5 great value propositions and why they work

by WF- Enzo Administrator
13 replies
"Free Shipping on All Orders" - This value proposition works because it offers a tangible benefit to the customer: the convenience and cost savings of not having to pay for shipping.

"100% Money-Back Guarantee" - This value proposition works because it removes the risk for the customer. If they are not satisfied with their purchase, they can get their money back, which can be a powerful motivator for people who are on the fence about making a purchase.

"Largest Selection in the Industry" - This value proposition works because it speaks to the customer's desire for choice and variety. By offering a wide selection of products, the company is positioning itself as the go-to destination for those who want a lot of options.

"Expert Customer Support" - This value proposition works because it addresses a common pain point for customers: the fear of not being able to get help when they need it. By promising expert customer support, the company is demonstrating its commitment to customer satisfaction and giving customers confidence that they will be able to get the help they need if something goes wrong.

"Lowest Prices Guaranteed" - This value proposition works because it speaks to the customer's desire to get the best deal possible. By promising the lowest prices, the company is positioning itself as a cost-effective option and giving customers confidence that they are getting the best value for their money.

Chime in.
#great #propositions #work
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author Jamell
    What's the percentage of people that get their money back from a "get your money back guaranteed advert? "

    Expert customer support is the 1 that stands out the most to me .
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11738368].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
      Originally Posted by Jamell View Post

      What's the percentage of people that get their money back from a "get your money back guaranteed advert? "
      From the advert? Probably zero.

      I think you'd have to buy the product first.
      Signature


      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11738376].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
    Thanks, right out of the copywriter/sales manual.

    All of these value propositions and others are meant to aid in making a sale. They are used to persuade, cajole, get them off the fence to make a decision, and they are all good ideas...

    IF NEEDED...

    My fav is: here it is, buy it or don't.

    In the big scheme of business, it is so much easier to offer what is wanted, and bought than to try to sell the offer via persuasion, influence, copywriting...

    On the shelf of the Circle K sits little Debbie, smiling for sure, but not once has she ever used one of these value propositions to get me to buy. Lil Deb sez, here is the Nutty Buddy, buy it or don't.

    I love her business model.

    GordonJ

    Originally Posted by WF- Enzo View Post

    "Free Shipping on All Orders" - This value proposition works because it offers a tangible benefit to the customer: the convenience and cost savings of not having to pay for shipping.

    "100% Money-Back Guarantee" - This value proposition works because it removes the risk for the customer. If they are not satisfied with their purchase, they can get their money back, which can be a powerful motivator for people who are on the fence about making a purchase.

    "Largest Selection in the Industry" - This value proposition works because it speaks to the customer's desire for choice and variety. By offering a wide selection of products, the company is positioning itself as the go-to destination for those who want a lot of options.

    "Expert Customer Support" - This value proposition works because it addresses a common pain point for customers: the fear of not being able to get help when they need it. By promising expert customer support, the company is demonstrating its commitment to customer satisfaction and giving customers confidence that they will be able to get the help they need if something goes wrong.

    "Lowest Prices Guaranteed" - This value proposition works because it speaks to the customer's desire to get the best deal possible. By promising the lowest prices, the company is positioning itself as a cost-effective option and giving customers confidence that they are getting the best value for their money.

    Chime in.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11738374].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
    Originally Posted by WF- Enzo View Post


    "100% Money-Back Guarantee" -

    "Largest Selection in the Industry" - This value proposition works because it speaks to the customer's desire for choice and variety. By offering a wide selection of products, the company is positioning itself as the go-to destination for those who want a lot of options.


    "Expert Customer Support" -

    "Lowest Prices Guaranteed" - This value proposition works because it speaks to the customer's desire to get the best deal possible.

    Chime in.
    Interesting now let's talk about a real-life company. A very popular company selling stereos and home electronics. They ran huge ads promoting all those value propositions. Long story short they went from being one of the biggest chains in the area to going broke. The large chain went out of business, the owner fled the country. Was dragged back to the US and is serving time in prison the last I heard.

    Being the lowers is not always the best method, a lot of times it is a race to the bottom. Only to wind up out of business. At one time K-Mart, Sears, and several others had all those value propositions sadly they have either shut down or hanging on by a thread.

    Speaking of Largest Selection, how many small businesses are trying to provide that in the clothing industry? Are currently struggling to have enough cash on hand to keep the doors open. Sometimes limited numbers of quality products will outsell large quantities of junk.

    While the value propositions mentioned above are good, they may not be the best solution for someone trying to sell products or services. Just pointing a few pitfalls that are possible.
    Signature


    Earn10% average annual returnshttps://app.groundfloor.us/r/m2aa7b
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11738384].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    Originally Posted by WF- Enzo View Post

    "Expert Customer Support" - This value proposition works because it addresses a common pain point for customers: the fear of not being able to get help when they need it. By promising expert customer support, the company is demonstrating its commitment to customer satisfaction and giving customers confidence that they will be able to get the help they need if something goes wrong.

    "Lowest Prices Guaranteed" - This value proposition works because it speaks to the customer's desire to get the best deal possible. By promising the lowest prices, the company is positioning itself as a cost-effective option and giving customers confidence that they are getting the best value for their money.

    Chime in.
    Depending on what you are selling, and to whom.....these are appeals to to different categories of customers.

    My experience is that expert customer service, a knowledgeable staff, and real advice given before and after the sale appeals to the higher end buyer.

    Advertising the lowest prices tends to attract the people with the least amount of money, and they tend to buy the cheapest option.

