Best Rewriting Tip | or your best artilce writing tip

by Tirmizi 22 replies
Dear All,


With no argument on the worth of rewriting now lets see what method do you choose to rewrite stuff, I mean if you have some good tip which others can also learn from ... I know usually people don't want to give out there secrets ... But for guys like me ... I love sharing stuff so that I always have to come up with something new and stay ahead in the game ;-)


Well for all you guys who are invovled in rewriting .. the biggest mistake which guys make is just choose one article and start rewriting it .. or use a software and just put one artilce in and take the output and slightly change it and then submit... well that is crappy content. might be unique bit still crappy won't bring you traffic, will earn you a few backlinks though ...


So the best advice from myside to you guys is ... Try to get three to five articles ... and then take poitners out of those and while you'll read it within like 5 or 10 mins , writing will not take more then 10 max .... but the content or the end product will be 1 unique " QUALITY ARTICLE"

So I hope many a guys might benefit from this tip... Never read it anywhere , used it ... so just thought people could benefit from it ....



Best Regards,



Tirmizi
#main internet marketing discussion forum #article marketing #article writing #content #rewriting
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  • Profile picture of the author Jeremy Kelsall
    I rewrite my articles in the following way....

    I write the original article and save it

    Open it back and rewrite the first paragraph directly below the original and delete the original

    Do the same for remaining paragraphs and then save it

    Repeat

    I find that by doing this I get a higher percentage of uniqueness from my first to last article and a larger percentage of unique content across the board.
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  • Profile picture of the author Zeus66
    Hey Tirmizi,

    I often go the opposite route, actually. I'll read an article and then take a few of its main points and expand on it to create a complete article. Most articles I read tend to be fairly shallow... making a general point about a broad topic and listing several things related to that topic. I like to dig into the individual points and expand them. Add some depth and fill it out, so to speak.

    When I do it right, I end up with maybe 5-6 separate articles that are unique and that I think readers will get something useful out of by reading. I know when I read about something that interests me but isn't something I already know a lot about, I'll often get sidetracked by one or two points and go research them more to get a deeper understanding. That's what I feel like I'm satisfying in others by this approach to creating articles. I don't always do it, but it can be a great way to get quantity without sacrificing quality.

    See ya,
    John
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    • Profile picture of the author Tirmizi
      Originally Posted by Zeus66 View Post

      Hey Tirmizi,

      I often go the opposite route, actually. I'll read an article and then take a few of its main points and expand on it to create a complete article. Most articles I read tend to be fairly shallow... making a general point about a broad topic and listing several things related to that topic. I like to dig into the individual points and expand them. Add some depth and fill it out, so to speak.

      When I do it right, I end up with maybe 5-6 separate articles that are unique and that I think readers will get something useful out of by reading. I know when I read about something that interests me but isn't something I already know a lot about, I'll often get sidetracked by one or two points and go research them more to get a deeper understanding. That's what I feel like I'm satisfying in others by this approach to creating articles. I don't always do it, but it can be a great way to get quantity without sacrificing quality.

      See ya,
      John
      Zeus,

      This is exactly what i was saying , 95 % of the times you'll come across the articles which are crappy, just written for the sake of writing artilce "number game" and not for provision of any quality to the reader. So thats why you need to read a few articles to find those " key Points " which you can easily expand .. and then write those unique but qualiyt artilces ...



      Tirmizi
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  • Profile picture of the author Chipt
    In my experience... writing and rewriting anything shares the same steps, principals, and mission...

    ... To answer a question, solve a problem, fulfill a need, explain something complicated... all directed at a normal person, not an SE.

    The obvious and worn out explanation is to 'write what someone wants to read.' To me that's like saying 'the sun can cause a sunburn.'

    Just my 2 -

    Chip Tarver
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    • Profile picture of the author Zeus66
      Chip, you're exactly right. I think too many people get caught up in "link thinking" and forget that real human beings will be reading those articles they submit. Isn't that why you want all the links, at the end of the day - to get real people to read your article and be convinced to visit your site? It amazes me all the truly awful stuff I read that was clearly written as fast as the author could put words on the page, just to get another link pointing to their site. Meanwhile, anyone with half a brain would read a couple sentences, laugh, and do anything BUT see what else that idiot has to say on a website. Harsh? Yeah, but also true.

