Thank you Aweber for exposing all my email addresses to SPAMMERS. Thank you so much!

47 replies
First of all, please note:
This is *NOT* an assumption. I got PROOF.
Aweber servers must have been HACKED.

I'm getting lots of SPAM emails with subjects like
"Pharmacy Best OFfer!!!" and "Best Love love Pill!!!" etc. etc.

The content of those emails is an image (with a link).
But since in my email system the image display is switched off by default I can't view those images (and don't want to switch them on) but it's pretty obvious what kind of emails that must be.
And they come in in batches. All with identical subjects and very similar or identical links.

First I thought it was just one marketer whose server got hacked.
But then I checked the other emails and because of the unique anti-spam system that I have I can tell exactly what's going on.

In other words, I can prove: It's not just some marketer.
The issue is:
I'm getting those spam emails to *ALL* email addresses that I used when opting in to various marketers who use Aweber.
And ONLY those of my emails are affected that I used to opt in to marketers who use Aweber.

So, dear Aweber, thank you soo much for exposing all my emails addresses to spammers!
Good job!

Honestly, personally I don't use Aweber's system as a customer.
But if I were I'd sue the hell out of them.

You can't tell me that this sort of this "could happen to everyone" or something like that.
It is their first and foremost responsibility to ENSURE that this kind of thing cannot happen.
And if they let it happen like in this case then they are fully responsible for that.
#addresses #aweber #email #exposing #spam #spammer #spammers
  • Profile picture of the author Zubair Zm
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  • Profile picture of the author Nightowl
    That explains the sudden influx of crap to one of my mailboxes (which had been clean until now). I was beginning to think someone whose list I'd opted in to had sold my email. This is worse. Ouch.

    - Nightowl
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  • Profile picture of the author SuzanneH
    For what it's worth, I've got a few of my e-mail addresses on my own lists at Aweber and I haven't been getting anything. Checked my spam box, too. The e-mail addresses are from my own domain, gmail, yahoo and hotmail. Doesn't prove anything either way, but I thought I'd just toss that in there...

    Suzanne
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    • Profile picture of the author RobJones
      Originally Posted by SuzanneH View Post

      For what it's worth, I've got a few of my e-mail addresses on my own lists at Aweber and I haven't been getting anything. Checked my spam box, too. The e-mail addresses are from my own domain, gmail, yahoo and hotmail. Doesn't prove anything either way, but I thought I'd just toss that in there...

      Suzanne
      I assume that Aweber has more than one data base.
      So, if you haven't gotten spam yet then it's either because you got lucky and your emails were in a data base that didn't get touched/hacked by spammers
      OR... because you simply haven't received your spam emails yet.
      With a large data base it can take days to deliver all emails (depending on how quickly or slowly the emails are being sent. spammers wouldn't want to send too quickly because that would block their emails)
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      • Profile picture of the author ksburgess
        I have one email box that I subscribe to all IM lists with - most of the Aweber, and my spam count is at 0. I'll keep an eye on it over the next few days.
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  • Profile picture of the author RebeccaL
    I havent seen an increase in spam to my aweber emails. I get a lot of that sort of spam usually anyway. I'll wait for an announcement for Aweber before assuming anything.
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    • Profile picture of the author RobJones
      Originally Posted by RebeccaL View Post

      I'll wait for an announcement for Aweber before assuming anything.
      So, you believe Aweber would "announce" something that would get them bombarded by million dollar law suits?
      Wow! Congrats!
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      • Profile picture of the author RebeccaL
        Originally Posted by RobJones View Post

        So, you believe Aweber would "announce" something that would get them bombarded by million dollar law suits?
        Wow! Congrats!
        You've never seen a company announce that they've had a security breach?
        It's called honesty. Banks do it, Microsoft's done it, so have hundreds of other companies. So yes, if something major has happened then I would expect Aweber to contact their customers to explain.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    I'm sure Aweber has their backside covered in their terms of use and that a team of lawyers made sure it was buttoned down tight. Doubt if there will be any lawsuits.