    Years ago, a friend of mine had a mattress and bedding store. All his ads showed his least expensive and lowest priced options. And he advertised that he had the lowest prices.

    The truth is, he also had great prices on far more expensive options. But he complained that the only people that came in the store were buying the cheapest options...with the lowest margins.

    I told him that he was repelling the 80% of the market that wasn't primarily price shopping by only showing the cheapest, lowest quality stuff. And he was only attracting the lowest end buyers.

    Expert advice, service after the sale, and the best quality are what attract the people that buy the best stuff that is the most profitable to sell.

    At least that's my experience.
    Signature
    One Call Closing book https://www.amazon.com/One-Call-Clos...=1527788418&sr

    What if they're not stars? What if they are holes poked in the top of a container so we can breath?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11738399].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author blooo
    i recommand the book : The Principles Of Marketing by kotler
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11738440].message }}
  • Creating legitimate scarcity also converts possible prospects into actual buyers.

    * For a limited time only, you get these amazing bonuses worth $5k for free, when click on the buy now button immediately.

    * One time offer

    * This offer expires in 24 hours

    * Only 3 slots left

    As mentioned in other posts above, by offering
    "Free shipping on all orders", "100% "Money-Back Guarantee", "Expert customer support ", "Lowest Prices Guaranteed", you are just using best practices of high converting sales copy. Weave these elements of copywriting into the "hero's/moron's journey" type of story on your website's product page, and you'll have a high converting sales page.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11738755].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author andres cardenas
    "Free Shipping on All Orders" - This value proposition works because it offers a tangible benefit to the customer: the convenience and cost savings of not having to pay for shipping.

    This is always something that wins me over when purchasing a product specifically from brands or products I really want. I will often try to avoid paying shipping due to how much it can add cost to what your purchasing. You have to play the mathematical game to figure out if the free shipping is worth it or if paying shipping is still cheaper but for the most part I have found that free shipping ends up being cheaper.

    For example I was looking at ETE kettlebell sale they had and was excited to get the deal but the moment I hit the shipping portion the cost shot up almost to the same price as the kettlebells.

    I then went over to Bells of Steel and like usual they offer free shipping (in the US at least) and even though the ETE kettlebells without shipping were "cheaper" the ones at Bells of Steel ended up being a better cost because of this.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11738771].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Philip David
    'Free shipping on all orders' probably converts me the most!

    Many of those value propositions are measurable to some extent, but 'Expert Customer Support' are just weasel words. It's not really measurable in the same way.

    'Expert' compared to who? Customer support is incredibly important, but unless it's followed by 'Customer Support Winners for X industry 2022' it wouldn't persuade me as much as any of the other VPs.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11739530].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author KillerVirus
    It's interesting how the word "free" works.

    As Claude said appearing "cheap" can lead to low end buyers but "free" appeals to everyone.

    For many years I ran a mail order business. I did a lot of testing in the print publications that ran my ads.

    Some results: offer two rings for $19.95 or one ring for $19.95 with a BOGO offer. BOGO out pulled every time.

    An item for $10 + $4.95 s/h or the same item for $14.95 with free s/h. Free out pulled every time.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11739548].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author DABK
      That's because free does not equal cheap.


      Because it makes people think they win something.


      Free shipping, in particular, works because the price you see when you decide you want it is the price you pay.



      Minds are interesting things.


      If I see something for $17.95 and decide that's a good price, then go to the checkout place and now there's shipping and my thing costs $23.47, you're trying to make me go up from the initial point where I thought 17.95 was worth the same or more than the item.


      If I saw your offer at $23.47, free shipping, I know the shipping is baked into the price (even if I never saw your offer where it was not) but now I do not have to do anything but click the buy now button.


      Free shipping works because it does not add another step in the buying process. The more steps you can remove, the more you sell.


      Free shipping is not like free item. Free items need to be sold just like something that costs money. Free shipping does not... it is a gift (to yourself though buyers either think it's a gift to themselves), it merely removes a hurdle.


      There are many other things that work that way. Pricing is one of them.



      Once upon a time, I was looking to buy something. I found it on two sites. On one site, the price was $605, and I recoiled in horror, That much?



      On another site, the price was $599.



      Everything else was equal except, in my case, I did not know the seller at $599. I did, anyway, buy from them.


      A few minutes after I made my purchased, I realized that the actual difference in price was $6 and, therefore, the $605 was not extravagantly high. It just cross my imaginary boundary: $600, for that particular item at that particular time.


      I had no idea why I had that boundary. But it was. Had I seen $589 and $599, I would have thought them to be in the same ball park, would have bought from the site I was familiar with even if they had the $599 price.




      Originally Posted by KillerVirus View Post

      It's interesting how the word "free" works.

      As Claude said appearing "cheap" can lead to low end buyers but "free" appeals to everyone.

      For many years I ran a mail order business. I did a lot of testing in the print publications that ran my ads.

      Some results: offer two rings for $19.95 or one ring for $19.95 with a BOGO offer. BOGO out pulled every time.

      An item for $10 + $4.95 s/h or the same item for $14.95 with free s/h. Free out pulled every time.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11739644].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author KillerVirus
    Have you ever noticed how many successful marketers are also fairly good phycologists?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11739650].message }}
  • "Free Shipping" can bite you in the ass if you're not careful and VERY CLEAR with how you implement it.

    That's how my husband managed to buy a really cheap TV. They offered free shipping nationwide without really understanding how expensive nationwide shipping can be.

    And that's how my husband got a nationwide mall chain in the Philippines to revise their shipping policy in less than a week.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[11742568].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics