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I'm looking at an affiliate program where they tell you to buy their program first before they'll help you sell it as an affiliate. That's kinda a red flag for me as after 27 years as an affiliate marketer I've never paid anyone so I can be in their affiliate program. Okay so they say sure Joe you can sell our program (gee thanks) here's our JV page for links.

But while they advertise a high ticket $1500 offer that pays 50% commission the only link they provide is to their $9 tripwire offer for a 3 day challenge!

I sent them emails asking for the link to their actual high ticket offer and they responded here' buy our $9 3 day challenge and we'll help you after that.

Does that feel kinda scammy to you? Because it does to me.
Which is a shame because what they're selling seems like a legit value for people!

What should I do?
#legit
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    I sent them emails asking for the link to their actual high ticket offer and they responded here' buy our $9 3 day challenge and we'll help you after that.

    Actually - no, that part doesn't sound scammy to me. If I wanted to sell a product I'd have no problem paying $9 to take a look at how it's promoted and what the lead ins are.


    Recently we had a thread where a new affiliate marketer was claiming ' they should be happy to have all the affiliates they can get' - but that's not true. High ticket sellers want affiliates who can SELL and will sometimes vet them.


    If I were thinking of promoting this I'd want to know if there is a way to justify the price. Is it possible to sell this product at $1500 or is it worth $750 which is the actual sales price less commission?


    Why aren't you willing to pay $9 for an inside look at the promotional process being used by the seller?
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Singletary
    Originally Posted by josephs View Post

    Does that feel kinda scammy to you? Because it does to me.
    Which is a shame because what they're selling seems like a legit value for people!
    The key word here is "seems." You have zero clue as to whether the product is valuable or not if you yourself are unwilling to even take the smallest bite at $9. Based on your unwillingness, I'd question any affiliate pushing me crap they wouldn't pay for themselves. But that's just me.

    What should I do?
    Do it their way or move on. It's not like they've created something revolutionary like turning water into gas or something. And I say that not even knowing what the product is.

    Good luck in figuring it out!
    Mark
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  • Profile picture of the author josephs
    Those are good points thanks.
    It was really the principle of the thing to me.
    It felt like if you can't sell your program without pushing affiliates to buy it first maybe its not such a good program.
    But its definitely a good idea for me to see the sales process their creating to see if I want to promote it myself I agree with that.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    It felt like if you can't sell your program without pushing affiliates to buy it first maybe its not such a good program.

    From another viewpoint.....how can you SELL an affiliate product...especially a high priced one...without a thorough understanding of the product and of the person(s) offering it?
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    Originally Posted by josephs View Post

    What should I do?
    The first thing I'd do is make sure that either the $9 tripwire offer wasn't featured on the sales page for the main program, or if so, there was a clear system for crediting you for any subsequent main sale conversion from a prospect you sent - within a reasonable time limit. Otherwise, if your prospects buy the $9 offer, you're just handing over their contact details to the vendor.

    The other thing I'd consider is using the $9 offer to create my own report - assuming it was related to the main offer - and use that as an incentive to get prospects signed up to my list. That would be more attractive than the "bonus stack" of PLR products you're asking about in your other thread:

    https://www.warriorforum.com/main-in...nus-stack.html
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    • Profile picture of the author josephs
      Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

      The first thing I'd do is make sure that either the $9 tripwire offer wasn't featured on the sales page for the main program, or if so, there was a clear system for crediting you with any subsequent main sale conversion from a prospect you sent - within a reasonable time limit. Otherwise, if your prospects buy the $9 offer, you're just handing over their contact details to the vendor.

      The other thing I'd consider is using the $9 offer to create my own report - assuming it was related to the main offer - and use that as an incentive to get prospects signed up to my list. That would be more attractive than the "bonus stack" of PLR products you're asking about in your other thread:

      https://www.warriorforum.com/main-in...nus-stack.html

      Thanks, Interesting idea!
      Can you recommend any ways I can create a bonus stack to offer?
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      • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
        Originally Posted by josephs View Post

        Thanks, Interesting idea!
        Can you recommend any ways I can create a bonus stack to offer?
        I wouldn't be thinking in terms of bonus stacks. Unless you already have access to a targeted prospect base, you'll need to build a degree of trust or demonstrate some niche authority to potential buyers if you're going to push for a $1500 purchase.

        That's why the $9 offer could be an opportunity for you to get to grips with the 3-day challenge (whatever that is) and use that experience to help create a report (or video) that answers the questions a prospect might have before committing to the main program.
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        • Profile picture of the author josephs
          I hear you. Thanks.
          On watching his process and video in the 3 day challenge tripwire offer I can see him setting people up for the high ticket offer.
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  • Profile picture of the author Monetize
    Originally Posted by josephs View Post

    I'm looking at an affiliate program where they tell you to buy their program first before they'll help you sell it as an affiliate. That's kinda a red flag for me as after 27 years as an affiliate marketer I've never paid anyone so I can be in their affiliate program. Okay so they say sure Joe you can sell our program (gee thanks) here's our JV page for links.

