited field of selling vacuum cleaners in people's homes....It was better if you owned what you sold, because you would be asked "What do you use at home?"

          Also insurance...can you imagine an insurance salesperson that had insurance with a different company?

          But online? The advantage I can see owning the product you sell is that you can write a review, which will sell what you bought.

          In fact, that may be the best reason to buy what you sell, because you can review the product, and answer questions about it intelligently. I cannot imagine that you wouldn't make more sales if you wrote a detailed review of an offer, with an affiliate link at the end.
          I'm not saying you can't push products you don't personally own. I'm just saying the Walmart salesclerk analogy does not fit at all. They are certainly not expected to even research the products on the shelf much less make an informed recommendation on anything.
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          • Profile picture of the author myob
            Originally Posted by MikeFriedman View Post

            I'm not saying you can't push products you don't personally own. I'm just saying the Walmart salesclerk analogy does not fit at all. They are certainly not expected to even research the products on the shelf much less make an informed recommendation on anything.

            Perhaps I wasn't clear, but this analogy actually does fit quite nicely with my marketing style. I don't know anything, I don't recommend anything, nor do I care anything about any specific product.

            My customers make their own purchase decisions from vendors that I personally trust will provide them value. Walmart does the same.

            Perhaps it's just me, but affiliates who write product "reviews" are usually not objective, for obvious reasons. This is most often disingenuous and a thinly disguised marketing tactic or "sales pitch", in my not so humble opinion.

            I have found you can make more sales faster, better, and cheaper by writing articles providing value on their own with in-line contextual-relevant affiliate links or re-directs sprinkled 3-5 times or so within the article or email message.

            Building trust with your customers or prospects is done through providing consistent valuable content over time. The products are soon forgotten, but it's the customer experience which remains. I never endorse any specific affiliate product.

            As I mentioned, I sell over 300 Clickbank products, and many more hundreds of others through Amazon, CJ, and other reputable affiliate platforms.

            My customers trust me, and I trust each of these affiliate networks to take care of my customers no matter what they choose to buy.

            Admittedly, there sometimes are unhappy buyers, but so far I have not had any problems with vendors' money-back guarantees, or removing and replacing underperforming products.
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            • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
              Originally Posted by myob View Post

              Perhaps it's just me, but affiliates who write product "reviews" are usually not objective, for obvious reasons. This is most often disingenuous and a thinly disguised marketing tactic or "sales pitch", in my not so humble opinion.
              That may be true. But I have reviewed plenty of products I sell, but none I created.

              A review of anything you created id just a pitch (Not that there is anything wrong with that)

              But my reviews (not that you meant my reviews) are genuine reviews of what I sell. I can offer insights....about applications, and who the product best fits. that other reviewers just don't have.

              I'm assuming this would be more applicable if a dealer sold (and tried out) several offers in the same line, from different providers. It would be more in their best interests to be truthful and offer full disclosures when making comparisons and recommendations.
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    • Profile picture of the author JPs copy
      Having been in B2C and B2B sales for a few years, I have sold several products I wouldn't use myself. It's not exactly about me, it's about what the customer wants.

      Here's an example. My realtor has sold hundreds of homes, but at the end of the day, she probably wouldn't want to live in most of them.
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  • Profile picture of the author George Flm
    I actually purchased the product I was promoting *after* I made sales as an affiliate.

    I was really curious so I plunged the dough to see what the deal was all about.

    But I did not make any wild statements and informed my readers about it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    Originally Posted by Ben Scott Jr View Post

    Do you believe it's important to try the product first and sell only after you tried it and you really believe in the product?
    It's about positioning. Affiliate marketing covers a wide spectrum; you can be a trusted friend, a knowledgeable expert, an insider tipster, a curator of deals, an info or entertainment provider or you could just show up with your link at the right moment.

    How you choose to position yourself will dictate your prospects' expectations. It's only sleazy when you pretend to be what you're not.
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  • Profile picture of the author talfighel
    When you own the product, you have MORAL authority to recommend it or not.

    I like to buy the product and try it out before I go out and market it.

    Plus it is easier to sell it when you know what your customers are about to buy,
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  • Profile picture of the author 55sadhikar
    It's always good to own a product and then promote it. Only when you promote a good product and it helps people then they are more likely to give you an ear when you recommend them the next product. When selling affiliate products, its important to create and build trust.
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    Anythin' says ...

    here's comfy and confidence-inspiring lingerie

    for the life you want to live today



    which also kinda ravages ass & fanj with equal (an' unrelentin') ferocity.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    In the end it's not about whether it's 'sleazy' or what the ethical and moral considerations are....this is marketing after all.


