Should you include FAQs on product or category pages?

by WarriorForum.com Administrator
15 replies
Do FAQs make sense in the first place?

Chime in.
#category #faqs #include #pages #product
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  • Profile picture of the author CintaQs
    Incentive on STILL as in the past in was, but o thought FAQs were deleted from the search.

    At least it is important and helpful for the visitors having questions.
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  • No FAQ should evah introdooce noo stuff naht seen in the main areah.

    Yet it must appeah as if it does, without soundin' too evidently like no kinda ECHO.

    If SHOW beats TELL, TELL must always beat ASK.

    This clear?
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  • Profile picture of the author vikeshsdp
    Originally Posted by WarriorForum.com View Post

    Do FAQs make sense in the first place?

    Chime in.
    Yes, FAQs are a useful way to provide quick answers to common questions and reduce the workload of customer support teams.
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  • @WarriorForum.com,

    Originally Posted by WarriorForum.com View Post

    [SNIP]
    Do FAQs make sense in the first place?
    [/SNIP]
    For my use cases, yes.
    I get good value by providing my ideal viewers with helpful FAQs content about any of my products and niche topics, pre or post sales?
    ** FAQs content reduces my support ticket volume.
    ** And I'm able to use FAQs content to get more organic search traffic.

    Originally Posted by WarriorForum.com View Post

    [SNIP]
    Should you include FAQs on product or category pages?
    [/SNIP]
    I put specific FAQs in each product page.
    These specific FAQs are about the product on focus.

    And more general FAQs for each category in each category page.
    These are about the category on focus.

    That way, I'm able to quickly address the pre and post sales questions of both my prospects and current paying customers.
    These range from questions about broader topics (FAQs in category pages), to more specific ones (FAQs in product pages).

    Plus, there's an opportunity to SE-optimize each of my pages.
    So I put FAQs schema markup. I target relevant questions with good search demand across my ideal markets in my target geos. And I implement my on-page SE-optimization techniques.
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    • Profile picture of the author Monetize
      Originally Posted by Marx Vergel Melencio View Post

      @WarriorForum.com,



      For my use cases, yes.
      I get good value by providing my ideal viewers with helpful FAQs content about any of my products and niche topics, pre or post sales?
      ** FAQs content reduces my support ticket volume.
      ** And I'm able to use FAQs content to get more organic search traffic.



      I put specific FAQs in each product page.
      These specific FAQs are about the product on focus.

      And more general FAQs for each category in each category page.
      These are about the category on focus.

      That way, I'm able to quickly address the pre and post sales questions of both my prospects and current paying customers.
      These range from questions about broader topics (FAQs in category pages), to more specific ones (FAQs in product pages).

      Plus, there's an opportunity to SE-optimize each of my pages.
      So I put FAQs schema markup. I target relevant questions with good search demand across my ideal markets in my target geos. And I implement my on-page SE-optimization techniques.

      I agree with you on this and do as much with FAQs as possible.

      FAQs are a great way to insert more relevant keywords to product pages as well as websites.

      They give visitors additional information about the product/service and other details, like payment processing, shipping times, etc.

      If anything on the page or website can be questioned, I think that developing helpful FAQs is a great practice.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mark Singletary
    I wish more companies/websites had better, more valuable, relevant FAQs. If I'm left wondering about this or that, my nature is just to leave.

    Mark
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  • Thing to considah also is how THE MORE yr FAQs kinda ANSA, the less likely nowan consultin' yr ass direct for the finah detail (which is the whole pointa stuffs anyways).

    So you gotta thinka them FAQs as amplifyerckations of valyoo you pumpin' out elsewhere, kinda like mini ads for your brilliance.
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    It's all about context (isn't everything?).

    I'm not keen on sites that use FAQs as a substitute for support and make you wade through pages of irrelevance just to get to an actual contact number or address.

    FAQs can be useful for more technical services but other than that, too many of them might indicate your sales pages aren't really doing their job.
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    • Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

      It's all about context (isn't everything?).

      I'm not keen on sites that use FAQs as a substitute for support and make you wade through pages of irrelevance just to get to an actual contact number or address.

      FAQs can be useful for more technical services but other than that, too many of them might indicate your sales pages aren't really doing their job.
      Yeah, thinka FREQUENTLY ANSAD Qs, an' that is what you wanna ensure evrywan sees up front.

      Don't leave 'em guessin'.
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      Lightin' fuses is for blowin' stuff togethah.

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  • Profile picture of the author Awais_Afzal1
    I am from health niche and as per google they only accepts FAQs from top authority websites.
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  • Profile picture of the author deltahost
    are there questions about the product that are often asked, this indicates that the description of this product is incomplete, and if you do not have a complete description of the product, then just in case for consultation, make a phone number easily accessible, you need to understand that the products are there and this is a very large list of that what people can buy from you, you do not provide for all the possible questions that may be asked to you, so making an easily accessible telephone number for consultation is one of the quick methods of solving this
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  • Profile picture of the author spartan14
    Well i think its important to add as your product look more profesional plus it gives a sense of trust as people can know the important stuff about your product
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  • Profile picture of the author psychicrajsharma
    Yes, including FAQs on product or category pages is a good practice. FAQs can help address common customer questions, provide additional information, and improve the overall user experience. They can also reduce customer support inquiries, build trust, and potentially boost SEO by incorporating relevant keywords and phrases.
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  • Profile picture of the author Moneymiseh
    I work for corporate retail and we have FAQ schema for all of our product landing pages for all product categories but not on the product page itself and I would say yes if done right it is very effective. In fact we had a developer copy content and strip the scripts on accident and our traffic dropped. It really depends on the brand and company and purpose of the site. We always put faqs toward the bottom of the page before the footer.

    https://developers.google.com/search...d-data/faqpage
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  • Profile picture of the author dynamicard
    Banned
    Yes, including FAQs on product or category pages is highly beneficial. They address common customer queries, reduce bounce rates, and improve the overall user experience. FAQs can boost SEO by incorporating relevant keywords and providing valuable content. They also build customer trust and confidence, leading to higher conversion rates and reduced customer service inquiries.
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  • Profile picture of the author IM Simple
    Yes, FAQs are helpful. I'd suggest to just place a FAQs section on blog pages instead. Instead of placing it on product/category pages, you can encourage users to contact you directly for questions. However, most users don't like to interact if they are still not sure what they're looking for or what type of service they want to see, so better to improve your copywriting to include all important details already.
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