Hi-ticket and low-ticket

28 replies
I was asked recently by a friend on how to start his online marketing journey. Thinking about the offer, when I started my IM journey I chose to sell low-ticket because I thought it would be easier to make a business out of it...However in the last years I focused on Hi-ticket and my numbers grew massively, what do you think of this? Was I able to make it work the hi-ticket because I grew a nice foundation before with low-ticket? If you had to start over again, how would you start hi or low?
#hiticket #lowticket
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
    I think there's more to it than just the price point ... For example I think it's important for a Person/Marketer to choose and/or create a Product that they really believe in ― and that they're passionate about ... (Rather than just because it's a higher price point.)

    My success with SEO only happened when I started promoting Products that I believed in.

    [Added=] I think it really depends on the Business Model ― there are People making fortunes with "low-ticket" Products.
    Signature
    "Each problem has hidden in it an opportunity so powerful that it literally dwarfs the problem. The greatest success stories were created by people who recognized a problem and turned it into an opportunity."―Joseph Sugarman
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725027].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
      Originally Posted by Jonathan 2.0 View Post

      I think there's more to it than just the price point
      Quite so. In fact price point might be one of the least important considerations.

      Pricing is largely market dependent, product dependent, customer dependent, and offer dependent. And that's without considering factors such as seller authority and credibility.

      What any business has to take into account is the profit margin per product sold - and from that, the number and frequency of sales needed to generate an acceptable overall net profit. That is, after all operating and promotional expenses are factored in.

      Claude has illustrated the standard digital product business model, but for most online businesses, it usually isn't a question of starting low and graduating to high. You can have long-term success selling just low ticket items if you have a cost-effective means of accessing enough buyers. Of course, you could then funnel those buyers into higher profit offers, depending on the market and your seller/buyer relationship.
      Signature


      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725035].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
        Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

        Quite so. In fact price point might be one of the least important considerations.
        Sure. I think for many People starting out ― there's more to it than just selling High-Ticket Products.

        Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

        Pricing is largely market dependent, product dependent, customer dependent, and offer dependent. And that's without considering factors such as seller authority and credibility.
        Yup. Great point: I can't argue with that.

        Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

        What any business has to take into account is the profit margin per product sold - and from that, the number and frequency of sales needed to generate an acceptable overall net profit. That is, after all operating and promotional expenses are factored in.
        You're right.

        Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

        Claude has illustrated the standard digital product business mode but for most online businesses, it usually isn't a question of starting low and graduating to high. You can have long-term success selling just low ticket items if you have a cost-effective means of accessing enough buyers. Of course, you could then funnel those buyers into higher profit offers, depending on the market and your seller/buyer relationship.
        Personally I don't think it's the "Standard digital product business" ... However generally speaking I think it was great advice. And yeah, I agree for many Business Models offering more Products to their Buyer List can be super-successful.
        Signature
        "Each problem has hidden in it an opportunity so powerful that it literally dwarfs the problem. The greatest success stories were created by people who recognized a problem and turned it into an opportunity."―Joseph Sugarman
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725037].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post


        Claude has illustrated the standard digital product business model, but for most online businesses, it usually isn't a question of starting low and graduating to high. You can have long-term success selling just low ticket items if you have a cost-effective means of accessing enough buyers. Of course, you could then funnel those buyers into higher profit offers, depending on the market and your seller/buyer relationship.
        I've seen guys start with a free webinar (maybe a couple hours long) selling a $5,000 course cold, and make a large sum of money.

        I used to speak at free events for an hour and sell a $4,000 service to between 10-50% of the room. (The smaller the group, the higher the percentage buys) But if they had all already bought something from me for $5...more of them would have bought.

        And then there are people who simply sell books for $15 each, and do OK.

        Frankly, I think it's where you feel comfortable, and what you have to offer.

        Some marketers would just never ask for more than $50 for anything, no matter what it was. But I can tell you it's a heck of a lot easier selling one $4,000 offer than selling 200 $20 books.
        Signature
        One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

        "Those who know that they are profound strive for clarity. Those who would like to seem profound to the crowd strive for obscurity" Friedrich Nietzsche
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725238].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
          Originally Posted by Claude Whitacre View Post

          Frankly, I think it's where you feel comfortable, and what you have to offer.
          Yep. I probably should have said "a" standard digital product business model. The one that captures an email address using a low price offer to get customers into a sales funnel.

