Political Tweets--Bad For Business?

by Alan Petersen 30 replies
Seems like every other tweet now days is about politics. I followed these folks for their business, marketing, etc. not their political dogma.

Some are down right nasty. I'm unfollowing some since I get enough news about the upcoming US election coming at me from everywhere...last place I need/want it is from is Twitter.

If you're using Twitter for business I would think spewing your political beliefs in your tweets would be bad for business if you get folks unfollowing. What's the old saying? Don't discuss politics and religion among friends. You won't be converting anyone to your side in 140 characters or less.

One thing is a tweet about an interesting article or blog post about candidate so-and-so here but a tweet saying candidate so-and-so is a [censored] [censored]...just makes those folks tweeting it look unprofessional IMHO.

One thing is for sure...I can't wait until this election is OVER!
#main internet marketing discussion forum #business #political #tweetsbad
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
    Alan,
    I followed these folks for their business, marketing, etc. not their political dogma.
    I tend not to get into my political views in places I consider as business forums. That is a (very) personal choice.

    If the people doing this promoted their presence on Twitter as business-related, I can see your point. If they didn't, you're working with an unfounded expectation.

    Tuning out (un-following, in this case) is a perfectly rational response to a communication channel you don't get anything from. Trying to get other people to change their behavior based on your unfounded expectations might not be nearly as effective.

    As for the language, I tend to agree. The political environment in this country has become so toxic that any effort at all to make it saner is worth making.


    Paul
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
      Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

      Alan,I tend not to get into my political views in places I consider as business forums. That is a (very) personal choice.

      If the people doing this promoted their presence on Twitter as business-related, I can see your point. If they didn't, you're working with an unfounded expectation.

      Tuning out (un-following, in this case) is a perfectly rational response to a communication channel you don't get anything from. Trying to get other people to change their behavior based on your unfounded expectations might not be nearly as effective.

      As for the language, I tend to agree. The political environment in this country has become so toxic that any effort at all to make it saner is worth making.


      Paul
      I agree. I don't retort or debate, I just unfollow. I don't want to get into a political debate using a public medium I use mostly for business and networking.

      I would totally understand if I was following political junkies but I'm not and do not.

      To each their own of course it just seems odd to get have one post be about your new ebook or blog you want me to check out and the next is about that SOB candidate who is a scumbag, etc., etc. That gets old quick for me.

      Sure I'll watch the debate tonight but then I'm off twitterland tonight since I can just imagine the political tweets will be flying.
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Gram
    I would not tweet politics, religion, or anything like that. I might touch lightly on some of my beliefs and values in a tweet, because it's more personal, but I would not specifically take any sides unless I was running a business about politics or religion which I am not.
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Mayhew
      Politics and religion is always a touchy subject. I can understand your concern, but each person always has a personal opinion. A future president...
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    • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
      Maybe it depends on who your customers are?

      What if your customers are all in a certain industry and one candidate has pushed things that have been bad for that industry and could make things worse for that industry if elected. Is it a better idea to keep your mouth shut or to let people know about your opinions on the matter? If one candidate could really make things worse for your business, are you better off keeping quiet and hoping that person doesn't get elected, or are you better off risking losing a few customers and saying something in the hopes of getting enough people to vote for the other candidate so the "bad" candidate doesn't get elected?

      And, maybe too it's in how you present it, whether you present it as informing your customers or as just an attack and insults against a candidate?

      It may, too, depend upon whether you are a person of influence or not. Somebody with a "name" may say something politically, and it may turn some people away from buying from that person, but it may also bring other customers to him or her as well.

      If you don't fall into any of those situations, it's probably best to just keep your mouth shut. ;-) That's what I try to do!
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  • Profile picture of the author promediasys
    I agree with keeping politics out of your business unless it IS your business, otherwise you risk alienating half your audience.

    David
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    • From my experiance from posting political veiws in your business, is it will hurt you in the long run. My reason for this is 50% of the people go one way, and another 50% go the other it seems, of coarse this isn't the real numbers, but why loose 1/2 your business?

      If I was to post my thoughts about Walstreet or the Presidents 700 Billion Bail out then I'd do that on another site.
      So I will be able to do both and still keep my business
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
    To me it boils down to how you express your beliefs. If you are rude, condescending, nasty, hard-headed, insulting, or vicious when sharing religious or political beliefs - how are you going to act when it comes to business?

    Maybe without inceident, but then again, people are going to go by what they see.

    I say to each their own when it comes to such matters, and I would not hold one's belief against them. BUT you can bet I would think twice before doing business with anyone showing a blatant lack of tact and courtesy.