    I use Aweber and haven't been getting any more spam than usual. I'm not doubting that you are, just that maybe they got the hole plugged before too many lists were compromised.

    I've been thinking of switching from Aweber to Get Response (for other reasons). Anyone got anything good or bad to say about Get Response?
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    • Profile picture of the author RobJones
      Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

      I've been thinking of switching from Aweber to Get Response (for other reasons). Anyone got anything good or bad to say about Get Response?
      Yes, I used to recommend Getresponse rather than Aweber.
      But after Getresponse's latest update that they had in summer I changed from fan to a hater of Getresponse!
      Seriously, even *MONTHS* after that update their system was sooo filled with bugs...
      All kinds of bugs, stupid bugs, bugs that even a 14-year old programmer wouldn't make...
      Long story short: Their system got so much WORSE after that "update" it turned me from fan to a hater.
      I'm getting all my clients off of Getresponse.
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      • Profile picture of the author markgilbert
        Originally Posted by RobJones View Post

        ... after Getresponse's latest update that they had in summer I changed from fan to a hater of Getresponse!
        Seriously, even *MONTHS* after that update their system was sooo filled with bugs....
        Could you be more specific about the "bugs" you are talking about, or have experienced Rob. I'm not looking forward to any surprises when we launch January 4th.
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        • Profile picture of the author RobJones
          Originally Posted by markgilbert View Post

          Could you be more specific about the "bugs" you are talking about, or have experienced Rob.
          Yes, I could.
          There were literally DOZENS of bugs. I'm not kidding.
          After the first 2-3 bugs I was still forgiving.
          But then I got so annoyed that I saw only one solution for my client:
          Run away from Getresponse as fast as you can.

          And because of my earlier experience with Aweber I couldn't recommend Aweber to him either.

          So, what I'm recommending now is setting up your own server (can be a virtual private server, VPS, is fully sufficient for this, available for $20-40/month), a server dedicated to sending emails only (and hosting the email data base).
          And then setup a self-hosted email marketing software to do the job.
          This does need a little knowledge and maintenance.
          So, your total monthly cost will be more than the $20-40 for the VPS.
          But: with a little knowledge and maintenance you can get a BETTER delivery rate than any "Getresponses" or "Awebers" ever possibly could.
          AND:
          You have 100% control over your stuff and can send unlimited emails to unlimited lists.
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    • Profile picture of the author markgilbert
      Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

      I use Aweber and haven't been getting any more spam than usual. I'm not doubting that you are, just that maybe they got the hole plugged before too many lists were compromised.

      I've been thinking of switching from Aweber to Get Response (for other reasons). Anyone got anything good or bad to say about Get Response?
      Dennis, see the other thread on this same issue. There is NO QUESTION that AWEBER is at the heart of this spam. HOW? Can't be known absolutely. But I have enough personal experience, and have given details, along with others on the other thread

      Regarding GetResponse vs Aweber, we use the former because of their robust API we can integrate with our PHP code. Aweber doesn't do this. How that helps us is by enabling us to pass certain variables to our GetResponse lists that helps us insert behind URLs to identify things like affiliate URLs, sponsor information, etc. That comes in VERY valuable, if you are familiar with this kind of personalization in your code.
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      • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
        Originally Posted by markgilbert View Post

        Dennis, see the other thread on this same issue. There is NO QUESTION that AWEBER is at the heart of this spam.
        I wasn't doubting anyone, just saying it doesn't seem to be happening to all Aweber users. Actually, I have some other serious issues with them, which is why I'm looking at other autoresponder services.

        Speaking of...thanks for your input on Get Response, and your comment as well, Rob. I don't want to hijack this thread, so if anyone else has any autoresponder recommendations maybe it would be best to PM me.
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      • Profile picture of the author RobJones
        Originally Posted by markgilbert View Post

        AWEBER is at the heart of this spam. HOW? Can't be known absolutely.
        Yes, it can!
        I know this with absolute 100% certainty.

        Always when I opt in to some list I (automatically) generate a unique email address in the format:
        6iq8hmzjc9@domain.com

        So, the alias of that email is a *completely random* 10 character string consisting of characters and numbers randomly mixed together.
        In other words, there is NO WAY spammers could ever generate those emails by trying different character combinations for that domain.
        That's because the number of possible combination is so huge that it would take the spammers many HUNDREDS OF YEARS to send emails to all possible combinations of emails on just that one domain that I'm using.
        So, it's absolutely impossible anyone could ever "guess" my email addresses.
        And for every opt-in I use a brand new unique email address.

        That's how I can tell where I have used which email address.
        I can trace each and every of those automatically generated email addresses to the website where I've originally entered it into an opt-in form.

        And if I suddenly get a flood of spam emails *exclusively* to those of these unique email addresses that were normally used by the Aweber system and by their system only
        (i.e. marketers who were using Aweber to send follow-up or newsletter emails)
        then there ONLY ONE possible explanation for this:
        Aweber's data base has been hacked!

        You can't tell me that some hacker was just using brute force to get passwords of some Aweber accounts.
        That might happen to *some* accounts, yes.
        But that CANNOT happen to ALL accounts.
        I am on MANY lists and ALL of the corresponding email addresses got compromised.
        There is *no way* ALL of the smart marketers would use weak passwords for their Aweber accounts.
        And besides:
        We already have one user in the other thread (Shaun OReilly) who is using an automatically generated random 12-character password for his Aweber account.
        There is absolutely no way to hack such password by using a brute force attack.
        That would take many THOUSANDS of years.

        Conclusion:
        There is only ONE way how this could happen.
        The ONLY way this could happen is if someone would get the emails directly from Aweber's data base.
        That's it.
        Anything else is *technically impossible*.
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        • Profile picture of the author Laura B
          Well, that explains the deluge of spam I've been getting. I used to get less than half a dozen a day, and now there are dozens and dozens every day.
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        • Profile picture of the author markgilbert
          Originally Posted by RobJones View Post

          I know this with absolute 100% certainty....
          ....There is only ONE way how this could happen.
          The ONLY way this could happen is if someone would get the emails directly from Aweber's data base.
          That's it.
          Anything else is *technically impossible*.
          Ummmm Rob, so just to be the devil's advocate (and just for the record, I don't even like the guy ;-), are you telling me with 100% absolute certainty, that it's *technically impossible* for a hacker to "sniff" a form on a NONsecure website and capture every email address being submitted through that form?
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          • Profile picture of the author RobJones
            Originally Posted by markgilbert View Post

            Ummmm Rob, so just to be the devil's advocate (and just for the record, I don't even like the guy ;-), are you telling me with 100% absolute certainty, that it's *technically impossible* for a hacker to "sniff" a form on a NONsecure website and capture every email address being submitted through that form?
            Please just READ what I wrote above to understand why it's technically impossible.
            I've described it in detail and in plain English so that everyone can understand that.
            Yes, it's absolutely technically impossible for what you've described to cause what happened *in my* case.
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            • Profile picture of the author markgilbert
              Originally Posted by RobJones View Post

              Please just READ what I wrote above to understand why it's technically impossible. I've described it in detail and in plain English so that everyone can understand that.
              Yes, it's absolutely technically impossible for what you've described to cause what happened *in my* case.
              With all due respect buddy, you did NOT answer my question. I speak very good English, I read your post twice, and there is NOWHERE in your post that answered my question. You simply made a bunch of conclusions based on the assumption that the ONLY way someone could have gotten your email address was by hacking AWEBERS server. I gave you another possibility, but you didn't answer it in this, nor your earlier post.

              Additionally, you didn't give me any SPECIFICS that gave any details that described what you called "bugs" in GetResponse. A SPECIFIC DETAIL might say something like, "their system doesn't mail all my followup emails to all email addresses on my list," or "after implementing their API with my order system, it didn't transfer my subscribers from one list to another". Do you have any SPECIFICS like that to describe what you are calling "BUGS"?
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  • Profile picture of the author markgilbert
    They stand to lose much more by admitting, than they do by concealing. Unless there is absolute proof, there would be no advantage that outweighed the disadvantages of spilling the beans.
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    • Profile picture of the author Gary Killops
      Ahhh, so that explains where these emails are coming from. I have been getting the same spam emails on an email address that was clean up until a day or so ago.
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  • Profile picture of the author cypherslock
    Check out ImnicaMail by Warrior Richelo Killian. I've been using them and its been great. Solid support and he is implementing changes based on customer feedback. Auto responders for marketers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    That's pretty strong evidence, Rob. If only one of your email addresses was getting spammed it could be one low-life marketer sold your email address to a spammer, but if it's several unique addresses that more or less rules that out.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kevin_Hutto
    It is just sad to me that these spammers still have to do stupid stuff like this... It is just too easy to make money legitimately to have to spam the way they do...
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    • Profile picture of the author lazfin
      Rob, I am no aweber expert, and you may be 100% correct in your conclusion. And if this is true, it's awful! You have probably already ruled this out, but just in case, have you checked to make sure that your personal PC or your email server have not been hacked?
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      • Profile picture of the author RobJones
        Originally Posted by lazfin View Post

        Rob, I am no aweber expert, and you may be 100% correct in your conclusion. And if this is true, it's awful! You have probably already ruled this out, but just in case, have you checked to make sure that your personal PC or your email server have not been hacked?
        As you can read above I'm not a customer of Aweber.
        So, no need to check some of "my email servers" regarding this issue.

        And regarding my personal PC:
        Yes, this is completely ruled out in my specific case.

        Those unique anti-spam email addresses are neither on my PC nor on some of my servers.
        Those email addresses are automatically generated by a third-party system in a second when I'm filling out a form.
        Those anti-spam email addresses are forwarding emails only.
        Whenever I fill out a form a unique forwarding email address is generated.
        Not just for Aweber forms. For all kinds of forms.
        And as I wrote above ONLY those anti-spam emails are affected that I used for Aweber forms.
        This completely rules out any kind of "virus" or failure on my PC or some of my servers or the said third-party servers.
        Because in this case ALL of my anti-spam emails would be affected and not just those that I used for Aweber forms.
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  • Profile picture of the author RobJones
    @markgilbert
    Yes, your question is completely answered in one of my posts above.
    And yes, your post does indicate that you have not properly read my post.
    Nowhere in my post I'm wring about "one" email address.
    I'm writing about MANY MANY MANY email addresses.
    Got it?

    What you've described could happen to one of my email addresses, yes.
    It could even happen to a few of them.
    But if you properly read my post you'll understand what I'm talking about.
    I've described it precisely and in plain English.

    P.S.
    Don't confuse Aweber with Getresponse.
    Those are two different animals.

    P.P.S.
    I've described some of the specific *Getresponse* bugs some time ago in one of my posts in this forum.
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    • Profile picture of the author markgilbert
      Originally Posted by RobJones View Post

      @markgilbert
      Yes, your question is completely answered in one of my posts above.
      And yes, your post does indicate that you have not properly read my post.
      Nowhere in my post I'm wring about "one" email address.
      I'm writing about MANY MANY MANY email addresses.
      Got it?
      You're not reading my posts. If you were, you would understand the question had NOTHING to do with your system and use of "non-guessable" email addresses. But after two attempts, I'm giving up. One of us isn't all that good at English, I guess :rolleyes:

      I'm not doubting the HIGH ODDS that Aweber was somehow involved in this (as you'll see from my previous posts here and on the other thread). That's 99% a given. But to say with 100% certainty, ***HOW*** Aweber was "involved".... well, that's just..... hmmmm..... well, let's just say, nobody can PROVE that with even 99% certainty. It you're so certain, let me know when you've found the lawyer that will handle the class action suit?
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      • Profile picture of the author RobJones
        Originally Posted by markgilbert View Post

        You're not reading my posts. If you were, you would understand the question had NOTHING to do with your system and use of "non-guessable" email addresses. But after two attempts, I'm giving up. One of us isn't all that good at English, I guess :rolleyes:

        I'm not doubting the HIGH ODDS that Aweber was somehow involved in this (as you'll see from my previous posts here and on the other thread). That's 99% a given. But to say with 100% certainty, ***HOW*** Aweber was "involved".... well, that's just..... hmmmm..... well, let's just say, nobody can PROVE that with even 99% certainty. It you're so certain, let me know when you've found the lawyer that will handle the class action suit?
        @markgilbert
        You are talking about ONE "nonsecure website."
        Yes, what you are saying is entirely possible for *ONE* nonsecure website.
        It is also possible for 2 or 3 of them.

        BUT it is absolutely impossible FOR ALL OF THEM!
        This is technically impossible.

        And yes, I can prove what I've described above with absolute 100% certainty (not some 99%). It's because of the special anti-spam system that I'm using.
        *In this particular case* it allows me to prove with 100% certainty that the spammers must have gotten the emails directly from Aweber's data base.

        And regarding the lawsuit:
        I'm not a customer of Aweber. I just opted in to some lists of marketers who are using Aweber.
        If I were Aweber's customer then for sure I'd want to sue them.
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        • Profile picture of the author BlueM
          Yeah,
          I'll have to say as well that my spam intake hasn't been changing at all

          and I joined aweber probably a few weeks ago.

          Blue
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  • Profile picture of the author mgkimsal
    @robjones:

    You have some sort of setup that creates the random email address on every form you fill out, from what I'm reading. Does it also register that with your mail server indicating it's a 'real' address, as opposed to a generic 'catch all' address?

    So, for example, j83h9nqwe3fbrj@domain.com is usable, but j83h9nqwe3fbri@domain.com would get rejected by your mail server?

    If so, could you share what setup you're using please?
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    • Profile picture of the author RobJones
      Originally Posted by mgkimsal View Post

      @robjones:

      You have some sort of setup that creates the random email address on every form you fill out, from what I'm reading. Does it also register that with your mail server indicating it's a 'real' address, as opposed to a generic 'catch all' address?

      So, for example, j83h9nqwe3fbrj@domain.com is usable, but j83h9nqwe3fbri@domain.com would get rejected by your mail server?
      Yes, absolutely!
      Only emails from registered disposable email addresses get delivered.


      Originally Posted by mgkimsal View Post

      If so, could you share what setup you're using please?
      This setup is available through a Firefox addon and is called Sxipper.
      Here is their website: Sxipper: Welcome to Sxipper
      It has several different functions one of them being creating disposable email addresses on the fly for any given form.
      Those email addresses are always active. Unless I specifically disable some of them.
      All active sxipper emails are just forwarding to me.
      They are not on my PC and not on my servers.

      Once an email goes through the sxipper system they change the "To" address to my normal gmail address.
      and add at the very bottom of the email this:
      =======================
      This email is from the Sxipper PRO Disposable Email Service
      Forwarding can be managed by clicking on the link below:
      https://sxipper.net/a/[unique random characters string]
      =======================

      Once I click on that link I can see which disposable email has been used
      and which website I've entered that email on.
      I then copy that website's domain and paste it into Gmail's search field to find earlier emails that are associated with that domain.
      One click on the first of those earlier emails and I can see Aweber links in it.
      Conclusion: The particular disposable email has been first used in Aweber's system.

      ONLY those of my disposable emails are affected by this recent spam flood that were previously used in Aweber's system.


      Theoretically spammers could just get into one or a few Aweber accounts.
      (for example because some people use weak passwords)
      But this could never happen to ALL Aweber accounts.
      And besides, a user in the other thread (Shaun OReilly) is using an automatically generated random 12-character password for his Aweber account.
      A brute force password attack would take thousands of years to hack an account with such strong password.
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  • Profile picture of the author The GoTo Team
    So if the site was hacked how is it the site's fault?




    -Trevor
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    • Profile picture of the author All Night Cafe
      I've had the same experiece but have also found that the emails with spam haven't been excessive.

      I'm luck, I have a teenager and have shown her what to look for.

      While she is emailing her friends she deletes all spam.

      I love using Aweber. I've been with them for 5 years.

      Some things we have to just deal with, but that's IM marketing
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    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi Rob,

      This setup is available through a Firefox addon and is called Sxipper.
      Here is their website: Sxipper: Welcome to Sxipper
      It has several different functions one of them being creating disposable email addresses on the fly for any given form.
      Those email addresses are always active. Unless I specifically disable some of them.
      All active sxipper emails are just forwarding to me.
      They are not on my PC and not on my servers.
      So in theory, sxipper could have been hacked?

      In which case, this is incorrect -

      This is *NOT* an assumption. I got PROOF.
      Aweber servers must have been HACKED.
      Also -

      I know this with absolute 100% certainty.

      Always when I opt in to some list I (automatically) generate a unique email address in the format:
      6iq8hmzjc9@domain.com

      So, the alias of that email is a *completely random* 10 character string consisting of characters and numbers randomly mixed together.
      In other words, there is NO WAY spammers could ever generate those emails by trying different character combinations for that domain.
      That's because the number of possible combination is so huge that it would take the spammers many HUNDREDS OF YEARS to send emails to all possible combinations of emails on just that one domain that I'm using.
      So, it's absolutely impossible anyone could ever "guess" my email addresses.
      And for every opt-in I use a brand new unique email address.

      That's how I can tell where I have used which email address.
      I can trace each and every of those automatically generated email addresses to the website where I've originally entered it into an opt-in form.

      And if I suddenly get a flood of spam emails *exclusively* to those of these unique email addresses that were normally used by the Aweber system and by their system only
      (i.e. marketers who were using Aweber to send follow-up or newsletter emails)
      then there ONLY ONE possible explanation for this:
      Aweber's data base has been hacked!
      If you have opted in to a 3rd party list, then the person who pays aweber to run that account could have extracted your email and sold it to spammers, or spammed it themselves from a different address. If the opt in form was made by the site owner, it could be the site owner (not aweber) who has been breached, or has deliberately compromised their own opt in form.

      In either case, again, this is incorrect -

      This is *NOT* an assumption. I got PROOF.
      Aweber servers must have been HACKED.
      Even if it happens on multiple email adresses on multiple aweber lists, this is still not proof.

      BUT, there are others in this thread that are NOT talking about using an email which has been given to a 3rd party opt-in form (in which case it could be viewed by the list owner without being hacked) therefore that does suggest that they might have been hacked.

      But regardless, you are saying that another business MUST have been hacked and compromised and that you have proof, when in fact you have no personal proof.

      Goto team said -

      So if the site was hacked how is it the site's fault?
      Good point. Do they guarantee that they won't be hacked? I doubt it.
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      • Profile picture of the author DaveDaveDave
        Originally Posted by ExRat View Post

        Hi Rob,

        So in theory, sxipper could have been hacked?

        In which case, this is incorrect -
        Hey ExRat, your arguments may work well if just this sxipper user was being spammed, but do you think that the rest of us who are reporting the same "spamming of multiple-email address previously known about by aweber" issues are all using that service? And also, you would expect that all the names generated by sxipper would be spammed, not just the ones subsequently processed by aweber? Similarly you seem to suggest that the aweber user might have been hacked - so just them, and all simultaneously? That's using an even more unlikely but unprovable argument to disprove one that although unprovable now seems to have such a weight of evidence to be unavoidable?
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  • Profile picture of the author Midas3 Consulting
    Nasty stuff, guys at Aweber must he having kittens, unsure how they can do much in the way of damage limitation on this one.

    I wondered how my list testing emails where getting spam to them when it's from my own list and own Aweber account.

    I wonder when they are going to go public with the apology etc.

    I guess if nothing else we are going to see one insane improvement in their security review.
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  • Profile picture of the author x3xsolxdierx3x
    Originally Posted by RobJones View Post

    First of all, please note:
    This is *NOT* an assumption. I got PROOF.
    Aweber servers must have been HACKED.

    I'm getting lots of SPAM emails with subjects like
    "Pharmacy Best OFfer!!!" and "Best Love love Pill!!!" etc. etc.

    The content of those emails is an image (with a link).
    But since in my email system the image display is switched off by default I can't view those images (and don't want to switch them on) but it's pretty obvious what kind of emails that must be.
    And they come in in batches. All with identical subjects and very similar or identical links.

    First I thought it was just one marketer whose server got hacked.
    But then I checked the other emails and because of the unique anti-spam system that I have I can tell exactly what's going on.

    In other words, I can prove: It's not just some marketer.
    The issue is:
    I'm getting those spam emails to *ALL* email addresses that I used when opting in to various marketers who use Aweber.
    And ONLY those of my emails are affected that I used to opt in to marketers who use Aweber.

    So, dear Aweber, thank you soo much for exposing all my emails addresses to spammers!
    Good job!

    Honestly, personally I don't use Aweber's system as a customer.
    But if I were I'd sue the hell out of them.

    You can't tell me that this sort of this "could happen to everyone" or something like that.
    It is their first and foremost responsibility to ENSURE that this kind of thing cannot happen.
    And if they let it happen like in this case then they are fully responsible for that.

    Wow...I just read a blog post yesterday about a genetleman who said that the most elite in IM use Aweber...

    I'm glad I came across this post...

    Would anyone here still recommend using them?
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    • Profile picture of the author Midas3 Consulting
      Originally Posted by x3xsolxdierx3x View Post


      Would anyone here still recommend using them?
      I've had some complaints from users, but not enough at this point to consider my options, this is a monumentally bad stroke for Aweber, and at this point it's hard to determine the fallout, but overall they have been a solid provider and I've had no major issues with them.

      The problem is that the damage has already been done, the e-mail addresses of people who in good faith signed up to our lists are now in the hands of spammers.

      I guess we will see how Aweber handle this mess , and what we given in the way of guarantees that their security will be improved to ensure we don't end up in this situation again.
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      • Profile picture of the author ArtiGal
        Wow...this is not good. I've had the same thing happening over the past 24 hours or so. Anyone know if this has happened to other providers, besides Aweber? Could anyone suggest a viable alternative?

        Thanks for any input.
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  • Profile picture of the author ebleu
    I was getting this kind of mail, and I didn't realize where they were coming from. It were in Spam Folder, so, eventually went unnoticed.

    What do you think I should do guys?
    Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author johnpetrov
    same thing here
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  • Profile picture of the author rosetrees
    Originally Posted by RobJones View Post

    Honestly, personally I don't use Aweber's system as a customer.
    But if I were I'd sue the hell out of them.
    That's very "American". Yes, those spam emails are seriously annoying, but they don't do you any harm. Unless, of course, you've bought those products and found that they aren't what they claim
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  • Profile picture of the author Karan Goel
    Well, I do not think that this is just aweber.
    I do not use aweber, still I get such mails
    daily. They are all adult.

    Their emails are like montey3[@]yahoo[.]com

    I have warned them, and added some spice
    to it by "calling my lawyers".
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