          Now that we know it's a ghostwriting service being discussed, I would almost always recommend starting with the rate you mean to keep - or at least in the same ball park.
          Signature


          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725315].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by Artkantos View Post

    I was asked recently by a friend on how to start his online marketing journey. Thinking about the offer, when I started my IM journey I chose to sell low-ticket because I thought it would be easier to make a business out of it...However in the last years I focused on Hi-ticket and my numbers grew massively, what do you think of this? Was I able to make it work the hi-ticket because I grew a nice foundation before with low-ticket? If you had to start over again, how would you start hi or low?
    It depends on what you think is High ticket or Low ticket.

    I don't know if you grew a nice foundation before the pitch or not.

    Me? I'd start with a VERY low ticket, maybe $5. That's low enough to be purely an impulse buy, and it gets them to use a credit card to buy from you. Frankly, that offer is just to build a list of buyers.

    After that? I've seen successful $5,000 or $10,000 offers made to that list of buyers.
    Signature
    One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

    "Those who know that they are profound strive for clarity. Those who would like to seem profound to the crowd strive for obscurity" Friedrich Nietzsche
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725028].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Haroon Ballim
    Its about the offer . The content . There is the perception that it takes the same amount of effort to generate a sale , so why not concentrate on high ticket . Actually it takes more effort to generate a high Ticket sale . The rewards can be greater once you get the hang of it , and have the advertising dollars to spend .

    Low ticket items can often give you the confidence that Internet marketing is a viable option as a side business . Graduating to higher ticket sale items can than make it a full time income .

    I would say staret low ticket . Get some money in and than use that money to focus on high ticket sales
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725029].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Artkantos
    There are pros and cons in both options, but my vote goes to hi-ticket (above 1-2k$), at the end of the day it's about market, offer and traffic and you have to make those three work for a 10$ sale or a 2000$.

    Obviously a 2k$ sale is way harder that a 10$ sale, but IMO, way easier than 200 sales of 10$...And also makes sense the effort to sale through a (video)call. If you have a skill and you can really solve a problem for a certain avatar, you don't need much infrastructure to start doing hi-ticket sales
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725033].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    If you can SELL, you can sell anything. If you can't, you can't. If you know what you are doing, high end buyers are easier to work with...if you don't know what you are doing, they'll spot that in a minute.

    The most successful marketers I've known over the years don't worry about "high vs low"....they start with low $$ products, build experience and sales and lists....


    They will sell you a $7 report a couple times.....then recommend a $20 ebook.....then a $49 product.....a$67 ebook.... a $99 info product or software....they lead their lists up the ladder to $1000 products and $10k coaching offers. Basic funnel marketing.


    They overcome price resistance one step at a time....building lists, skills and credibility along the way.
    Signature
    Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world changes forever for that one dog.
    ***
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725036].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Artkantos
    I get what you're saying, but people have to start somewhere...I have seen many people to overthink the offer for months! The guy is a great writer, he knows how Twitter works and he wants to offer his services as a ghost writer, grow accounts etcetera, so IMO he should go for hi-ticket, you can do done-for-you and you don't need much to start, you can start organic and with one client you're in the business. I think is the best way for him to learn on the fly

    Ofc he will do whatever he wants depending on how he gets out of bed haha but we had a conversation about this yesterday and I think it was a nice debate to have!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725049].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
      Originally Posted by Artkantos View Post

      The guy is a great writer, he knows how Twitter works and he wants to offer his services as a ghost writer, grow accounts etcetera, so IMO he should go for hi-ticket, you can do done-for-you and you don't need much to start, you can start organic and with one client you're in the business. I think is the best way for him to learn on the fly
      Why didn't you mention this in your original post? Using terms like high ticket and low ticket suggests a product - and there are countless ways to "start an online marketing journey".

      Offering a service is a different ball game. You really want to start as you mean to go on. It can be done, but it's much more difficult to raise your prices down the line without antagonizing past buyers - most of whom you ought to be nurturing as repeat clients.
      Signature


      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725055].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      Originally Posted by Artkantos View Post

      I was asked recently by a friend on how to start his online marketing journey.