    All the best,
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  • Profile picture of the author Loren Woirhaye
    Now this here is a little interesting because I sent out an
    email the other day telling people on my list about Michael
    Moore's new film about his voter registration efforts.

    I did get some interesting comments back... one guy called
    my politics "appalling" - when the truth is I more or less said
    I didn't care for the policies of the current administration.

    Politics is a fairly charged area. I'd prefer it if more Americans
    got out to vote.... a scenario that would benefit one party
    and hurt another... but one that is undoubtedly to my mind
    better for our democracy.
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    • Profile picture of the author promediasys
      Case in point. In your message below aimed at furthering the discussion makes the assumption that if more people got out to vote it would "benefit one party and hurt another"...debatable...and that it would be undoubtedly, in your mind, better for the democracy if that happened...again depends on what side of the fence you sit on. Why take the chance of alienating your customer base if politics is off-topic for them?

      The other day Perry Marshall sent a message out to his list regarding autoresponders and 80s rock bands, and how Loverboy really sucked compared to The Police...particularly how "Working for the Weekend" hadn't aged nearly as well as "Every Breath You Take." I understood the point he was making (sort of) but I have to be honest with you, Loverboy may not fit into their red leather jeans the way they used to, but songs like "The Kid is Hot Tonight" and "Turn Me Loose" are still very much part of classic 80's rocking vocabulary. Did he make the calculation that everyone thinks Loverboy sucked or that they were only big in Canada? The world may never know but everytime I open one of his emails now, the first thing I think of was his Loverboy diss. Michael Moore anyone?

      -David




      Originally Posted by malibumentor View Post

      Now this here is a little interesting because I sent out an
      email the other day telling people on my list about Michael
      Moore's new film about his voter registration efforts.

      I did get some interesting comments back... one guy called
      my politics "appalling" - when the truth is I more or less said
      I didn't care for the policies of the current administration.

      Politics is a fairly charged area. I'd prefer it if more Americans
      got out to vote.... a scenario that would benefit one party
      and hurt another... but one that is undoubtedly to my mind
      better for our democracy.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alice Seba
        Originally Posted by promediasys View Post

        The world may never know but everytime I open one of his emails now, the first thing I think of was his Loverboy diss. Michael Moore anyone?
        -David
        Mr. Marshall is lucky I didn't happen to open that email from him. I can't believe it!

        On the political thing, I find it interesting and I actually don't mind if the people have something intelligent to say. I respect other people's beliefs (most of the time...gotta be honest), even if they don't match mine...so it doesn't fire me up like it may others.

        American politics and the way American's are so passionate about it is kind of fascinating to me. We have a federal election coming up on October 14 and other than the "elect me" signs on the sides of the streets, some mentions on the news, etc...it's pretty darned quiet around here.

        On the actual subject on whether it's bad for business, I don't know and I don't think you could make a general statement that it is. While you may repel some of your audience, you may create a deeper connection with those that share and appreciate your views. And then there will be a portion of your audience that won't care either way. How that affects your business can't really be measured.

        Alice
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        • Profile picture of the author TiffanyLambert
          Originally Posted by Alice Seba View Post

          On the political thing, I find it interesting and I actually don't mind if the people have something intelligent to say. I respect other people's beliefs (most of the time...gotta be honest), even if they don't match mine...so it doesn't fire me up like it may others.

          On the actual subject on whether it's bad for business, I don't know and I don't think you could make a general statement that it is. While you may repel some of your audience, you may create a deeper connection with those that share and appreciate your views. And then there will be a portion of your audience that won't care either way. How that affects your business can't really be measured.
          Alice
          (Clapping on the sidelines)

          I wanted to toss my $0.02 in here. As someone who is passionate about using social networking sites PROPERLY, I always have a hard time convincing marketers to sometimes stop being marketers and be SOCIAL on the SOCIAL networking site.

          It's important that you not just use these platforms as selling tools, but let your peers get to know you a little bit. It forms connections, as Alice wisely shared.

          Now I agree also with Michael Oksa who said it all depends on how you share your beliefs. If I'm going to chat politics on Twitter (which I have), I'm not going to turn into a 4th grader and be riduculous, which is what many grown men and women do when election time nears - it brings out the worst in some.

          But I LIKE to Tweet back and forth about a wide variety of topics with my followers and those I follow. I like getting personal Tweets that someone dear to me on my list is enduring a battle with her daughter's health because then I can extend my prayers and well wishes.

