Proliferating privacy laws, changes in data gathering worry marketers: IAB report

by WarriorForum.com Administrator
7 replies
An author on Martech.org says that consumers don't see value of sharing data and marketers want a "one size fits all" privacy law, the IAB finds.



The writer claims marketing faces headwinds from fragmented privacy legislation and the inconsistent phase-out of third-party cookies, according to an IAB report about privacy and addressability for the digital ad industry released today.

"While Google's decision to postpone the depreciation of third-party cookies until 2024 may feel like a reprieve, the industry is far from off the hook," said IAB CEO David Cohen in a statement. "The industry is already operating with significantly less signal given the changes by Apple, Firefox and others."

The report, IAB State of Data 2022 (Part II), features findings that came out of interviews with senior-level marketers at brands, agencies and publishers. Among the issues raised:
  • Complying with the different privacy requirements of different state laws is making data collection and use increasingly unwieldy. Businesses want single law covering the entire nation, but that's been rejected by Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA).
  • First-party datasets from logged-in "known" audiences only represent about 20% of consumers, leaving the remaining 80% less reachable and addressable.
  • Consumers are still largely confused about why they should disclose their data, even as they expect relevant ads which depend on the use of that data.
  • Privacy legislation is likely to increase the advantages of big publishers over small ones. Very few respondents at publishers said they had the budget to pursue data enrichment and collection tools needed to compete with larger firms.

The author also says that consumers' reticence to disclose data is usually framed as a failure of communication by marketers. Do you agree with that statement?

And surely the complicated, ever-changing legal landscape across multiple states doesn't help?

Nor can the fact that most companies aren't yet in compliance with those laws, right?
#data #gathering #iab #laws #marketers #privacy #proliferating #report #worry
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  • Profile picture of the author skgeorge
    The author also says that consumers' reticence to disclose data is usually framed as a failure of communication by marketers. Do you agree with that statement?
    Yes, I agree with his opinion. Why should a customer disclose her data if the marketer has nothing to offer?

    A marketer must convince the customer that it is the customer's benefit to disclose the data. Marketers must come out with smart ideas.
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  • Profile picture of the author Odahh
    Increasing censorship and fear of the invasive levels of data collection. Terrified people. Or at least crossed into creepy territory.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    The bullet points seem to be about the 'poor marketers and how tough they have it'....but the truth is that pushback from some quarters on data collections practices is going to increase and in time become legislation.

    Marketers have only themselves to blame - big tech has been more invasive - sharing and selling 'data' collected from consumers - trying for more and more personal information in order to advertise and control what people view.

    It is not up to consumers or to a federal govt to make 'data accumulation' easier for big tech and social media. What tech refers to as 'data collection' is the accumulation of the PERSONAL details of individuals. The more they know about you - the better they can target you. We know that - and yet we still hand over our personal information.

    I have never heard anyone I know say they 'love the targeted ads' - that idea was from marketers...and for marketers...in big tech and social media. Google and social media platforms know they may be 'brought to heel' at some point - and that's likely why they are delaying changes in third party ads. Making hay while they can....
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    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      I don't mean it; just want you to not be able to say it: I love targeted ads.

      Now, to the serious problem:
      If their targeted data would, at least, work. As in, give me ads for things I'm looking to buy. But no, they do not. Instead, they give me lots of those the day after I buy.

      For instance: recently, I bought bookcases online. Had not seen one stoopid ad for them till 5 minutes after I made my purchase.


      ONCE I BUY MY BOOKSHELVES, I DO NOT NEED BOOKSHELVES.


      For the next 3 weeks, I got loads of ads for bookcases.


      And if, at least, they served me ads once or twice, not every time I open a browser!


      So, yeah, you're right: marketers have done it to themselves.


      And, worse, some of them were not careful as to keeping the data private, either.


      I figure, the good marketers will not be too troubled, the rest would. Though it does make things harder for all.


      It's kind of like phone numbers right now: kids are shocked that I once used to know dozens of phone numbers by heart and had a phone book with all the numbers I needed. Kids back then did not get bothered...


      I mean, expectations are part of the problem. Once people get used to the new laws being in place, they'll do the same: the new marketers will just take it as 'this is how it is,' the older ones will complain and adjust or just complain. The ones best at marketing will do well, the rest not so well (but I have the feeling they were not doing that great before any of the restrictions).



      Originally Posted by Kay King View Post

      The bullet points seem to be about the 'poor marketers and how tough they have it'....but the truth is that pushback from some quarters on data collections practices is going to increase and in time become legislation.

      Marketers have only themselves to blame - big tech has been more invasive - sharing and selling 'data' collected from consumers - trying for more and more personal information in order to advertise and control what people view.

      It is not up to consumers or to a federal govt to make 'data accumulation' easier for big tech and social media. What tech refers to as 'data collection' is the accumulation of the PERSONAL details of individuals. The more they know about you - the better they can target you. We know that - and yet we still hand over our personal information.

      I have never heard anyone I know say they 'love the targeted ads' - that idea was from marketers...and for marketers...in big tech and social media. Google and social media platforms know they may be 'brought to heel' at some point - and that's likely why they are delaying changes in third party ads. Making hay while they can....
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  • Profile picture of the author sihabuddin2
    They may complain about winter holiday marketing done before Halloween, but many start shopping long before that.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nigam Mohanty
    good content
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  • Profile picture of the author Odahh
    I don't think we can blame marketers as a whole. I'll put a lot of it on mark Zuckerberg. If there is a face to put to why privacy laws are needed. It's his.
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