      Thinking about the offer, when I started my IM journey I chose to sell low-ticket because I thought it would be easier to make a business out of it...However in the last years I focused on Hi-ticket and my numbers grew massively, what do you think of this? Was I able to make it work the hi-ticket because I grew a nice foundation before with low-ticket? If you had to start over again, how would you start hi or low?

      ALONG WITH:

      The guy is a great writer,
      he knows how Twitter works and he wants to offer his services as a ghost writer, grow accounts etcetera,
      so IMO he should go for hi-ticket,
      you can do done-for-you and you don't need much to start, you can start organic and with one client you're in the business. I think is the best way for him to learn on the fly

      Ofc he will do whatever he wants depending on how he gets out of bed haha but we had a conversation about this yesterday and I think it was a nice debate to have!
      So, maybe this:

      ... at the end of the day the key is to understand what are the customer pains or dreams and solve them the best way possible. This can be through product and services but also with free content, resources, share some insights, etcetera. The better and deeper de positive impact in your audience/community, the more your business grows. Hopefully someone new can get some value out of this

      Like, maybe your friend the great writer?

      A high ticket writing job would be like the one taken on by Mark Manson and his collab with Will Smith. That probably at 6 figures. Ten to 25k is not unusual for a ghost written bio of a business/celeb for 'great' writers, those more common.

      No one has ever called me a great writer and I would metaphorically kick then in the shins if they did. But I am just good enough to have sustained a 40 year hacks writing career, and having written daily for over 50 years, here are my thoughts on this matter:

      EVERY writer, should have their own products in addition to any services they may offer.

      You have already said to address their pain and/or dreams, so what would these be for him?

      I can only address my personal experience or from direct experience with others, as opposed to third party hear-say regarding low vs. so called high ticket.

      It is always my preference to begin with a definition, so as to avoid misunderstanding and confusion, but thats just me. In commercial Real Estate, many agents I worked with considered a commission of anything over 30k a high ticket, which usually meant RE selling for mid six figures or more.

      So one man's big ticket is another man's scratch off.

      My latest report called TIDAL WAVE sold for 7 dollars. I would say LOW ticket. One of the first people to buy it was a new Warrior, and another one was a customer on my list for over 21 years.

      The new Warrior has just been exposed to my work, whereas the LIFETIME VALUE OF MY CUSTOMER for over 20 years has been over a thousand dollars.

      We hack writers have many different models to follow. I CHOOSE to do a low cost item, a so-called NO Brainer for 7 bux, or a should I/shouldn't I/oh what the heck...item for up to 19.95. I will do about one twenty dollar info product a quarter (every 3 months) and in between offer a couple of NO BRAINER reports or HOTSHEETS. Then normally, around the HOLIDAYs, I put out a special at about 25 dollars.

      Now, today, I don't confer or consult any more, but when I did, I had several plans from 500 to 2500 still LOW TICKET in my mind, however, these might be high ticket items for a new writer...again, defining what it means helps.

      We had a 5 figure list before the year 2001, and from there pared it down, rather than scaling it up, to get only BUYERS and keep the troublesome customers at arm's distance away...and these BUYERS, have been very loyal for over 20 years. So, it doesn't take a huge list, just good customers....

      hopefully, because we deliver a good product...

      And when one does this then it isn't very hard to get a substantial income along the way.

      Also, writing is the market, and so-many niches WITHIN it, so whatever is his specialty or love, passion or interest in doing would be a good place to start...then all he has to do is follow your previous suggestion: and find out what his customer's PAIN and/or DREAM is, and take it from there.

      GordonJ
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725335].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
      Originally Posted by Artkantos View Post

      I get what you're saying, but people have to start somewhere...I have seen many people to overthink the offer for months! The guy is a great writer, he knows how Twitter works and he wants to offer his services as a ghost writer, grow accounts etcetera, so IMO he should go for hi-ticket, you can do done-for-you and you don't need much to start, you can start organic and with one client you're in the business. I think is the best way for him to learn on the fly

      Ofc he will do whatever he wants depending on how he gets out of bed haha but we had a conversation about this yesterday and I think it was a nice debate to have!
      Somehow, I missed this post until now.

      The obvious answer is to offer samples of his work, and just charge what he would normally charge. There is no need for a starter offer.

      But he should have a page that offers a short chat over the phone, to "make sure we are on the same page". Just make sure the buyer knows what is offered , and the price, before the call.