          I like discovering the Dr. Woo Ming was flirting with Jason Moffat. It's silly - it's not stuffy professional marketing. It lets you know what Moffat and Ming are like and it's FUN.

          We don't have a water cooler here to chat. We don't all go out after work for a drink at Cheers. Twitter is a little outlet where we can be ourselves. Yes, I share marketing tips, writing tips, etc. But if I don't share some of ME, well then I'd just be a social network spammer IMO

          Tiff <---who is undecided for the first time in her life and can't wait to watch the Tivo'd debate and Twitter my opinions about it.
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        • Profile picture of the author MizzCindy
          After reading Alice's reply, I realize mine was a bit cultural-centric (as in coming from an American perspective and assuming certain potential consequences when viewed by other Americans).

          Otherwise, I completely stand by what I said. I say this because I've specifically seen it play out on Twitter over the last several weeks - in a negative way.

          Yes, it is indeed important to cultivate relationships with folks on social networking sites, but topics like politics are an absolute minefield.

          Cindy

          Originally Posted by Alice Seba View Post

          Mr. Marshall is lucky I didn't happen to open that email from him. I can't believe it!

          On the political thing, I find it interesting and I actually don't mind if the people have something intelligent to say. I respect other people's beliefs (most of the time...gotta be honest), even if they don't match mine...so it doesn't fire me up like it may others.

          American politics and the way American's are so passionate about it is kind of fascinating to me. We have a federal election coming up on October 14 and other than the "elect me" signs on the sides of the streets, some mentions on the news, etc...it's pretty darned quiet around here.

          On the actual subject on whether it's bad for business, I don't know and I don't think you could make a general statement that it is. While you may repel some of your audience, you may create a deeper connection with those that share and appreciate your views. And then there will be a portion of your audience that won't care either way. How that affects your business can't really be measured.

          Alice
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    • Profile picture of the author OnlineMasterMind
      Originally Posted by malibumentor View Post

      Now this here is a little interesting because I sent out an
      email the other day telling people on my list about Michael
      Moore's new film about his voter registration efforts.

      I did get some interesting comments back... one guy called
      my politics "appalling" - when the truth is I more or less said
      I didn't care for the policies of the current administration.

      Politics is a fairly charged area. I'd prefer it if more Americans
      got out to vote.... a scenario that would benefit one party
      and hurt another... but one that is undoubtedly to my mind
      better for our democracy.
      IMO...

      People who express their political views... with the expectation that they're actually going to sway someone in this political environment....are jaded.

      Thus I agree w/ you Alan... unless of course someone wants to alienate 45-55% of people
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  • Profile picture of the author Loren Woirhaye
    Well - inevitably if more people voted things would go one way
    or the other. It would be presumptuous of me to assume which
    way elections would skew with something like twice as many
    people voting.

    I actually didn't find my email bad for my marketing at all. I think
    I got 2 unsubscribes and I know for a fact that the guy who was
    appalled by it wasn't going to be a buyer - our relationship was
    of me being an employer and him being an outside salesperson...
    who never produced any results.

    I appreciate conservative-minded Dan Kennedy's assertion that
    "If you aren't pissing somebody off you are doing something wrong,"
    and I feel that as marketers we have a great deal to gain by standing
    up for our values, whatever they may be. A person's character
    shows through when he or she takes a stand - and yes, this is
    repellent to those of oppositional-extreme viewpoints.

    I don't actually follow any marketers on Twitter, so I don't know
    what the actual issues are - but I'm guessing some guys are pretty
    hotheaded about politics and lack an ability to express their
    opinions in a genteel manner.

    It's easy to fall for the notion that because another person leans
    one way or another that they aren't moderate or open-minded
    in their political values and cannot see good sense in the positions
    of speakers on both sides of the aisle on many issues. It's easier
    for many people to see others in black-and-white terms - a
    luxury afforded too voters but one I, for one, would prefer not to
    see in national leadership.
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  • Profile picture of the author MizzCindy
    "Political Tweets - Bad for Business?"

    YES!

    There have been so many occasions within the last couple of months where folks have gotten a bit...enthusiastic...in supporting their candidate via Twitter, all while using the same profile they use for cultivating business and/or contacts. Not smart. Not everyone who's offended will unsubscribe. They will simply quietly resolve to not do business with you.

    Politics are so very personal. And one person's notion of 'moderate tone' can be perceived as complete and total hysteria by another. 140 characters is a very small opportunity to communicate clearly without being unintentionally offensive.

    Being involved in the political process is damned important. But don't put your professional persona in a position of being judged negatively for that participation. Many folks won't differentiate between your political leanings and your professional offerings. That can lose you customers unnecessarily.