    But while they advertise a high ticket $1500 offer that pays 50% commission the only link they provide is to their $9 tripwire offer for a 3 day challenge!

    I sent them emails asking for the link to their actual high ticket offer and they responded here' buy our $9 3 day challenge and we'll help you after that.

    Does that feel kinda scammy to you? Because it does to me.
    Which is a shame because what they're selling seems like a legit value for people!

    What should I do?


    I agree with what Kay King says.

    When I first started reading your post, I thought you would
    say that they wanted you to buy their $1,500 product first.

    $9 is not unreasonable, but if you think it's cheesy and do
    not feel comfortable with this company then find something
    else to promote.

    There are hundreds of reputable affiliate offers and there's
    no shortage of high ticket offers, and ones with recurring,
    residuals, and all types of profitable payment models.

    Look for offers besides JV's like financial services, travel,
    luxury goods, etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author talfighel
    They want you to own that product so that you can see what you are selling to others.

    Nothing scammy about that.
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  • Profile picture of the author aduttonater
    It's all part of a business model. Some are free, some are low cost investing and others are high investment. Depending on the value offered is what you should pay. If you think it's going to bring a good return dollar wise or education wise go for it. Another way to look at investing into say a back office is that you are paying to keep a business open and up and running. The lights paid, all utilities, land, etc. Now just make some sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author OnlineAddict
    Of course its scammy. If they really wanted, they would send you the offer for free and not ask for $9, thats pathetic.


    Can't believe there are so many naive people here.
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    • Profile picture of the author TobiMDD
      Originally Posted by OnlineAddict View Post

      Of course its scammy. If they really wanted, they would send you the offer for free and not ask for $9, thats pathetic.


      Can't believe there are so many naive people here.

      Maybe they want him to understand the process first and all the products before he takes a look at the high ticket offer?


      I agree with others above, nothing unusual to drive people into a low ticket offer first before anything else.
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    • Profile picture of the author GordonJ
      Originally Posted by OnlineAddict View Post

      Of course its scammy. If they really wanted, they would send you the offer for free and not ask for $9, thats pathetic.
      Can't believe there are so many naive people here.
      We welcome the naive, and in light of your sig file, you should love this place.

      The WF is the Internet version of Ellis Island: Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!

      Although slightly modified for IM:
      Send your desperate, your naive, we welcome the wretched, those tempest tossed lost souls seeking a beacon in the dark night of Internet Marketing. We offer the golden door to fame, fortune and family, and if one door closes, we help you open another one.

      Where else online can the naive go...and find generous folks like yourself ready to show them the light, EH?

      GordonJ
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      • Profile picture of the author Monetize
        Originally Posted by GordonJ View Post

        Although slightly modified for IM:
        Send your desperate, your naive, we welcome the wretched, those tempest tossed lost souls seeking a beacon in the dark night of Internet Marketing. We offer the golden door to fame, fortune and family, and if one door closes, we help you open another one.

        This is GREAT but you forgot about the lazy.

        The ones who want to get rich without putting in any effort.

        Being called naive isn't really an insult

        https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/naive

        Definition 3 definitely applies to me since I learned most
        everything I know about IM on my own, especially when
        I was just starting back in 1999, I had a book about mail
        order and I used those fundamental methods to start my
        internet/eBay sales business.

        I also had The Catalog of Catalogs that has the contact
        information of various companies I needed, and other
        reference books that came in handy and that I continue
        to use to this day.

        Thankfully some naive people are also bookworms.

        As to the $9, what Kay said, unless you are established
        and referred by someone in the industry, people are not
        going to send you samples because you are perceived
        as a freebie seeking freeloader, and companies are not
        going to waste their time with you.

        There's a gazillion dollars worth of information on this
        forum yet they routinely come here to ask how to get
        started, and we respond to them even when we know
        they're never going to do anything besides sit on their
        heinies and complain.

        They won't even try anything, they would rather come
        here and ask if somebody else tried it already and
        what other people think about it.

        I realized it had gone downhill when a newbie asked
        for instructions on making a clickable hyperlink.

        Anyway, I wish everybody a wonderful Holiday week,
        and that you all are richly blessed this Thanksgiving!
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        • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
          Originally Posted by Monetize View Post

          As to the $9, what Kay said, unless you are established
          and referred by someone in the industry, people are not
          going to send you samples because you are perceived
          as a freebie seeking freeloader, and companies are not
          going to waste their time with you.
          One problem marketers have with affiliate enquirers is that the "affiliate" just wants to pay half, instead of the whole price.

          Another problem is the "affiliate" making promises that can't be kept by the supplier. And these promises are almost exclusively made by the very beginner affiliates, who immediately go to under cutting prices, promising rebates, or adding bonuses in addition to the main offer.

          But you are right. Nearly all the money is made, in each niche, by a relatively small group of marketers who are each other's affiliates.

          And the "affiliate" who cares about spending $9, isn't going to be a huge catch.

          It reminds me of publishers. They are spending their time going after authors they know have a large following, and will sell a ton of books. And they are being pursued by new authors with nothing to offer but a good book that isn't in demand.
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  • Profile picture of the author Claude Whitacre
    It's only $9.

    Heck, I'd be happy to give them $9 just to see their funnel and upsells.
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  • Profile picture of the author writeaway
    As long as the 'product' is a one-time purchase, the offer you got is probably not a scam

    BUT...

    If you have to sign up for a recurring membership just to have the 'right' to sell other memberships and get a % of your downline, such schemes can be legally sketchy.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kay King
    It was a one time - and most likely a qualifier used by the seller. Someone who isn't able or willing to pay $9 to see HOW to sell a product is not going to sell $1500 products.



    A reality is that affiliates with a good sales track records are contacted BY SELLERS who want them to 'represent' their product. New affiliates who have never sold anything online are not what most sellers are looking for - especially not for higher priced products.
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  • Profile picture of the author josephs
    Lots of great answers here I appreciate every one of them!
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  • Profile picture of the author josephs
    What I personally dislike are theses programs that are saying in order to promote them you have to buy their product. I've actually been making money every month as an affiliate marketer since 1996.

    I started with pay per click programs as that's what existed almost entirely at the time. Then moved on to pay per sale and revshare programs in verticals like dating, weight loss, and online gaming.

    During that time I've referred some seven figure earning affiliates to programs and earned commissions for doing so in the high six figures.

    And in that time I've never paid any affiliate program for the privilege of sending them traffic.

    This idea of requiring affiliates to buy your software or products each month to qualify to be an affiliate is reminiscent of Amway's multi-level marketing model where the company made huge profits off of people having to preload inventory they kept in their apartments and were strongly encouraged to sell their friends and families the products to make money. The vast majority of these MLM affiliates never got in the black. While of course the first in MLM folks a few at the top did really well.

    To me, if your membership site, or software, or whatever it is you sell is strong enough to sell ie a good value it will stand on its own without the company using affiliates as a customer base to sell to.

    Ok so the response I expect which is a fair one is likely going to be "If you don't like it then don't pay them to be an affiliate". I agree. Like I said, that's a fair response to my post here.

    If the product program whatever is a good enough value I'll buy it!
    But, I resent being told that if I don't buy it I can't be an affiliate. I think that's a bad business model.

    As to the $9 tripwire sale to gain access to the affiliate link, it was just a way of getting my and other people';s card data on file to make it easier to upsell to the high ticket offer which was the thing I wanted to promote as an affiliate,. And the 3 day webinar didn't reveal anything about the high ticket offer that wasn't freely available on their YouTube channel.

    It might be a great tactic to get leads and people's cards on file for future one click upsells and likely makes them a ton of money.

    But it didn't really give me the information about the high ticket program I wanted to promote at all.

    Thanks for all of your interesting and thoughtful replies.

    Have a great Holiday Season!
    Joe
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    • Profile picture of the author Monetize
      Originally Posted by josephs View Post

      What I personally dislike are theses programs that are saying in order to promote them you have to buy their product. I've actually been making money every month as an affiliate marketer since 1996.

      I have engaged in affiliate sales since back in the day as
      well, not as long as you though.

      Things have changed and I noticed that some companies
      want people to sign up for their actual products or services
      before being approved to promote them.

      This is probably due to the proliferation of people wanting to
      get into the business, and most of them never taking action
      or making sales.

      Another requirement lately is that they want influencers and
      people with large established social media followings.

      You can't just tell them that you have 100K followers on X
      or wherever, they have portals for you to log into your social
      media account to prove that is your account.

      I contacted an affiliate network once where they told me I
      had to spend $5K a day on ads.

      Affiliate marketing is serious business, it's not tiddlywinks
      anymore.

      Anyway I am glad you returned to your thread and
      Happy Holidays to you as well.
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      • Profile picture of the author josephs
        Hello, thanks for your reply and kind words.
        I hope you have a healthy happy Holiday season as well!

        Joe
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  • Profile picture of the author Devilfish168
    some is legit , yea as other claim they want you own the product know yourself thus indirectly you can promote their product since you find it good.
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