Can we reach Gen Z and younger people more effectively by concentrating on the spaces they value?

by WarriorForum.com Administrator
6 replies
This article on Adweek advocates that brands need a community-first approach to advertising. Do you agree or disagree? I'd be interested in your thoughts on this, and I think it's a burning question for many marketers.



The author is Sarah Loos, and she is the Head of Sales for the Americas at Twitch. She leads the ad sales team in building lasting client relationships--helping brands across industries adapt to more valuable, interactive ad experiences that are tailored to Twitch's passionate and unique community.

She argues that community should be at the center of every brand's advertising strategy. But do you agree? And what exactly does community mean today? And what does it mean for brands?

Communities form around shared values and experiences. The shows you watch, the video games you play, the products you buy, the places you frequent and even the stars you follow can make up the communities to which you belong. Proximity was once one of the most important factors in how--and where--communities formed. Loos says that's no longer the case.

Communities now form online, too, and these groups are just as important as communities that form offline. This is especially true for Gen Z and younger generations. With social media, smartphones, connected devices, messaging apps and livestreams abound, these young people have access to more ways than ever to connect and stay connected with one another.

We direct just as much emotion, creativity and energy into our online communities as our offline communities (and in some cases, even more). With emotion and creativity at the heart of advertising, it's an exciting time for brands who wish to strengthen their relationships with consumers.

The author then offers some things for brands to keep in mind when engaging younger consumers and participating in their communities.

Align with consumers' shared values

Today's consumers have more channels than ever to broadcast and amplify their values, and they'll now call upon brands to share their values, too. But make sure your brand's actions reflect those values.

Members of Gen Z are smart. They've grown up with technology at their fingertips and screens in front of their eyes. They have access to an incredible amount of information that has helped them become smarter consumers very early in life. These consumers don't just have the receipts. They have the reports and firsthand accounts from members of their communities, too.

Support--don't infiltrate--communities

Younger adults are more likely to expect brands and advertisers to be inclusive, reflect their identities in their marketing and advertising, and be supportive of their interests and communities. But you need to do so authentically and align the community's needs with your brand's needs.

Find ways to show these groups that you know who they are, what gets them excited, and what makes them feel special. For example, you can show your support for members of a fitness or wellness community by celebrating big milestones. Whether you're an athletics brand, a food brand or a beauty brand, you can help members of communities such as these by sending a thoughtful message or a small gift that shows you recognize how important their accomplishments are.

The same can be done for accomplishments in a competitive video game or role playing quest within the livestreaming community, or even a new record for the number of books read in a literary community.

Follow the creator's lead

Gen Z has grown up surrounded by the concept of influence. It's in their faces and on their screens nearly all the time. Their influencers, however, may not be the same types of influencers millennials or Gen Xers looked up to. To younger consumers, celebrities are born online--in short videos with catchy beats and livestreams that capture exciting moments in real time.

Creators are at the heart of thriving digital communities, and working with the right creators can both strengthen a brand's relationship with a community and strengthen the communities themselves. Creators are experts when it comes to their communities, and they know what does and doesn't work for their followers. There is no "one size fits all" solution when it comes to engaging communities, and creators know this better than anyone.

When it comes to working with creators and engaging their communities, the most successful brands truly collaborate with creators and empower them to, well, be creative. We are in one of the most exciting eras of influencer marketing, and brands can learn so much about cultivating community from the creators who do it every day. I know this first hand from my experience at Twitch working with incredibly passionate creators.

A community-led approach to advertising is about helping fuel connections. It's about sometimes doing a little more listening and helping amplify important voices in a community. It's about showing support in authentic ways and following through on your promises.

The bottom line

Will this approach guarantee good results? What are your own experiences targeting these demographics, and what has and hasn't worked for you? Please spill the beans!
#concentrating #effectively #gen #people #reach #spaces #younger
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris-
    Most people assume that "going viral" is a lot of individuals independently liking something.

    In reality, that's almost never the case . . . what really happens is one or more big influencers endorse a piece of content, and their millions of followers are influenced by that.

    A secret that few people know is that you can simply PAY big influencers to endorse your content!

    You have to find influencers who fit with what you're promoting, but if you find a good match, it's simply a matter of paying them, and you "go viral" (if you do it right).

    The biggest influencers charge 6 figures for this, but it's possible to start small, paying under $100, and, if you do everything right, leverage the results and reinvest over and over, to get yourself up to the big end of the market.

    There are a lot of websites which put promoters and influencers together, or you can contact the influencers (or their agents) directly.

    Chris
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    • Profile picture of the author WF- Enzo
      Administrator
      Yes. Behind the scenes, big influencers are paid to make it look as if it went viral from the get go with minimal followers.



      Originally Posted by Chris- View Post

      Most people assume that "going viral" is a lot of individuals independently liking something.

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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    "Gen Z and younger people" is confusing....Gen Z is 10-25 yrs of age....how much younger would you target?

    I noticed a post yesterday generalizing about 'boomers' and 'millennials' and I wonder how often someone looks up the defined ages of the various groups.

    Clearly, not all baby boomers are retired...and GenZ is a teen and young adult market.

    Baby Boomeers:
    Born 1946-1964 - currently 58-76 yrs old
    (71.6 million in the US)

    Gen X: 1965-1980 - currently 42-57 yrs old
    (65.2 million in the US)

    Millennials:
    Gen Y: 1981 - 1994-6. 26-41 yrs old
    *Gen Y.1 - 25-29 yrs old (32 million people in US)
    *Gen Y.2 - 30-40 yrs old (42 million people in US)

    Gen Z" 1997-2012 - currently 10-25 yrs old
    (nearly 68 million in the US)
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    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      thanks Kay for posting this, I have some comments on your breakdown, but first, for WF Enzo...

      What is the WF breakdown of these different generations? Of the alledged over a million members you have here, how do they fit into these groups? I think that would be useful to all of us, don't you?

      Anyhow.

      Let me start with BOOMERS, cause I is one. But so is my younger brother, althugh he is late boomer...anyone born after 1958 came of age (18) post draft. By the time he was out of high school, there was no mandatory military service...and believe me, it makes a huge difference. My older brother and I were faced with the draft.

      Now very early boomers, actually were too old (mostly) for the Vietnam war and they served during peace time or the cold war. So, when you TARGET boomers, and you group us all in one big pile to sell your stuff too, you are making a big mistake if you think we all share the same ideas, or mindset, or have the same motivations. BIG MISTAKE.

      As for the OP, reaching mills or z's...maybe we don't need to for now. Planty of money still in boomers (we ain't all dead) and X's, and in fact, they hold a lot of the spendable income in their hands...while some working Z's, still rely on their parents for support.

      I prefer to TARGET people, no matter their age, who are appropriate for the goods or services I have to offer. Just looking at numbers of groups, doesn't do much...we were called the "pig in the python" and now that the python is pooping many of us out, our scat still has some value left.

      And even within the new and coming generations, will they not also have human basic needs and wants? Just saying, the article and your question about DEMOGRAPHICS, where the dollar meets road, niching into the demographic will do most marketers a better job than just lumping people together.

      GordonJ


      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      "Gen Z and younger people" is confusing....Gen Z is 10-25 yrs of age....how much younger would you target?

      I noticed a post yesterday generalizing about 'boomers' and 'millennials' and I wonder how often someone looks up the defined ages of the various groups.

      Clearly, not all baby boomers are retired...and GenZ is a teen and young adult market.

      Baby Boomeers:
      Born 1946-1964 - currently 58-76 yrs old
      (71.6 million in the US)

      Gen X: 1965-1980 - currently 42-57 yrs old
      (65.2 million in the US)

      Millennials:
      Gen Y: 1981 - 1994-6. 26-41 yrs old
      *Gen Y.1 - 25-29 yrs old (32 million people in US)
      *Gen Y.2 - 30-40 yrs old (42 million people in US)

      Gen Z" 1997-2012 - currently 10-25 yrs old
      (nearly 68 million in the US)
      Signature

      No sig for you.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11721005].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author DABK
        I have relatives that are in age between 13 and 87... Many. So, I have a few in each generation. More interestingly, I have some at the beginning, at the middle, and at the end of a given generation.


        Because of that, and a bit more, I've concluded that a generation is too long of a time span, too broad of a category to use.


        It's like with niches: losing weight is a generation. But inside the losing weight group, there are the ones with bad knees, the ones with asthma and diabetes, the ones who need to lose 240 lbs or be dead by the end of the year, the ones who want to lose 5 lbs to fit into their wedding dress.


        Turns out, the same goes with generations. There are Gen-Z's who're lazy but smart, lazy and undereducated, overweight, pissed off at life, the ones who have a great job, the ones who had cancer at 4...


        It's a nice-enough article but why are we not yet aware that, if you have a large enough group, you will have sub-groups with different, sometimes diametrically-opposed views, desires, life-experiences?



        Originally Posted by GordonJ View Post

        thanks Kay for posting this, I have some comments on your breakdown, but first, for WF Enzo...

        What is the WF breakdown of these different generations? Of the alledged over a million members you have here, how do they fit into these groups? I think that would be useful to all of us, don't you?

        Anyhow.

        Let me start with BOOMERS, cause I is one. But so is my younger brother, althugh he is late boomer...anyone born after 1958 came of age (18) post draft. By the time he was out of high school, there was no mandatory military service...and believe me, it makes a huge difference. My older brother and I were faced with the draft.

        Now very early boomers, actually were too old (mostly) for the Vietnam war and they served during peace time or the cold war. So, when you TARGET boomers, and you group us all in one big pile to sell your stuff too, you are making a big mistake if you think we all share the same ideas, or mindset, or have the same motivations. BIG MISTAKE.

        As for the OP, reaching mills or z's...maybe we don't need to for now. Planty of money still in boomers (we ain't all dead) and X's, and in fact, they hold a lot of the spendable income in their hands...while some working Z's, still rely on their parents for support.

        I prefer to TARGET people, no matter their age, who are appropriate for the goods or services I have to offer. Just looking at numbers of groups, doesn't do much...we were called the "pig in the python" and now that the python is pooping many of us out, our scat still has some value left.

        And even within the new and coming generations, will they not also have human basic needs and wants? Just saying, the article and your question about DEMOGRAPHICS, where the dollar meets road, niching into the demographic will do most marketers a better job than just lumping people together.

        GordonJ
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11721019].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author socialentry
    Can we reach Gen Z and younger people more effectively by concentrating on the spaces they value?
    No. Duh .
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11721016].message }}
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