    I think the question is whether you can research and write well enough to SELL products you haven't tried. Some marketers can - and do. Others try and can't.
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    • Profile picture of the author umc
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      In the end it's not about whether it's 'sleazy' or what the ethical and moral considerations are....this is marketing after all.


      I think the question is whether you can research and write well enough to SELL products you haven't tried. Some marketers can - and do. Others try and can't.
      Yeah, this is marketing, and you're asking on the Warrior Forum. If you can put the screws to someone to make a buck, you should feel good. Ethics, morals, who cares. It's all about sell through. Just go buy a few things in the WSO section here. You'll see how it works.
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

    That may be true. But I have reviewed plenty of products I sell, but none I created.

    A review of anything you created id just a pitch (Not that there is anything wrong with that)

    But my reviews (not that you meant my reviews) are genuine reviews of what I sell. I can offer insights....about applications, and who the product best fits. that other reviewers just don't have.

    I'm assuming this would be more applicable if a dealer sold (and tried out) several offers in the same line, from different providers. It would be more in their best interests to be truthful and offer full disclosures when making comparisons and recommendations.
    Product reviews really are more of a reflection on the marketer than the product being sold. Misrepresentation can occur (and does) whether the marketer tries out the product or not.

    A lot of people have the misconception that you can only write an honest review when you have the product yourself. This is usually NOT TRUE!

    In fact, there is a tendency for people who own the product to write a biased review just to promote and sell the product.

    So, having the product yourself doesn't necessarily mean your review will be totally honest and valuable to your readers. It really depends on the information and content you provide.

    Being an expert in your niche and being an effective researcher are the strategies most successful marketers use to sell products.

    For affiliate marketers such as myself, who may sell thousands of different products, trying out each of these products is just not practical.

    Instead, we provide quality content for building trust with our targeted audiences, and use trusted affiliate platforms such as Clickbank, Amazon, CJ, Shareasale, etc linking to contextually-relevant products.

    The sale is made from the vendor sales copy, not what we say about the product.

    An excellent book explaining this process in greater detail can be found here.

    [P.S. In practice, my articles will typically have a maximum of 3 links to the vendor sales page.]
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  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    OP, would you AVOID going to a doctor that specializes in cancer therapy unless she herself had cancer in the past?

    I get the SUBTEXT of what you're saying - the CONFLICT OF INTEREST in most product reviews

    The FTC has quite a number of rules regarding affiliate links

    Just because MANY people don't follow these doesn't mean they shouldn't exist

    The opportunity? By CONSISTENTLY AND CLEARLY indicating you'll get paid for sales made through the links you posted, you EARN TRUST

    Why?

    You didn't hide the ball.

    You didn't razzle dazzle

    Instead, you were upfront.

    That makes you stand out compared to the tons of the "intent keyword"-targeted affiliate review articles out there

    I suspect that Google will eventually INCENTIVIZE review marketers to properly tag/label their aff links and recommendations through RANKING PENALTIES

    The E-A-T update was just the beginning
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  • Profile picture of the author Melvin Gonzalez
    I think that in the IM and MMO niches you should get at least a review copy or buy them yourself.

    There are many products that do not deliver as they promised on their sales letter and this ultimately can affect your credibility with your subscribers if you have your own list.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      For all of you who say you should own the product you are selling, a hypothetical.

      Say you have a blog about fitness. You own a Percor threadmill. You promote that and only that? Or would you promote a threadmill at the high end and one at the lower?

      Will you buy the high end and the low end and use all 3?

      And what do you do about bikes, recumbent and compact? How abour ellipticals?

      I mean, there arw quite a few good models and I do not see how it is practical for you to buy them all.

      Would it not be better for your buyers if you researched the companies that nade them, the warranties abd guarranties and how they stabd behind them, and how many complaints they have?

      I know you are talking about IM products. But an honest review from someone who made a product work (by accident or because they found without realuzing avway to copmensate) when most people fail because the product is not good enough? How is that helpful?
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      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by DABK View Post

        For all of you who say you should own the product you are selling, a hypothetical.

        Say you have a blog about fitness. You own a Percor threadmill. You promote that and only that? Or would you promote a threadmill at the high end and one at the lower?

        Will you buy the high end and the low end and use all 3?

        And what do you do about bikes, recumbent and compact? How abour ellipticals?

        I mean, there arw quite a few good models and I do not see how it is practical for you to buy them all.

        Would it not be better for your buyers if you researched the companies that nade them, the warranties abd guarranties and how they stabd behind them, and how many complaints they have?

