Perkonomics - What MORE can you offer your clients?

by Jillian Slack 4 replies
Here's an interesting article on "perkonomics."

DEFINITION

Perkonomics: A new breed of perks and privileges, added to brands' regular offerings, is satisfying consumers’ ever-growing desire for novel forms of status and/or convenience, across all industries. The benefits for brands are equally promising: from escaping commoditization, to showing empathy in turbulent times. One to have firmly on your radar in 2009.

Examples of perkonomics include "airlines, hotels, credit card companies and private banks, who have always been big on all kinds of loyalty programs and privileges. From priority lines to 'no middle seat' guarantees, and from upgrades to discounts on flights, holidays and concerts."

It really made me stop and think about what I could do to take things to the next level. We took advantage of the Fast Pass option at Disney World and I never thought about what was behind it (of course, it was before I learned a lot of stuff from gurus and this forum).

Here are 3 nifty ways to view the whole Perkonomics article:

1. I've saved the article using SnagIt. To view, double click on the image and it should expand and be big enough for you to read.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b7...erkonomics.jpg


2. Direct link to a PDF of the article:

http://www.trendwatching.com/trends/...erkonomics.pdf


3. Link to the article on its web site:

trendwatching.com: PERKONOMICS
#main internet marketing discussion forum #clients #offer #perkonomics
Avatar of Unregistered
  • Profile picture of the author Chris Lockwood
    It's pretty funny that airlines are on the list, considering the "perks" you get, like all the junk fees for bringing luggage, their horrible on-time record, and so on.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[143555].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Chris Lockwood View Post

      It's pretty funny that airlines are on the list, considering the "perks" you get, like all the junk fees for bringing luggage, their horrible on-time record, and so on.
      I agree with you on the airlines. They've gone from a pleasurable experience with high levels of service to an industry that handles human freight.

      Within my own little network of friends, family and acquaintances, the only airline that even comes close to living up to its billing is Virgin. My folks flew Virgin to Europe this summer, and actually enjoyed the experience.

      On the other hand, I could fill pages with horror stories just from within my own circle. But I won't because it would throw this off-topic and I want to see what others have to say.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[143900].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Jillian Slack
    Hey John, would any of those horror stories be turned into perkonomics if you were to do the opposite of whatever went wrong?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[143926].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Jillian Slack View Post

      Hey John, would any of those horror stories be turned into perkonomics if you were to do the opposite of whatever went wrong?
      Jillian, most of the horror stories I've collected fall under this quote from the article:

      So… If you deliver two major benefits that your customers clearly crave—status and convenience—what’s in it for you, as a business professional or as a brand?

      What the airlines did was take away both. From condescending or apathetic gate agents to unexplained delays to just plain old lousy service, Most of our recent airline experiences have been more like anti-perkonomic.

      Maybe special runs where the planes take off and land when the schedule says they will. With special counters where you actually get cordial service, rather than the barely correct politeness that gate agents and snooty headwaiters have turned into an insulting art form.

      And once you get on the plane, you get a seat designed for a human being rather than cramming into a high-flying cattle car. And service people are more than glorified ballpark hot dog vendors.

      As the article stated, taking away something that was once available to all and reserving it for a select few is not much of a perk.

      As you might guess, I'm not a big fan of the airline industry right now...
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[144015].message }}
Avatar of Unregistered

Trending Topics