      That call is NOT a free strategy session, or a sales pitch. It's to make sure the client understands all of what is involved, and already knows what it is going to cost.
      Signature
      One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

      "Those who know that they are profound strive for clarity. Those who would like to seem profound to the crowd strive for obscurity" Friedrich Nietzsche
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725362].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    You are confusing the issue....selling a high ticket ITEM is not the same as selling a high end SERVICE. Selling a high ticket PRODUCT depends on your ability to sell, to advertise, to convince.


    Charging a higher price as a freelancer usually depends on your skills, your experience, your testimonials and your portfolio.
    Signature
    Saving one dog will not change the world - but the world changes forever for that one dog.
    ***
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725051].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Artkantos
    Okay, okay, my bad! I don't know why I assumed hi-ticket=consulting, DFY, DWY, coaching, etcetera! Yeah, I wouldn't advise for a beginner to start by selling hi-ticket items, it's like putting the cart before the horse. Necessary clarification, good point amigos
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725058].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author blairquane
    Originally Posted by Artkantos View Post

    I was asked recently by a friend on how to start his online marketing journey. Thinking about the offer, when I started my IM journey I chose to sell low-ticket because I thought it would be easier to make a business out of it...However in the last years I focused on Hi-ticket and my numbers grew massively, what do you think of this? Was I able to make it work the hi-ticket because I grew a nice foundation before with low-ticket? If you had to start over again, how would you start hi or low?
    I think its got a lot to do with experience. It can be easier to start with a low ticket and not a lot of experience and then once you're familiar with marketing etc, you may find high ticket is doable. I'm only working into high ticket now, because I understand a lot more. I would've failed with high ticket when I started out.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725223].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author spartan14
    I think its a good idea to try going for high ticket items as its easy to 1 high ticket item compared to 100 low ticket sales
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725316].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author savidge4
    The difference between low and high is simply "Expectation" a quick video:


    Payless shoe store, there is an expectation, a ritzy store at the mall - a whole other expectation.

    Selling physical product... there is levels of expectation. Lowest to highest:

    Garage Sale
    Facebook Marketplace
    discount / outlet store
    eBay/ Amazon
    Etsy
    Retail
    Boutique Retail

    Where you sell dictates the expected "profit" or price point for the item.

    So lets take this to a "Service" and specifically a service that is sold and bought with online efforts. What is it that creates the level of separation in a market / sets the expectations?

    It breaks down into 2 and maybe 3 aspects.

    Start with the Website... you - they - anyone reading... look at top dollar sites doing or selling what you are selling... what colors are they using... what type of format are they using Left column / Right column / single column. Are they offering a synopsis, white papers, end of month reports?

    Different is failure - dont re invent the wheel here. Follow the psychology of expectation - do what success is doing.

    A quick question... I am going to open up a fast food restaurant, what colors should be branding be? There is actually 2 hard fast answers here.

    Go look at Addidas and Nike's websites... look at the header - REALLY look at the headers... its NOT about the brand... BRAND has already got you to the website. Click on a shoe on each site... the pages look very similar no? EXPECTATIONS.

    Go look at Target or Walmart look very much the same -

    Quality of content - you can have a nice looking expectation meeting site... but if the content is poor, so will your results. Websites do 1 thing and 1 thing only, and thats develop trust. Can I trust the person behind this site enough to pull out my credit card. I quiet little secret... dont tell YOUR story - tell your existing and past clients stories IE white papers or case studies or end of month member round ups. Go from ME ME ME to WE WE WE

    Lastly is your email and social outreach - GIVE GIVE GIVE as in give away the farm. You can lay out the whole plan line for line - some ( very few ) will run with it, and MOST will hire you to do it - absolutely counter intuitive - but works all day, every day.

    Start looking at the top 1% in whatever you do and emulate ( copying the psychology ) Colors and design, and then drop VALUE like its your job - NOT what you can do... what WE have done together.

    Hope that Helps!
    Signature
    Success is an ACT not an idea
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725373].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by savidge4 View Post


      Payless shoe store, there is an expectation, a ritzy store at the mall - a whole other expectation.
      I remember the campaign very well by DCX

      It didn't work, sadly. Was a great idea, but didn't save the company.

      It was invite only and the invites were big influencers...

      a little secret, some of the after testimonials were scripted.