        I know you are talking about IM products. But an honest review from someone who made a product work (by accident or because they found without realuzing avway to copmensate) when most people fail because the product is not good enough? How is that helpful?
        If it were me, my choice would be whether to mention I owned the one elliptical or not.

        Of course you cannot buy every exercise machine that you might promote. Like you said, you would use the information available....and I would probably include the complaints. Why? By including complaints on one or more offers, you make the other offers sound more credible, and increase your own credibility.

        The one rule I would follow is to not lie. Don't say you use one model if you don't. Getting caught in a lie is one sure way to guarantee that you become someone's online project.
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        • Profile picture of the author DABK
          If an affiliate gives full information... (how they did the research, what they found good about the product, what they found bad about it), I could not care less if you used it.


          I do not trust people who used a product more than people who have not used.


          I trust reviews in aggregate, not each individually. I mean, someone can buy a product and they can have a miserable experience or a great one. But that could be a fluke, a mistake. So, if a reviewer says I used it and this is how it works for me, I take that into account, together with other reviewers.


          If the one I am dealing with is the only one that had a particular problem (or a good result) and the others go the other way[, it is irrelevant.


          QUOTE=Claude Whitacre;11609202]If it were me, my choice would be whether to mention I owned the one elliptical or not.

          Of course you cannot buy every exercise machine that you might promote. Like you said, you would use the information available....and I would probably include the complaints. Why? By including complaints on one or more offers, you make the other offers sound more credible, and increase your own credibility.

          The one rule I would follow is to not lie. Don't say you use one model if you don't. Getting caught in a lie is one sure way to guarantee that you become someone's online project.[/QUOTE]
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  • Would you be comfortable recommending the product to a friend?
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  • Profile picture of the author TobiMDD
    When I first started with affiliate marketing I promoted a few pdf's which were free to download and a clickbank course.


    The fun part about this was that I never read those files and didn't like them.

    Oh and I hated the clickbank course I was promoting because the sales video was annoying and too long in my opinion.



    All in all I can say that I promoted two things which I would never use myself and did not like in any way. I just wanted to make some money.


    Guess how much money I made with it? You are right zero.



    That's why nowadays I only promote products/systems that I personally use. I need to be convinced of what I'm offering to people because that way I can make my customers and myself happy.


    So in my opinion you don't need to own or buy every product yourself but you should know exactly what this product does and strongly think about whether you would buy it yourself and if it really solves a problem.
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    If stockbrokers own shares in companies they promote, it may lead to serious inquiry by the SEC.
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  • Profile picture of the author GoranDuskic
    Here's a question for everybody that thinks you need to own the product you are selling.

    Let's say you are selling an expensive juicer, TV, boat, etc. And you buy one, it's great and you start selling it / recommending it, and everything is perfect.

    Then comes along a potential buyer. She tells you, I really like the product you are recommending, but I can't afford it. Do you have something less fancy, but a lot cheaper. Do you:

    a) Buy several cheaper products, test them, pick and own one, then start selling that as well? Keep doing this until you need a hangar to store all the shit you bought over the years?
    b) Turn down the potential client, telling them, your legal and moral obligation is to sell only what you own, otherwise, you are sleazy.
    c) As a professional in your field, you make an educated guess? Listen to the clients needs and deliver a solution you feel would be suited best?

    To sell is to help. If nothing, be guided by this thought. Am I helping someone by selling these products? Would I sell this product to my mother? Am I providing additional value by offering these products?
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by GoranDuskic View Post

      Here's a question for everybody that thinks you need to own the product you are selling.

      Let's say you are selling an expensive juicer, TV, boat, etc. And you buy one, it's great and you start selling it / recommending it, and everything is perfect.

      Then comes along a potential buyer. She tells you, I really like the product you are recommending, but I can't afford it. Do you have something less fancy, but a lot cheaper. Do you:

      a) Buy several cheaper products, test them, pick and own one, then start selling that as well? Keep doing this until you need a hangar to store all the shit you bought over the years?
      b) Turn down the potential client, telling them, your legal and moral obligation is to sell only what you own, otherwise, you are sleazy.
      c) As a professional in your field, you make an educated guess? Listen to the clients needs and deliver a solution you feel would be suited best?
      As a professional in your field, you should know about the products you sell, and know about the competition.

      I sell vacuum cleaners. I own two at home. We sell about 35 different models. If someone asks, I tell them what I use at home. I never lie about it. If they don't ask, I don't tell them, unless they are looking at a model we have at home.

      If you sell multiple items, unless they are very inexpensive, it's silly to buy them all, just so you can say that you use it yourself.

      And, I have to say this....the fact that you use it yourself isn't the biggest reason for them to buy.

      A car salesperson doesn't personally own every car on the lot, as a private automobile.

      Insurance salespeople don't buy one of every policy they offer.

      Real estate salespeople don't live in every house they sell.

      This thread is all about a very minor issue. Personally using what you sell has advantages. But it's silly to use 25 different offers, unless you would buy them anyway.

      If you sell one thing, and it makes sense for you to use it...buy it. If it doesn't make sense...don't.

      You should recommend what is in the customer's best interests. Often times, it's not what you would use. Because you...are...not...them.
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  • Profile picture of the author myob
    The advantages of being a sales rep or affiliate marketer is that you don't have to own every product you sell.

    For example, companies and affiliate networks already have systems in place to handle customer service, warranties, refunds, etc.

    Sleazebags don't last long.

    Personally, I prefer to buy a car or any high ticket item from a dealership rep than someone who actually owns it.

    Owners can be sleazy too.
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  • Profile picture of the author prvegas
    You can't always buy every product you promote but invest a little time to know about the products you sell so you are knowledgeable about most of them.

    Read the ad copy so you have a general knowledge about the product as you mention it in a post.

    If someone comments or email you asking a question you need to know something about it so you can reply to entice a sale.
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  • Profile picture of the author samsabir
    Going to such an extent to sell a product is important and ethical for a seller/marketer. You should try it so you can add on to the credibility of the product and know about what you aim to sell.
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    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by samsabir View Post

      Going to such an extent to sell a product is important and ethical for a seller/marketer. You should try it so you can add on to the credibility of the product and know about what you aim to sell.
      I agree. And I think every pharmacist should try every drug they sell, at least once. that way they will know more about the effects.

      Who's with me?!
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      • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I agree. And I think every pharmacist should try every drug they sell, at least once. that way they will know more about the effects.

        Who's with me?!
        Funnily enough, I've just come back from the pharmacist. I needed something for the stomach cramps I've been getting since trying that bird seed I was hoping to sell.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
        Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

        I agree. And I think every pharmacist should try every drug they sell, at least once. that way they will know more about the effects.

        Who's with me?!
        re: at least once
        You sir are obviously not a drug dealer. Worse, you are a salesman.

        re: Who's with me?!
        Why? Is it coin operated?
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      A major attraction for me in selling affiliate products is that you really don't need to know anything about them.

      I have never done a "product review", never bought or tried out any of the products I sell, or even had a use for them.

      In 20+ years of affiliate marketing I still just send traffic to product sales pages or offline referrals, and collect my money.

      How sleazy is that?
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  • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
    Your choice of the word "sleazy" framed your question for the group.

    I think it was a poor choice, unless you wanted to incite reactions. Which you did, so if that was your intent, then good job.

    We who work with our words every day, who use them to influence other people, become aware of how charged some language can be. By framing your question with your choice of sleazy, we see both knee jerk reactions, and well thought out responses.

    Some have inferred a moral dilemma, others bring an ethical issue with them.

    Long, long ago, I learned from my mommy, "judge not, lest you be judged": and I'm pretty sure she copped it from somewhere, but this response to my wondering why anyone would buy a cigar (I was very young, the smell offended me).

    Since then, I've seen all sorts of goofy, unusual, really sleazy even, products sold...everything from pet rocks, to ant farms, to stink bombs, and on and on, and even those stinky, smelly, fill the world stench Cuban cigars.

    Here is the thing. People spend THEIR money, on what they want.

    By calling something sleazy, you are bringing your judgement to the deal. Many of us might consider porn to be sleazy, but guys like Hugh Hefner and thousands of others have done all right.

    So to answer YOU, the feeling of sleaze lies within. Has nothing to do with any given product. I like the bird seed idea, I would sell it, without ever using it, but if you are speaking of just information products, then again, you and only your judgement will determine if it makes you feel sleazy, eh?

    GordonJ


    Originally Posted by Ben Scott Jr View Post

    As an affiliate marketer, there are so many options to choose from when it comes to selling products and many networks to choose from.

    It's very easy to go through Clickbank or some other network and choose the product you see that is very popular and pays a good commission.

    Do you believe it's important to try the product first and sell only after you tried it and you really believe in the product?

    Or maybe you only sell from reputable marketers that you trust even if you have not tried the product.

    Or maybe you just feel it's sleazy to sell a product you haven't tried.

    What do YOU think?
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve L
    Originally Posted by Ben Scott Jr View Post

    As an affiliate marketer, there are so many options to choose from when it comes to selling products and many networks to choose from.