      John
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      • Profile picture of the author marley
        I always use a different title, a different 1st paragraph and then re-write the remainder but sometimes i find i have better results just starting afresh from scratch.
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        • Profile picture of the author Keith Kogane
          I get involved in tons of markets I know nothing about, so what I do is find really long, meaty, authoritative articles to start with.

          Then, I break them down so that Each smaller point they make can be a separate article. So like, if I'm trying to get some articles for say, knitting. I find an "uber complete guide to knitting" that's just got at least a little info on every aspect.

          Then, I take what they wrote for each bit, and re-write it in my own words, targeting 250 to 500 words. If I can't elaborate, I just pad and expand. Do what you did in school to beef up your term papers, lol.

          So, at this point, I should have 10-20 or so short pieces of info for this niche. I can load those up to post on a schedule in a blog, or drip them out to article sites.

          If I happen to find that (in this example) knitting is a hot niche and I'm getting some visits/opt-ins/sales, whatever I'm sending traffic to - if it's working... then I go to phase 2.

          Phase 2 is I hire two freelance writers, but the trick is I get them super cheap because I don't need them to actually write anything. I strictly put them on re-writes. 2 kinds.

          I have one writer take the articles I send them and do re-writes just like I did earlier - just re-do the piece in your own words. Vary sentence length, number of sentences per paragraph, synonyms, whatever. Nothing fancy, just re-wording. But I have them leave the CONTENT in each paragraph the same. This is important.

          Then, I have the 2nd writer doing re-writes of both mine and the first writers stuff, but I have this writer do it sentence by sentence instead of by paragraph. Don't vary anything - just re-work each sentence so it says the same thing, but with different words.

          So when I get the work back, I have basically, 4 variants of the same article. But I don't stop there. I have a little "spinner" script that I load these variants into that basically randomizes the sentences and paragraphs from all the stuff. (EDIT: It keeps the paragraphs and sentences in order, is what I mean, so the article has the exact same informational content each time - the words/structure is unique to a certain % in each variation) What I then have is almost infinite articles that are unique at least to some degree. The more times I get the content re-written, the more variation my "article generator" now has. I just hit "Refresh" and Instant New Article.

          So for each niche that turns out successfully, I end up with a dozen or so of these article generator scripts. I've done a number of things with the output of that.

          I send to blog networks and pay to post with my backlinks.

          I use these to post to my own blogs.

          I use these to post to niche forums.

          I use these to post to article networks.

          Better yet, in one particular niche where the content is proving to be more profitable the more content I throw at it, I've had my coder program my article generators to email 5 to 10 unique articles a day to a freelancer that I pay to post them everywhere he can. He gets paid per post, and sends back proof. It's like, 0.10 or something per post, and he's cool about finding good places to post, because he knows I won't pay him for bad ones.

          Then, I take all the links that guy sends me as proof of his work, and I send those to ANOTHER guy that works for me, and HE social bookmarks all the stuff.

          Now, this particular niche has proved pretty fruitful because no one is in it. But if people jump on it like they have in other markets that are strangled with marketers, gee what can I do...

          How about sell packaged output from my article generators to all those "competing" marketers?

          Yeah - that's how you make money with content, guys.
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          • Profile picture of the author Simon_Sezs
            I actually use diction software....I read a couple articles, tab them out and them start running my mount, editing on the fly. This has drastically cut down my time writing and I can pump out articles on the fly...
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          • Profile picture of the author Glenn Leader
            Originally Posted by Keith Kogane View Post


            Better yet, in one particular niche where the content is proving to be more profitable the more content I throw at it, I've had my coder program my article generators to email 5 to 10 unique articles a day to a freelancer that I pay to post them everywhere he can. He gets paid per post, and sends back proof. It's like, 0.10 or something per post, and he's cool about finding good places to post, because he knows I won't pay him for bad ones.

            Then, I take all the links that guy sends me as proof of his work, and I send those to ANOTHER guy that works for me, and HE social bookmarks all the stuff.
            These are a couple of very good ideas, thank you, I might steal them
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  • Profile picture of the author Brandon Tanner
    Straight from the "old school" WF, this is one of the best posts I've ever read on article writing. Much of it could be easily applied to re-writing as well...

    The Warrior Forum - How to write articles on any subject
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    • Profile picture of the author azgold
      After jotting down my researched points, I write the original. Depending on how much and type of info I find, I may or may not use all the info in the first piece. Each subsequent article has a different slant, and by the time I'm done, all the info is usually used somewhere. It has to fit sensibly, of course.

      I don't look at the original to do the rewrites, I start new, approaching the subject from a different angle. Remember, I've already done one, so I have the topic fresh in mind and I've learned a few things about it first time around. For me, that's the best way to keep the content unique. Afterwards, during the editing, I check keywords, links, etc. to make sure I have whatever is necessary for the job.

      Doing it this way ensures that first and foremost, the work is actually something of value - all stuff, no fluff.

      Works for me, anyway.
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      • Profile picture of the author BeeJay
        My method is probably a mix between Tirmizi's and Keiths.

        If I'm researching something new or reasonably new to me, I'll find several articles or resources and look at the points in those articles that really stand out or offer valuable information. I'll collect those points and put them in a spreadsheet in such a way that they flow, then expand on them and combine those into one or several articles.

        I do this because I quite like creating an article series, rather than just one or two articles on a topic which stand alone. Don't get me wrong, I do use stand alone articles, like 'Top 5' or '3 Steps' or something like that. But I've had good results from doing a series which link back to a blog, site, lense or hub which contain the rest of the series. For example, I did a series of articles on adoption, starting with a general overview, then an article on eligability, then a short article on the steps involved in adoption, then another resource article on how to get started, then an article setting out a checklist of contacts and things to do, finishing on the legal ramifications of adoption. Readers can then take away the precise info they need, or find a larger resource in my other articles (which of course ultimately point towards a product or service), but I've found it helps to develop an authorative presence.

        To be fair, I knew quite a bit about that particular subject matter already, but I still did my due diligence with research. I'm quite comfortable re-writing myself when time permits, but otherwise rely on some decent article writers.
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        • Profile picture of the author azgold
          Ben....you're a hubber? What's your hub name?
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          • Profile picture of the author kumar
            Guys,

            Reviving this thread. I have just got a rewriting project. The client requires a rewrite of an article (approx. 500 words) in about 20 mins and it should be at least 75% rewritten. My newbie questions:

            I rewrote an article and got it checked with a duplicate checked tool and it showed my rewritten content as 50% duplicate. I found it a bit weird that the tool also counts conjunctions and prepositions such as 'and', 'is' etc. too as duplicate. Is this how duplicate content is supposed to be measured?

            Isn't 75% unique content too much? I can try to negotiate with him, if that's the case.
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            • Profile picture of the author Glenn Leader
              Originally Posted by kumar View Post

              Guys,

              Reviving this thread. I have just got a rewriting project. The client requires a rewrite of an article (approx. 500 words) in about 20 mins and it should be at least 75% rewritten. My newbie questions:

              I rewrote an article and got it checked with a duplicate checked tool and it showed my rewritten content as 50% duplicate. I found it a bit weird that the tool also counts conjunctions and prepositions such as 'and', 'is' etc. too as duplicate. Is this how duplicate content is supposed to be measured?

              Isn't 75% unique content too much? I can try to negotiate with him, if that's the case.
              Try thus to give you an idea about good values to expect.

              compare two documents of similar lengths, but completely
              different niches. You'll discover that you could get 85%
              uniqueness or less.

              HTH

              Glenn
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              • Profile picture of the author kumar
                Originally Posted by Glenn Leader View Post

                Try thus to give you an idea about good values to expect.

                compare two documents of similar lengths, but completely
                different niches. You'll discover that you could get 85%
                uniqueness or less.

                HTH

                Glenn
                Hello Glenn,

                Thanks for your response, but I am not sure I understand it. What I will receive from the buyer is an original article and I have to rewrite it. The original article should be changed by atleast 75% so that it does not look or feel like the original even though I may be using the same points. This is what he said when I asked him how he will measure that 75% article is rewritten.

                Any suggestions?
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                Life is not a sprint, its a marathon. A bad start does not really matter too much

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                • Profile picture of the author Glenn Leader
                  Originally Posted by kumar View Post

                  Hello Glenn,

                  Thanks for your response, but I am not sure I understand it. What I will receive from the buyer is an original article and I have to rewrite it. The original article should be changed by atleast 75% so that it does not look or feel like the original even though I may be using the same points. This is what he said when I asked him how he will measure that 75% article is rewritten.

                  Any suggestions?
                  What I'm saying is that your buyer is probably asking too much from you.
                  If two completely different articles from different niches are only (lets say)
                  85% unique, it's a big ask to get a rewritten article close to that figure.
                  You might as well write from scratch.

                  HTH

                  Glenn
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                  • Profile picture of the author kumar
                    Originally Posted by Glenn Leader View Post

                    What I'm saying is that your buyer is probably asking too much from you.
                    If two completely different articles from different niches are only (lets say)
                    85% unique, it's a big ask to get a rewritten article close to that figure.
                    You might as well write from scratch.

                    HTH

                    Glenn
                    Thanks Glenn, this clarifies.
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                    Life is not a sprint, its a marathon. A bad start does not really matter too much

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  • Profile picture of the author Ralf Skirr
    Here are some 'micro-strategies' on word or sentence level. Maybe you guys can add some more.

    • Use '-ing' and 'non-ing' forms and 'to'. 'Most people hate article rewriting. Most people hate to rewrite articles.
    • Use synonyms. write an article, create an article, develop an article.
    • Use opposites with a negation. 'Most people hate article rewriting. Most people don't like to rewrite articles.'
    • Shift referential indexes. WHO do you relate to what you're talking about?
      'Most people love article rewriting.
      Most people love to rewrite their articles.
      Maybe you love article rewriting.
      Maybe you love rewriting your articles.
      Most writers love article rewriting.
      I don't know about you, but I love rewriting articles. :rolleyes:
    Each of those micro formats in itself doesn't do much to a sentence, but once you're used to it and mix them you'll rephrase a sentence pretty fast.
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    • Profile picture of the author Glenn Leader
      Originally Posted by Ralf Michael Skirr View Post

      Here are some 'micro-strategies' on word or sentence level. Maybe you guys can add some more.

      • Use '-ing' and 'non-ing' forms and 'to'. 'Most people hate article rewriting. Most people hate to rewrite articles.
      • Use synonyms. write an article, create an article, develop an article.
      • Use opposites with a negation. 'Most people hate article rewriting. Most people don't like to rewrite articles.'
      • Shift referential indexes. WHO do you relate to what you're talking about?
        'Most people love article rewriting.
        Most people love to rewrite their articles.
        Maybe you love article rewriting.
        Maybe you love rewriting your articles.
        Most writers love article rewriting.
        I don't know about you, but I love rewriting articles. :rolleyes:
      Each of those micro formats in itself doesn't do much to a sentence, but once you're used to it and mix them you'll rephrase a sentence pretty fast.
      These are the kind of techniques I discuss in my
      article rewriting videos I recorded for my customers.
      They work very well indeed.

      Glenn
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      • Profile picture of the author Ralf Skirr
        Originally Posted by Glenn Leader View Post

        These are the kind of techniques I discuss in my
        article rewriting videos I recorded for my customers.
        They work very well indeed.

        Glenn
        Hi Glenn,

        can you add a few of your own? It's not likely that we came up with the exact same list, is it?

        Ralf
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        • Profile picture of the author Ephrils
          I've got simple advice that is not often easy to follow if the niche is new to you.

          Write a lot. Write about the niche a lot. I rewrote lots of articles when I first got in to try and learn the rules and rhythm, so to speak, of how it's supposed to read and what people are looking for.

          I've now done over 50 articles in this niche and I can now spit out the content like a laser printer without having to look for any source material anymore. It's remarkably freeing when you can simply pick a keyword and write around the content without thinking twice.
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