Selling Hot Dogs To A Hungry Crowd

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I keep going back to this... a lesson taught by Gary Halbert.
You can have the very best hot dogs, but if you don't have a hungry crowd, you're screwed.

I got a call from a consulting client the other day.
He wanted to start a trade school for craftsmen... HVAC, drywall hanging, electricians, etc.
As far as easy money, I discussed with him how ... oh how... was he going to FIND this market. If you're selling a business management system to plumbers, you can find the plumbers mailing list and you can begin.
But how are you going to reach 19 to 25 year olds to teach them a trade?
Radio?
TV?
Your cost of sale is going to be through the roof.
Then how much can you charge these young folks? Do they have the money to cover your selling costs PLUS everything else too?
Not to mention the competition you've got from youtube channels teaching everything from how to build a boat to how to pour concrete.
FIND A HUNGRY CROWD.... then sell your hot dogs. GUARANTEED SUCCESS.
Just thinkin
Linwood
#crowd #dogs #hot #hungry #selling
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  • Profile picture of the author Medon
    To me, before you start preparing the hot dogs, you must have established that there is a hungry crowd that will consume them. If not, start it from the scratch. prepare just a few hot dogs and move around to find potential buyers. If you are doing a good job, the word of mouth will get you the fist client. Once you touch base, you will have the capital to market it on anypreferred channel.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    One way it is done today is you contact local retail providers in your geo and offer contract services. Examples: Lowe's Home Improvement (HVAC, landscaping, etc.), Locksmith Services (24 Hour Unlock).

    Tip: both companies already have "hungry crowds" that your business can establish near immediate leverage.

    Tip: Your business can operate non-competitively as a in-store vendor.

    HVAC and Locksmith customers need services "today" vs. "yesterday" and that is how you source "hungry crowds". Hotdogs? Not so much these days.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
    Originally Posted by Medon View Post

    To me, before you start preparing the hot dogs, you must have established that there is a hungry crowd that will consume them. If not, start it from the scratch. prepare just a few hot dogs and move around to find potential buyers. If you are doing a good job, the word of mouth will get you the fist client. Once you touch base, you will have the capital to market it on anypreferred channel.
    Good luck with that.
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  • For sure I would be interested in hot dogs.

    But how to reach me?

    My mind spins back to the great days of vaudeville -- an' an exotic dancer named Betty Schloupe.

    She was active in the Noo York area in the 20s, mostly dowin' chorus stuffs with othah gals who complemented her willowy 6' 2" frame.

    Anyways, she hooked up one time with Dickie The Saber -- a French knife throwah with a reputation for hair-raisin' shows.

    Guy had real talent an' precision, plus also a fine eye for showmanship.

    He nevah made a bad shot in 30 years, an' all the gals his whirlin' daggers framed trusted his skill implicitly.

    Which is why sumtimes he got his gals to dress in sumthin' othah than the usual glitzy skimpies.

    So he would have mebbe a show themed around huntin' bears.

    Lots of storytellin' gowin' on in the preamble, but it all set up the excitement of the main event bcs now the gal wearin' a provocative bear costoom showcased brave ol' Dickie savin' the town or huntin' his dinnah or sum othah exotic tale.

    Thing is, the costoom meant Dickie could load up his gals' thighs, arms an' waists with theatrical blood, an' his aim was so sure he could guarantee to sever the bags without harmin' actshwll flesh.

    Dependin' on the audience, he would work his show two ways.

    Version one, the blood was all part of the ursine story -- a theatrical stunt to add pure visyool allure.

    Version two, he'd play it like the gal been hit for real.

    Always made for cool publicity, an' Dickie an' his gals did real good with plenty variations on this theme.

    Anyways, back to hot dogs.

    Dickie the Saber be long gone now, but there gotta still be knife throwahs out there lookin' for exotic gals.

    An' bcs we now in the mixed up 2020s where jugglahs toss all kinds of froot an' kitchen utensils around, I figure the heirs to Dickie's talents could hurl most anythin' at a theatrically-clad gal out for fun.

    So ... anywan out there packin' forensically tossed hot dogs, ima catch 'em in my mouth.
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  • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
    Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

    But how are you going to reach 19 to 25 year olds to teach them a trade?
    Interesting post, a few years back a lot of trade schools in the area, cut back on certain classes because families preferred their children get a college education.

    Talked to a teacher at one of the schools and he said HVAC classes did not have a lot of the younger students. But most were in the Mid 20-30's who had started to settle down a little in life and wanted to get ahead or needed to support a young family. Instead of working in minimum wage jobs or cutting grass. The point is the target age may have changed.
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Originally Posted by DWolfe View Post

      Interesting post, a few years back a lot of trade schools in the area, cut back on certain classes because families preferred their children get a college education.

      Talked to a teacher at one of the schools and he said HVAC classes did not have a lot of the younger students. But most were in the Mid 20-30's who had started to settle down a little in life and wanted to get ahead or needed to support a young family. Instead of working in minimum wage jobs or cutting grass. The point is the target age may have changed.

      MR WOLFE,



      You have clear thinking. If this guy wants to be a success at his trade school business, I suspect he'll need GUTS and GAMBLE as much as marketing wisdom.

      Linwood
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  • Profile picture of the author Odahh
    instead of career tradesmen .. which already have well established paths to learn the skills .. a curriculem for building tiny homes ..that make sure they meet code ..

    there is a hungry crowd for tiny homes and many end up diy ..for much of the build which is where much of the saving come from ..

    and if your signing up people with the dream of building their own tiny home .. many will never even try .. or will take 7 other courses before they build ..
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    • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
      Originally Posted by Odahh View Post

      instead of career tradesmen .. which already have well established paths to learn the skills .. a curriculem for building tiny homes ..that make sure they meet code ..

      there is a hungry crowd for tiny homes and many end up diy ..for much of the build which is where much of the saving come from ..

      and if your signing up people with the dream of building their own tiny home .. many will never even try .. or will take 7 other courses before they build ..
      The "hungry crowd" concept is to put your product in front of your "hungry crowd." How do you do that with tiny homes? Display the homes on a lot, advertise and wait (hope) the "hungry crowd" will show up and spend money?

      Wouldn't it be better to go to the hungry crowd and display the homes?

      What about the evictions from apartments, homes, etc. that are happening around the U.S. right now? Seems to me people in that situation may be a "hungry crowd" aka the target market. Where are they located? The unemployment office, government services, homeless shelters, etc. What are the chances these people have the funds to purchase a tiny home?

      Wouldn't it be better to select a different product targeted at people that have money to spend?
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      • Profile picture of the author Odahh
        Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

        T

        What about the evictions from apartments, homes, etc. that are happening around the U.S. right now? Seems to me people in that situation may be a "hungry crowd" aka the target market. Where are they located? The unemployment office, government services, homeless shelters, etc. What are the chances these people have the funds to purchase a tiny home?

        Wouldn't it be better to select a different product targeted at people that have money to spend?
        well my post was aimed at people who want to build a tiny home or do most of the work .. but may not have all the skills needed ..

        with the situation you pointed out the interest in tiny homes or ..people building their own tiny homes will increase .. main market would be the people who have to move back in to their parents homes and regulations and code allow for the building of a small dwelling on the property
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        • Profile picture of the author Matthew Stanley
          Not sure the most efficient way to find them *right now*, but it feels to me like in the next 5 years, 3D printing and creative developers like those from this article will make cheap/small homes a reality for a whole swath of people (who may otherwise not have explored home ownership)

          http://www.fastcompany.com/3056129/t...cer-than-yours
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by AdmanMrWoo View Post

    He wanted to start a trade school for craftsmen... HVAC, drywall hanging, electricians, etc.
    As far as easy money, I discussed with him how ... oh how... was he going to FIND this market. If you're selling a business management system to plumbers, you can find the plumbers mailing list and you can begin.
    But how are you going to reach 19 to 25 year olds to teach them a trade?
    Radio?
    TV?
    This is an example of businesses that sound the same but are completely different.

    Teaching skills to people already in business VS finding people who want to start that business VS finding people who want to learn the skills to get a job.

    If I had an already established trade school to sell for, I'd advertise seminars for people who want to learn that skill, and just pitch the attendees. I've seen that approach work before. But you are attracting a diverse group. Maybe one out of 30 will actually invest in the training. The rest are just looking for a job.


    I have a little experience with this.

    About 25 years ago, when I was experiencing my first major successes with a retail store selling vacuum cleaners, I decided to create a course for Vacuum Cleaner Repair that anyone could run out of their home. It would include the advertising needed, the sources of parts (with catalogs) and the training needed for the majority of repairs. It was a series of videos.

    I had the genius idea to create the entire course, before I had done any research.

    I ran about $5,000 in newspaper and magazine ads (in DIY and craftsman magazines). And I started to get enquirers. Not.....one....sale of the course. The course was $995. I had brilliantly printed up 100 complete courses....because obviously...I was going to make millions.


    This was before I knew about lists....of ...buyers. If I had any brains at all, I would have bought the list of buyers of small engine repair courses., and other courses like that. Today, I would also be selling with Youtube videos and PPC ads.

    End of that tale? The courses eventually became so out of date that I threw it all in the dumpster. Maybe $20,000 and three months of hard work....gone.

    This is what happens when you know about your core business....but know nothing about marketing. Even selling and advertising isn't the same as marketing a course to teach skills.
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    • Profile picture of the author Odahh
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      This is an example of businesses that sound the same but are completely different.

      Teaching skills to people already in business VS finding people who want to start that business VS finding people who want to learn the skills to get a job.

      If I had an already established trade school to sell for, I'd advertise seminars for people who want to learn that skill, and just pitch the attendees. I've seen that approach work before. But you are attracting a diverse group. Maybe one out of 30 will actually invest in the training. The rest are just looking for a job.


      Is.
      the case with a technical school .. is it really requires a sizable up front investment on a building .. equipment and certified instructors .. pricing and financial assistance access..

      people don't leave school and start their own business in the trades .. the usual get enough training in the trade school to get a job as an apprentice .. which can last 3-5 years .. or more ..

      and there are many businesses states and cities require certifications to start .. so you can't just call yourself a barber one day and start cutting hair legally .. many places ..

      that might work the same with starting a trade school ..
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    • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
      Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

      This is an example of businesses that sound the same but are completely different.

      Teaching skills to people already in business VS finding people who want to start that business VS finding people who want to learn the skills to get a job.

      If I had an already established trade school to sell for, I'd advertise seminars for people who want to learn that skill, and just pitch the attendees. I've seen that approach work before. But you are attracting a diverse group. Maybe one out of 30 will actually invest in the training. The rest are just looking for a job.


      I have a little experience with this.

      About 25 years ago, when I was experiencing my first major successes with a retail store selling vacuum cleaners, I decided to create a course for Vacuum Cleaner Repair that anyone could run out of their home. It would include the advertising needed, the sources of parts (with catalogs) and the training needed for the majority of repairs. It was a series of videos.

      I had the genius idea to create the entire course, before I had done any research.

      I ran about $5,000 in newspaper and magazine ads (in DIY and craftsman magazines). And I started to get enquirers. Not.....one....sale of the course. The course was $995. I had brilliantly printed up 100 complete courses....because obviously...I was going to make millions.


      This was before I knew about lists....of ...buyers. If I had any brains at all, I would have bought the list of buyers of small engine repair courses., and other courses like that. Today, I would also be selling with Youtube videos and PPC ads.

      End of that tale? The courses eventually became so out of date that I threw it all in the dumpster. Maybe $20,000 and three months of hard work....gone.

      This is what happens when you know about your core business....but know nothing about marketing. Even selling and advertising isn't the same as marketing a course to teach skills.

      YOU GET IT CLAUDE,

      I opened this thread with the idea of "THE MARKET ITSELF IS MORE IMPORTANT TO YOUR SUCCESS THAN THE MARKETING."



      Can you find the market?

      Is the market growing, shrinking or stagnant?

      How many competitors do you have?

      Who is the biggest and what's his deal?

      What is the attrition rate?
      What technology is coming down the road that you can take advantage of ahead of your competition... or what tech is going to knock you off your saddle?


      and more questions...



      The market will bless your marketing... or not.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    So - your point is that nothing works? We're doomed?

    that make sure they meet code ..
    Not that simple - they can't meet code in many places until the codes are changed. It is happening -but a slow process.

    the case with a technical school .. is it really requires a sizable up front investment on a building .. equipment and certified instructors .. pricing and financial assistance access..
    Would you not expect to pay for training? I would - and the cost is far below 4 years of college at any school. More importantly, tech schools produce tradesmen - and they are in demand.

    I wonder if any trades still offer apprenticeships....used to be popular many years ago.


    edit: darned thread title! I opted out of grilled chicken for dinner - and ate hot dogs....
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    Saving one dog will not change the world - but for that one dog, the world will change forever.
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    • Profile picture of the author Odahh
      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      So - your point is that nothing works? We're doomed?


      Not that simple - they can't meet code in many places until the codes are changed. It is happening -but a slow process.

      Would you not expect to pay for training? I would - and the cost is far below 4 years of college at any school. More importantly, tech schools produce tradesmen - and they are in demand.


      I wonder if any trades still offer apprenticeships....used to be popular many years ago.
      i was talking about the investment in starting up a technical school .. as the op was mentioning ..

      and yes the initial training from a tech school or a union hall..then a time of paid apprenticeship is better than going to collage for many .. but the focus the last 40 years has been putting kids into college .. not trades ..

      asfor tiny homes .. places that are friendly to tiny homes on foundations .. are Usually places people might be able to buy an acre of residential land for 10,000 or much less ..or if talking about tiny homes on wheels ..they are basically custom rvs and campers ..which should meet those code .. and the laws in communitie for sleeping in them ..

      big country .. if you want to life a certain way ..there are many choices for where one can go .. and many choice that may not work .. the lower 48 is like 48 differnt small countries and more like 70 where big state can have different rules in one part than another .. ..
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  • Profile picture of the author Naheed
    sure! you know the product (its a hot dog).... you know the crowd
    (it's a hungry one). then tell me if there are also a bunch of other hot dog sellers then how your cart is going to stand out from the crowd. How would you identify how many people are craving hunger for hot dogs only? if you haven't decided something yet then try to reconsider your competitive market, product demand and target audience to have a competitive-edge over others.
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    • Profile picture of the author Odahh
      Originally Posted by Naheed View Post

      sure! you know the product (its a hot dog).... you know the crowd
      (it's a hungry one). then tell me if there are also a bunch of other hot dog sellers then how your cart is going to stand out from the crowd. How would you identify how many people are craving hunger for hot dogs only? if you haven't decided something yet then try to reconsider your competitive market, product demand and target audience to have a competitive-edge over others.
      start with realizing the other people selling from hot dog cart are not your competition ..in a city with food cart .. there are probably a hundred option for little restaurants .. or at least 20 and other options to get food ...

      if over the year it the three guys with carts have been on different corners of an intersection for years covering the lunchtime foot traffic ..and some new guy with a cart sets up on the fourth corner and iyt seems to hurt business ..the three guy resort to baseball bat to handel the new competition..or complaints to the board of health to get the new person shut down ..
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      • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
        Originally Posted by Odahh View Post

        start with realizing the other people selling from hot dog cart are not your competition ..in a city with food cart .. there are probably a hundred option for little restaurants .. or at least 20 and other options to get food ...

        if over the year it the three guys with carts have been on different corners of an intersection for years covering the lunchtime foot traffic ..and some new guy with a cart sets up on the fourth corner and iyt seems to hurt business ..the three guy resort to baseball bat to handel the new competition..or complaints to the board of health to get the new person shut down ..
        That is a "real world fact" although not the point.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jeffery
      Originally Posted by Naheed View Post

      sure! you know the product (its a hot dog).... you know the crowd
      (it's a hungry one). then tell me if there are also a bunch of other hot dog sellers then how your cart is going to stand out from the crowd. How would you identify how many people are craving hunger for hot dogs only? if you haven't decided something yet then try to reconsider your competitive market, product demand and target audience to have a competitive-edge over others.

      "Hotdog" is just an example to explain the concept of the "Hungry Crowd." The product could be umbrellas on a rainy day, bottled water in a flood zone, etc. The product does not matter. What matters is sourcing and selling anything that fulfills an immediate need for people with money to spend.
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      • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
        Originally Posted by Jeffery View Post

        "Hotdog" is just an example to explain the concept of the "Hungry Crowd." The product could be umbrellas on a rainy day, bottled water in a flood zone, etc. The product does not matter. What matters is sourcing and selling anything that fulfills an immediate need for people with money to spend.
        What MATTERS is sourcing and selling ANYTHING that fulfills an immediate need for people with money to spend.

        Well Jeffery, you just gave us the one thing. (I'm thinking of the great Jack Palance in the movie City Slickers, who gave the tenderfoots his philosophy, ONE THING).

        In Claude's post about his creating a course for vacuum repair, we see a lesson which gets repeated over, and over and over again...either falling in love with an idea or putting the cart before the horse. We see it everyday at the WF.

        But, with your ONE thing on the top of mind, start at the end.

        PEOPLE WITH MONEY TO SPEND
        with
        an IMMEDIATE NEED (want, desire, hunger)

        and then SUPPLY it.

        Each step has its own pieces and parts, but it is the basic gist of it all. So thanks "Curly" for giving us the ONE thing we need to keep in mind before we go off half-cocked with our powder all wet.

        GordonJ

        PS As for sourcing, either acquire or create.
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  • Profile picture of the author AdmanMrWoo
    One way to find a "hungry crowd"... pay attention to changing gov laws.

    If a law is coming down the pike, and many will be effected by this law... and you can... get in front of the law and buyers will be "forced" to buy from you.

    Example: If some law is coming that says YOU MUST BUY CAR INSURANCE... it would be smart to become an insurance seller. (But not now, the insurance market is flooded with sellers.)

    Example: If a water heater manufacturer is proven to build and sell defective water heaters... and a gov law says the water heater must be replaced, and the manufacturer has to pay for it... you'd be smart to jump in front of the action... and tell home owners THEY MUST replace the water heater and NOW is the time to do it, as the maker has to pay.



    Good Marketing is sometimes riding on the coattails of other movements.

    Just thinkin'
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