    It's very easy to go through Clickbank or some other network and choose the product you see that is very popular and pays a good commission.

    Do you believe it's important to try the product first and sell only after you tried it and you really believe in the product?

    Or maybe you only sell from reputable marketers that you trust even if you have not tried the product.

    Or maybe you just feel it's sleazy to sell a product you haven't tried.

    What do YOU think?
    Absolutely! Trust is everything in business and life. Don't jeopardize your reputation just to earn a buck. It's never worth it in the long run.
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      Why absolutely?


      What's wrong with:


      Here's what I do... (and you describe what you do)... This is the product I use (and you give the name of the product you use).


      Here are 72 products like it. I've used none of these 72, but they're popular. You might like them. Or maybe not. But if you buy from my link, I make a commission.


      Originally Posted by Steve L View Post

      Absolutely! Trust is everything in business and life. Don't jeopardize your reputation just to earn a buck. It's never worth it in the long run.
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  • Profile picture of the author JoshFlake
    I don't think you have to necessarily buy, or even try, the product you are selling, especially if you are an affiliate for, or have reviews on, multiple brands or variations for similar products.

    For me, I just run products past the "Would I buy this product if I were in the market for one?" test. If after doing some research and reading other reviews I'm confident that the answer is yes, then I'm willing to sell that product. I never sell anything I wouldn't be willing to buy or that I don't believe in. The more you believe in a product the easier it is for you to sell. I also pay attention to the feedback I get. If I hear that multiple people bought the product and had bad experiences that I trust, I'll stop selling the product.
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  • Profile picture of the author King Manu
    I don't think it's sleazy.

    There are two situations where this works well.

    1. You have experience in your field.

    If I know my way around smartphones and technology, I don't need to own one to identify the quality of it. There are plenty of tools online that help you see what's good and what's not.

    If I watch reviews from other people, I can SEE how a product is better than the other one because of my experience. Something my visitors probably can't do.

    Or let's take the example of a person that usually goes to the gym, takes protein supplements, and has experience in nutrition. They can tell when a product is good or not just by looking at the list of ingredients. They don't need to try all of them.

    It's not hard to identify what is good and what's not if you are looking for it.

    Not to mention you can search for negative reviews for those products, and see what people complain about.
    Then you mention the shortcomings you find. Some think that if you point out flaws, people won't buy a product.
    That's wrong! People expect to find flaws.

    But what is a flaw for someone is nothing for others.

    For example, I might want a smartphone with great processing speed to play games on it, while I don't care about the resolution of the front camera.

    Therefore, if I find a con that says "it takes bad selfies" with a pro "apps work great", that is great news for me.

    2. You have experience/skill with reviews

    In my opinion, not everyone can get into the mindset of writing a review. You need to imagine yourself in all types of situations with that product. You need to see the advantages and disadvantages with minimum effort.

    You need to be able to honestly review a product, knowing that you can review more products and let the visitor decide what's best for them.

    Therefore, unless your intentions are sleazy, as "I'm going to showcase the good and hide the bad to make a sale", you have nothing to worry about.
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  • Profile picture of the author starbaby
    No because it depends on the product
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  • Profile picture of the author klixion
    Just read the reviews before selling them.
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  • Profile picture of the author newxxx
    many adult webmasters promote hundreds of websites with banner advertising and never join any of the sites they're promoting
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  • Profile picture of the author MikeFriedman
    Originally Posted by writeaway View Post

    Your mean Google's own official statements (and countless webmaster/search metric company feedback on E-A-T) https://webmasters.googleblog.com/20...e-updates.html are all wrong?

    Core updates reflect E-A-T.

    This is where this forum needs a huge facepalm GIF.

    ABSOLUTELY NOWHERE did Google ever say E-A-T was a part of their ranking algorithm. Nowhere.

    The E-A-T guidelines are part of the search quality rater's guide, not the Google algorithm. They are separate and completely different.
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  • Profile picture of the author cocurt
    Depends on your Values,The market you are in.It dpends
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  • Profile picture of the author Janice Sperry
    It is sleazy to sell sleazy products!
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  • You don't have to test every single product as is not realistic to do so.

    However, when there is a free service option you should try it as this is a good way to review the product and create content around it and get traffic!

    Our affiliate program promotes uptime monitoring services for which there is a free product and we like our partners to try it.

    Get in touch
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Darn it. I have forgotten what we were talking about. Again.
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    W A R N I N G - S P O I L E R - A L E R T
    The Best Source of Free Traffic is in This Very Forum.
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