    Cindy
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Lockwood
    This debate is funny, because the primary reason free speech was protected in the US Constitution was for political speech, which some here want to censor.

    A lot of people have fought and died to preserve rights like that, so others could come here and tell us not to speak.

    I think people can say what they want on Twitter, and others can choose to read it or not. It's easy enough to ignore.

    I've never seen the equivalent of a signup form where someone could promise to only post certain types of info.

    It's not surprising that people are making political comments a few weeks before an election. Wait 2 or 3 months and there will be very little of that.

    If someone else is not using Twitter the way you think they should, why do you really care? Just ignore them.
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    • Profile picture of the author MizzCindy
      Originally Posted by Chris Lockwood View Post

      This debate is funny, because the primary reason free speech was protected in the US Constitution was for political speech, which some here want to censor.
      Chris,

      If this is in response to my posts, then I have to say you are way off base! If it isn't, then please accept my apologies!

      I am in NO way advocating censorship. I am in NO way suggesting limiting anyone's right to say whatever they wish. I am in NO way supporting stripping anyone's freedom of speech rights. Absolutely not the point.

      The original question was quite simple: Are political tweets bad for business? My response was this: yes, they most certainly can be.

      That is an entirely different animal than saying I wish to see censorship happening on Twitter (political or otherwise).

      As a writer, I find it damned offensive that anyone would suggest I am advocating censorship! Again, if your post was not directed at me, then I apologize.

      Cindy
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      • Profile picture of the author Chris Lockwood
        Originally Posted by MizzCindy View Post

        If this is in response to my posts, then I have to say you are way off base! If it isn't, then please accept my apologies!
        No, my comment was about the thread in general, at least the idea some seem to have that people "shouldn't" put political stuff on Twitter. My point is you can write what you want there, and people can choose to read your stuff or not.

        It's just like all the other "shoulds" and "shouldn't"s people post here.
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    • Profile picture of the author promediasys
      Who is trying to censor anyone? The topic is whether or not it makes smart business sense to mix politics in your business (when politics isn't your business). It seems to me there is a time and place for everything and if you want to talk politics there are plenty of places to do it other than on your list. If taking the chance on alienating your customers is a chance you want to take, then by all means go for it.

      David

      Originally Posted by Chris Lockwood View Post

      This debate is funny, because the primary reason free speech was protected in the US Constitution was for political speech, which some here want to censor.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
        Chris,

        Have you read these posts? No one is censoring anyone. Man such drama. The question I'm posing is whether or not it's smart to mix your business with your politics. Not to stop folks from political tweets.

        It's like putting a banner of your political candidate on your business blog or sales letter. That doesn't make much sense to me either.
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    • Profile picture of the author louisef
      Originally Posted by Chris Lockwood View Post

      This debate is funny, because the primary reason free speech was protected in the US Constitution was for political speech, which some here want to censor.
      I don't think anyone wants to censor anyone else - it's more about whether expressing your beliefs will hurt your revenue.

      I am a political junkie and I am fired up about this election. I am even volunteering. But lots of the people who follow me on Twitter are clients and potential clients of my service business, and customers/potential customers of my products.

      They signed up because of my expertise in one area which is NOT politics. I can tweet about my chosen candidate if I want, but I'd better do it knowing that at least a few people will be turned off and stop buying things from me.

      Say whatever you want - just be aware that it has consequences.
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    • Profile picture of the author TimGross
      Originally Posted by Chris Lockwood View Post

      This debate is funny, because the primary reason free speech was protected in the US Constitution was for political speech, which some here want to censor
      This is a business forum and the original post said they thought Twittering their politics to customers and potential customers was a bad idea...

      If Twitter is being used purely socially, yeah, anyone can say whatever they want with no financial repercussions. But if you're cultivating Twitter contacts to make money from them down the road through sales, partnerships, etc, you might want to watch what you say.

      It has nothing to do with free speech, it has to do with common sense.

      If you go to a party and insult the host, he might ask you to leave and you can just go on with your life. If you go to your OFFICE party and insult your boss, he may fire you.

      Free speech gives you the right to call your significant other a dirty whore... Try that out and let me know how the free speech defense works out for you. :-)
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      • Profile picture of the author W.P. Allen
        Keep your politics and your business separate. Period.
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      • Profile picture of the author Chris Lockwood
        Originally Posted by TimGross View Post

        If you go to a party and insult the host, he might ask you to leave and you can just go on with your life. If you go to your OFFICE party and insult your boss, he may fire you.

        Free speech gives you the right to call your significant other a dirty whore... Try that out and let me know how the free speech defense works out for you. :-)
        What does the party analogy have to do with this? The equivalent would be going on Twitter and insulting Twitter itself.

        Who said anything about insulting anyone? I thought the issue was about political comments.

        I don't see what your other comment there has to do with anything relating to Twitter. Nice try changing the subject, though! (And some people might actually like being called names like that.)
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        • Profile picture of the author TimGross
          Originally Posted by Chris Lockwood View Post

          (And some people might actually like being called names like that.)
          Heh, just a little attempt at humor there.

          I was just trying to say that it sounded like the original poster was discussing a different situation than you were talking about:

          He was saying that he thought it was dangerous to suddenly start Twittering really strong political opinions IF his Twitter followers were business related (customers, potential customers). I agree with that observation, because you run the risk of offending your own customers if you say something that's wildly outside of their own view.

          He wasn't talking about bland political observations, he said, "Some are down right nasty", so I'm picturing comments like, "Can you believe this race is so close? Anyone who'd vote for (insert name) is too stupid to deserve to breathe". -Maybe not quite that strong, but "nasty" means the comments are harsh enough to offend. That's bad for business.

          The same thing applies to sending partisan emails to your subscriber list, sending out political literature with your product fulfillment, etc... All things being equal, you run the risk of turning off customers and potential customers, and losing future sales.

          Your response to the post was about free speech, and constitutionally protected free speech is an important topic, but not what the issue is when it comes to what you should say/not say to your customers and business associates.

          Sorry if my analogy in my previous post didn't hold up. :-)

          PS - Chris, clever idea adding sharks to your moat, you're way ahead of me, I just started digging my moat, more work than I thought. You're way ahead of me. (random reply from a different thread, just ignore...)
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  • Profile picture of the author TiffanyLambert
    Twittering and a list are two different things though.
    I would certainly never inject my politics into my list emails. Yikes!

    But Twitter is a social network for...socializing.

    And we need to emphasize CAN BE when you say it CAN BE bad for business. It sure can! If I was to go acting like an animal and putting down my customer's opinions on Twitter even, I'd sink my ship. lol

    But I'm smart enough not to do that Likewise, I'm smart enough to make sure anything I post in regards to politics isn't offensive.
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    • Profile picture of the author promediasys
      Tiffany I just checked out your Twitter page and I think if everyone handled it the way you do we'd all be better off

      I exited your page via the link to the elections Twitter and immediately saw someone making fun of McCain's melanoma. Maybe innocuous to most but as someone who's father is fighting a horrible battle with the disease right now...pretty low class. Free speech is great but I think if people just thought a little more (on both sides) about what they are free to say, we'd all have a better discourse.

      -David

      Originally Posted by TiffanyDow View Post

      Twittering and a list are two different things though.
      I would certainly never inject my politics into my list emails. Yikes!

      But Twitter is a social network for...socializing.

      And we need to emphasize CAN BE when you say it CAN BE bad for business. It sure can! If I was to go acting like an animal and putting down my customer's opinions on Twitter even, I'd sink my ship. lol

      But I'm smart enough not to do that Likewise, I'm smart enough to make sure anything I post in regards to politics isn't offensive.
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  • Profile picture of the author Loren Woirhaye
    The way I see it is that there's a 10,000 lb. elephant in the
    room with the economic things that are happening right now.
    The crisis occurred on the watch of the present administration,
    which, right or wrong, is being blamed by a lot of people
    for it's policies.

    I'm pretty sure business owners generally skew to the right,
    but it's pretty impossible not to ignore the war spending of
    the present administration combined with the Wall Street
    bailout - to pretend that this isn't something your customers
    are concerned about is...goofy.

    Whether we acknowledge the issue with the present government
    or not in our marketing is a personal, strategic choice. Be
    assured however that your Readers are thinking about the
    things that are going on - and Thinking People are concerned
    about the direction the country is headed in. I know I am.
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  • Profile picture of the author TimGross
    There are some marketers who make their religious and/or political views part of their persona; They purposefully turn a segment of the market off while specifically attracting another portion.

    That's a marketing decision, and it's one that you can make.

    But to NOT have your political or religious views front and center as part of your basic persona/character and then randomly start spewing off your strong opinions later to your subscribers/customers, well... That's only going to damage your relationship with part of your group.

    Everyone is obviously free to say whatever they want to whoever they want, but to do it and think it's "neutral" and not affecting the bottom-line of your business in some way is foolish.
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