      The website is still up though:

      https://www.palessishoes.com/
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725383].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jamell
    This will all depend on the research and the feed back that I get . I would use data as my foundation .

    So basically I would build measure and learn .
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725426].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author mickymar232
    Banned
    In spite of the fact that there are ways to stack the deck in your favor, entrepreneurs often do the opposite, making the game much harder for themselves than it has to be.

    I've seen it happen time and again while helping hundreds of people scale their business to 6 figures, 7 figures, and past 7figures.

    Entrepreneurs often make it harder on themselves to scale their business even though a few tweaks to their strategy could help them easily scale their business past 7 figures.

    Choosing the right business model is one of the most important things that can make your task of scaling much easier. In contrast, if you pick the wrong business model, your scaling efforts will turn into a long, slow grind.

    So which business model should you choose to scale your business? This is what you're going to discover in this post.See more...
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11725997].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author art72
    Originally Posted by Artkantos View Post

    I was asked recently by a friend on how to start his online marketing journey. Thinking about the offer, when I started my IM journey I chose to sell low-ticket because I thought it would be easier to make a business out of it...However in the last years I focused on Hi-ticket and my numbers grew massively, what do you think of this? Was I able to make it work the hi-ticket because I grew a nice foundation before with low-ticket? If you had to start over again, how would you start hi or low?
    I've applied a similar mindset online and off, and whilst I have yet to successfully sell high ticket items online, the consensus is; it takes nearly the same time, energy, and effort to sell a low end item as a does a high end item, so in reality; it would become a question of knowing the niche market and the demand - over that of a specific items cost or value at the time of sale.

    My daughter bought a BMW years ago, it was 7 years old and in excellent condition, nice car. But... try selling that once $65k car for more than $3,500 today would be a stretch as the resale values are not that great.

    Then, I saw a pair of Van's "Nuclear Blast" hi-tops sneakers on eBay and begin to think; that's more than I've sold after 87 sales (*as my focus was to start with $30 or less items)... which translates into needing more traffic and more sales to hit say a 6-figure return.

    Meanwhile, I believe; the key is "in-knowing' beforehand what the "service or item" is worth to the recipient, buyer, or end user?

    So I think the real question is; which audience do you choose to serve high end? or low end?

    Although, I am somewhat bias still, as I believe people do not put much thought into dropping $30 on an item as they would a $300,000 home per se. And you can make say 50% commissions on a $30 product, whereas a realtor has to usually pay the house (*broker) 3% and they earn 3% (*with the average being a 6% fee for their services.)
    Signature
    Atop a tree with Buddha ain't a bad place to take rest!
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11726712].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author max5ty
      Originally Posted by art72 View Post

      I've applied a similar mindset online and off, and whilst I have yet to successfully sell high ticket items online, the consensus is; it takes nearly the same time, energy, and effort to sell a low end item as a does a high end item, so in reality; it would become a question of knowing the niche market and the demand - over that of a specific items cost or value at the time of sale.

      My daughter bought a BMW years ago, it was 7 years old and in excellent condition, nice car. But... try selling that once $65k car for more than $3,500 today would be a stretch as the resale values are not that great.

      Then, I saw a pair of Van's "Nuclear Blast" hi-tops sneakers on eBay and begin to think; that's more than I've sold after 87 sales (*as my focus was to start with $30 or less items)... which translates into needing more traffic and more sales to hit say a 6-figure return.

      Meanwhile, I believe; the key is "in-knowing' beforehand what the "service or item" is worth to the recipient, buyer, or end user?

      So I think the real question is; which audience do you choose to serve high end? or low end?

      Although, I am somewhat bias still, as I believe people do not put much thought into dropping $30 on an item as they would a $300,000 home per se. And you can make say 50% commissions on a $30 product, whereas a realtor has to usually pay the house (*broker) 3% and they earn 3% (*with the average being a 6% fee for their services.)
      The whole high ticket - low ticket debate to me is a little confusing.

      You don't advertise high-ticket stuff to low-ticket buyers...pretty simple really.

      You don't advertise Mcdonald's combo meals in upscale restaurant magazines.

      I've been a pilot for almost 40 years...I sold my plane a couple of months ago and got another one. I didn't advertise it where low ticket buyers shop...they wouldn't be interested and they would no doubt think the price was too high.

      If you're selling high-dollar items, you advertise where high-dollar buyers are.

      If you're selling low-ticket items, you advertise where low-ticket buyers are.

      Pretty simple really. There is no "should I sell a high ticket or low ticket" debate.

      Just my thoughts on the matter
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11726715].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
        Originally Posted by max5ty View Post

        You don't advertise high-ticket stuff to low-ticket buyers...pretty simple really.

        You don't advertise Mcdonald's combo meals in upscale restaurant magazines.

        If you're selling high-dollar items, you advertise where high-dollar buyers are.

        If you're selling low-ticket items, you advertise where low-ticket buyers are.

        Pretty simple really. There is no "should I sell a high ticket or low ticket" debate.

        That's more insightful than most might think.

        In my selling, I found that the single biggest indicator of whether someone would buy or not was...what did they buy before, and how did they buy it?

        I did a three year study of who I sold to, and what they bought before, when I was selling vacuum cleaners in people's homes.

        I found that if the customer had bought a high end item or service for more money than my product's cost....and it was sold by someone coming to their home, they were almost 80% likely to buy from me, from that one factor alone. If they were also a referral from one of my buyers, that shot up to about 90%..

        If they have never bought anything from an in home salesman before (or worse, had seen an in home salesperson, and didn't buy), they were less than 15% likely to buy from me.

        For years, I was closing about 40% on cold calls. It wasn't until I studied their buying experience that I realized who was buying inside that 40%.

        Once I figured out what these Buying Factors were, I stopped spending time with unlikely buyers, and spent all my selling effort finding the people who would almost be expecting to buy from me.

        In fact, when I combined these groups of Highly Likely Buyers, and found them through referrals who had also bought from me, my closing percentage (plus the percentage that would talk to me in the first place) shot through the roof. It hovered around 90% for the last several years.

        If you sell a high end service with webinars, find a group that bought something in the same price range from a webinar before. Same with selling over the phone, by e-mail, voice mail, video, in person. Of course this has to also be a group that would conceivably buy what you sell.

        "What did they buy before?"... is the single biggest factor I've seen in determining whether they were likely to buy from you. At least, that's my experience.

        And "Do they know someone else who bought from you?" is the second biggest factor.
        Signature
        One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

        "Those who know that they are profound strive for clarity. Those who would like to seem profound to the crowd strive for obscurity" Friedrich Nietzsche
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11726729].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Artkantos
      Yes, but there are places (especially online, social media, etcetera) where there are hi-ticket buyers and low ticket buyers and if you are starting organically, all your marketing should be consistent and with your skills and knowledge you can solve a problem for a specific audience, and that audience can be hi-ticket buyers to whom you can offer consulting, dfy, premium, etcetera and low ticket buyers to whom you can offer courses, ebooks and the like...So I think the debate makes sense
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11726728].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author savidge4
        Originally Posted by Artkantos View Post

        Yes, but there are places (especially online, social media, etcetera) where there are hi-ticket buyers and low ticket buyers and if you are starting organically, all your marketing should be consistent and with your skills and knowledge you can solve a problem for a specific audience, and that audience can be hi-ticket buyers to whom you can offer consulting, dfy, premium, etcetera and low ticket buyers to whom you can offer courses, ebooks and the like...So I think the debate makes sense
        I would say this incorrect. Who you follow and who follows you is a choice...a choice based on the topic and the content of that topic. You can very easily attract High dollar followers as much as you can attract low dollar ones. It is without question a thought out choice.
        Signature
        Success is an ACT not an idea
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11726739].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Artkantos
          Interesting point...It's true that a wide market like "marketing" can include hi and low ticket clients...But your content strategy should be focus on attracting your desired audience from the beginning, therefore no need to filter or decide after, that's what you mean?
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11726882].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author savidge4
            Originally Posted by Artkantos View Post

            Interesting point...It's true that a wide market like "marketing" can include hi and low ticket clients...But your content strategy should be focus on attracting your desired audience from the beginning, therefore no need to filter or decide after, that's what you mean?
            Yes - exactly... who looks at your content right down the demographic of income is a choice. The same applies with who you hang out with in real life.
            Signature
            Success is an ACT not an idea
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11726887].message }}
  • I personally use a combo of high/low tickets depending on the audience.

    If you can get their demographics and psychographics, apply good copy and you're golden.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11726941].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics