Good Microphone For Recording Videos With Camtasia?

22 replies
Hi everyone,

Does anyone know a good microphone for to use
when recording online videos with Camtasia?

I started a video today but it was so quiet that
you could barely hear it when I played it back so
I need to fix this issue before I can continue.

Any tips you may have then let me know please.

Thanks

Craig
#camtasia #good #microphone #recording #videos
  • Profile picture of the author Kelly Verge
    I love my Plantronics DSP 500, but it looks is if it might be discontinued - Here's a newer modelHere's a newer model
    The quality is great for the price, plus for me USB is a benefit.
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    • Profile picture of the author Craig Dawber
      Originally Posted by Kelly Verge View Post

      I love my Plantronics DSP 500, but it looks is if it might be discontinued - Here's a newer model

      The quality is great for the price, plus for me USB is a benefit.
      Thanks for replying but from reading the reviews it seems that the Plantronics 655 is Too sensitive and picks up alot of background noises so this would be any good as I'm going to be recording training videos.

      Thanks anyway

      Craig
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  • Profile picture of the author Gary Rambo
    I use the MXL 006 for recording all my audios. It's not inexpensive but does a great job. You'll definitely want to invest in a pop filter to go with it for the best results.

    If the audio is low it may just be your settings so double check that before you buy another microphone.

    Gary
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  • Profile picture of the author Heidi White
    You've probably already done this....

    Check your settings in the Control Panel (Sound) to make sure volume is all the way up.
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    • Profile picture of the author Craig Dawber
      Originally Posted by MostlyHarmless View Post

      You've probably already done this....

      Check your settings in the Control Panel (Sound) to make sure volume is all the way up.
      Yeah I have checked my volume settings.

      Thanks anyway

      Craig
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  • Profile picture of the author Fernando Veloso
    Hey Craig, I use my $9.99 MITSAI headset and it's great.

    I also use the Audio settings in Camtasia to clear voice, add volume, and remove noises.



    Here's what it sounds like: http://www.youtube.com/user/VelosoFernando
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    People make good money selling to the rich. But the rich got rich selling to the masses.
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  • Profile picture of the author Chris Thompson
    I think a simple USB mic of any kind will do you well. I use a Snowball. Less than $100. For Camtasia I might get something that clips to my shirt ... can't remember what those are called, but easier to keep the mic in range when moving around at all.
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    • Profile picture of the author garyfromdurham
      On recommendation I just purchased a Pro Tools Vocal pack which comes with a high quality audio producer microphone.

      It wasn't too expensive.

      I am testing it tonight so will let you know how I get on with it and if it is worthy of my recommedation

      Gary
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  • Profile picture of the author faceit
    I got this USB mic off a recommendation fro Ryan Deiss.
    It works great! I have 2 of them and have never had a problem...

    USB-Mic Podcasting Kit
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  • Profile picture of the author Dr Dan
    I 2nd the snowball but I use the blue snowflake which works awesome. Much better quality than any headset will give you. I think its only 59 bucks on amazon.
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    • Profile picture of the author SuiteJ
      Originally Posted by rockstarinlife View Post

      I 2nd the snowball but I use the blue snowflake which works awesome. Much better quality than any headset will give you. I think its only 59 bucks on amazon.
      I was thinking about trying out a Snowball mic because so many people mention it. But, I currently use a Boss Digital Recorder - The Micro BR, because my I already have it. It works really well, but I think I'll eventually get a stand alone mic at some point.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kelly Verge
        Originally Posted by SuiteJ View Post

        Is there a "Blue" version of the Snowball that is better quality? If yes, is that the one you use?

        I was thinking about trying out a Snowball mic because so many people mention it. But, I currently use a Boss Digital Recorder - The Micro BR, because my I already hav it. It works really well, but I think I'll eventually get a stand alone mic at some point.
        A step up from Blue's Snowball is their Yeti...
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      • Profile picture of the author Dr Dan
        Originally Posted by SuiteJ View Post

        I was thinking about trying out a Snowball mic because so many people mention it. But, I currently use a Boss Digital Recorder - The Micro BR, because my I already have it. It works really well, but I think I'll eventually get a stand alone mic at some point.
        I usually prop the blue snowflake mic on top of a cd spindle so its close to my face when I do a recording. But yes you do need to be close to it or you will get different levels if you move around. The other option I use is a giant squid lapel mic I got for 20 that works great. But I use a usb adapter since my mac doesnt have a powered mic line in. But that works good too. But for top audio quality I use the blue snowflake. I also have a $100 m-audio and $300 rhode nt3 mic, but I still prefer the ease of use with the blue snowflake.
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        • Profile picture of the author Craig Dawber
          Hey warriors,

          Thanks for the great response to this, you've all been a great help.

          Just to let you all know that I've decided to go for the option below as it seems to be proven with Camtasia recording as and they do Camtasia training workshops as well which is a good sign :-)

          BlueOrange Consulting Ltd: Webcam and Lapel Microphone, Commercial - Camtasia Studio

          Thanks again

          I will let you know what I think when it arrives and I've tested it out.

          Craig
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          • Profile picture of the author Lance K
            Check out the AT 2020 by Audio-Technica.
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  • Profile picture of the author Loren Woirhaye
    The good thing about a headset is your volume output won't change
    if you move around in your chair or turn your head. With a mic that
    isn't attached to your body you have to keep a pretty consistent
    distance between your mouth and the mic if you speak relatively
    softly.

    With a non headset mic you can also put it several feet away and
    speak louder than normal.

    Believe me, you don't want to go into your audio files and find
    your voice level is all over the place. The editing involved to
    make it all sound good and even is work you could avoid by
    recording your original signal at a consistent volume in the first
    place.
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    • Profile picture of the author Jason Moffatt
      I've always used a Logitech USB headset mic and it's been fine.
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      • Profile picture of the author jdjenkins
        I suggest having a look at the headsets that Skype sell. It's good to have a mic that's close to, but not directly in front of your mouth, so you reduce any "wind blasting" effects. A clip mic on the shirt can be good, but will pick up more background noise and echo from the room, as well as rustling from the shirt (depending on the fabric) when you move. A mic on a stand can be an option - some models are designed to be used very close up, and some further away; while others are designed to reject sounds which are to the side or begind the mic. Sorry, I'm going on a bit, but I work in audio as my day job!!

        best wishes,

        Jon.
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  • Profile picture of the author JayXtreme
    Snowball/Yeti

    Both are cool bits of kit and will give you great audio...

    Peace

    Jay
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    Bare Murkage.........

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  • Profile picture of the author Loren Woirhaye
    If you are running a mic into a small (non usb) jack on a
    computer, you may need to use a mic with a battery (preamp)
    in it. The advantage of such mics is they can also be plugged
    into video cameras, which require a preamped mic to catch
    an adequate signal.

    USB mics don't usually require a preamp since they are powered
    by the USB port, however latency can be an issue (though
    if your computer is reasonably new or older and fast it
    shouldn't be a problem). Latency causes a delay when monitoring
    through headphones, which is no big deal for speaking, but
    it can also sometimes result in pops, crackles, and drop-outs
    (which suck) and ruin your recording.

    The truth is if no mic will do everything you'll eventually want
    to do well. I'd recommend a headset mic, either USB or
    mini-plug style if you just want to sound consistent and
    aren't worried about making your voice sound like Barry
    White. Sometimes cheap mics (or poor settings) will make
    the speaker sound reedy or like he or she has a speech
    impediment (lisp). I used to think some internet marketers
    were computer nerds with speech problems until I learned
    how easy it to sound bad if you don't set things up right.

    Your voice tonality does matter - if you're a man
    marketing in the West I think you should watch your
    tonality and try to speak at the lower end of your
    range. With a better signal you have better raw material
    to work with for any post-recording processing, which
    sounds intimidating, but even Audacity (opensource)
    has some cool effects which can make your voice
    sound better.

    A mic with a pop filter (foam hat) can be a good idea.
    Even still, I try to remember to pronounce my p's almost
    like b's to avoid popping.
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  • Profile picture of the author williamrs
    I was having problems with my audio too. Then I purchased another (expensive) microphone and nothing changed!

    Fortunately, I found out a solution for my problem. Just record the video, don't care about the audio. Then, you are done, edit your video, increase the volume (it's always necessary for me) and click on (top menu) 'edit'/'audio enhancements'. There is an option called "Bacjground Noise Removal". Set it yo manually, slect your whole video in the timeline and click "Remove Noise". Your audio will be perfect

    It solved my problem, hope it helps you too


    William
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  • Profile picture of the author flobaby
    One other thing that can cause low volume: If it's a USB mic, it's the "wave" slider on your audio panel that's affected, not the "microphone" slider. That can confuse people since you'd assume lifting the mic volume would do it.
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