Is your transformation strategy even a strategy?

by WarriorForum.com Administrator
5 replies
A new article on Marketing Land asks whether your supposed transformation strategy is actually a proper strategy in reality.



Business strategy usually gets created by senior executives, then passed down like tablets of stone. Five-year plans used to work ok back when things changed more slowly and when disruption either didn't happen or you had time to see its approach - but, as the author points out, things have changed. He says lack of a well-defined and well-communicated strategy is one of the most common reasons for failed digital or other business transformations. That's down to inconsistent leadership, conflicting goals and initiatives, and creates resistance to change.

Frameworks around which strategic plans get built are usually variations on a theme, but they should be an iterative exercise, a bit like agile software development. Companies need to revisit them regularly and correct their course when required.

Look Within and Communicate in Plain Terms

Companies frequently think they've got a strategy when what they really have is just a goal. It's a formula for winning and takes no heed of whether or not the organization provides value, but true strategy starts with discovery. Once you've looked inward and armed yourself with the right information, you can start asking the right questions
  • Who are our ideal customers? What problem are we solving for them?
  • Why are we uniquely qualified to earn their business vs our competitors?
  • What specific capabilities will we need to develop in order for the plan to succeed?
  • What in the organization needs to change to support the strategy?
  • What are the top two or three things that have to go right for this strategy to work?
  • What could go wrong and how might we overcome it?
  • If we pursue this strategy, what are we deciding not to do?
  • What does success look like, and how will we know if we're going in the right direction?
  • How can we test our assumptions and pilot the concept?

When you compile internal communications, be specific and don't use jargon. Use actionable language instead, and stick to the plan. As the author puts it, "if 95% of employees don't know where you're going, there's a 100% chance you'll end up someplace else.
#strategy #transformation
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author Jacobharry123
    Interesting one
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11636017].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Medon
    I concur with yiu and just want to add that most managers will monitor and pursue their goal and then formulate a strategy afer they achieve their goal.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11636075].message }}
  • I concur with yiu and just want to add that most managers will monitor and pursue their goal and then formulate a strategy afer they achieve their goal.
    So true. The bigger the company, often the more reverse-engineered the "strategy."
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11637987].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Medon
      Originally Posted by Matthew Stanley View Post

      So true. The bigger the company, often the more reverse-engineered the "strategy."
      Sure! that is the term I was looking for but which had escaped my memory. Most of these innovative firms you hear about rely on reverse engineering to remain at the top
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11638240].message }}
  • yeah - the corporate communications / business copywriting aspect to this rings especially true.

    The one area I'd add is in the vein of Taleb's "Via Negativa:" What/who are we endeavoring to *not* be/do/attract
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11637988].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics