"How the heck do I find a good domain name?"

36 replies
I've been getting a lot of questions about this in my inbox, so I thought I'd share my surprisingly simple system for finding great domains...


First, search for your keywords. My domains always come from my main keyword list, because it's key to have a keyword-rich domain name. What kind of keywords do I like? Good question...


I tend to like long-tail keywords, for a couple of reasons:
  • Competition strength is usually lower.
  • I'm more apt to find an available .com domain.
Here's how I do keyword research:


I open up three tabs in my browser. In the first, I'll open up Google Adwords Keyword Tool. In the second, I'll open up Google to search. And in the third, I'll open up my domain registrar (I use Dynadot.)


I look up my main niche in the Keyword Tool, on EXACT. Usually I'll only start with a two or three word phrase. I scroll down to the keywords that are getting 800-5000 searches monthly, and click "add exact" next to the ones I like. Then in the left hand column under "Selected Keywords", I'll scroll down to the bottom of the column and click on "Get more related keywords". I'll keep doing this - adding keywords and clicking "Get more related keywords" - until I have a list of over 20 keywords to work with.


I download this into a spreadsheet by clicking on the bottom of the column where it says "Download these keywords." I keep this spreadsheet open.


I'm done with the keyword tool now, so I can close that window.


Next I'll go over to the Google tab. Going down the list, I'll check each keyword phrase's competition strength by doing a search for it in Google. I don't search in quotes, but many do. I find that I can gauge my competition just fine without searching in quotes, but your mileage may vary.


What I am looking at is the first page results' PR and backlinks. That's it. I don't look at how MANY competing pages are indexed. Again, lots of marketers DO look at this. This is just my system. Test and make your own decision.


I fire up SEO for Firefox to check the PR and backlinks of each of the sites on the first page - the first ten results. If I find that the keyword phrase has a PR of 4 or less and backlinks numbering 5000 or less, that particular phrase is in the running for becoming my domain. After I've gone through the entire list and have separated the lower competition phrases out, I take a look to see if there are a few that would be particularly suited to be the site name.


I then go to my domain registrar and look each one up. I'm looking for either a .com, .net or .org. Using long-tail phrases, I can usually find one that will work well. If, by chance, all of the .coms, .nets and .orgs are taken, it's no big deal! I simply add a generic word to the end of the phrase like "info", "guide" or "tips".


As an example, say I really wanted planawedding as my domain, but all three domain extensions were taken. I simply add "info" to the end to make it planaweddinginfo and voila! All three extensions are available! I could also add "tips" or "guide"...between those three, there has always been a .com available for me to buy.


Now remember, just because you used a generic word at the end of your keyword phrase doesn't mean you have to use that in your site header to represent the site's title. Using the example above, I'd have the site name on the header simply read "Plan A Wedding", "How To Plan A Wedding", or some other combination of words, always remembering to have my exact main keyword phrase in the title somewhere.


That's it - that's how I find winning domains every time! It's relatively simple compared to some of the techniques I've read about, but it works for me. Hope this helps some of you!
  • Profile picture of the author RossWebMedia
    Thanks for the advice, Great stuff!
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    • Profile picture of the author Palusko
      All truly good domain names are taken and typically cost a lot of money. Great domain name is a name, that can be simply typed in the browser. Such as toys.com, business.com etc. In other words, those are the domains, that user types in the browser and knows what he is going to get. This type-in traffic can be sometimes bigger than traffic coming from search engines. That is the only advantage of great domain vs not so good one. Still, when it comes to SEO, there is hardly any difference at all. That goes also to .com extension. People prefer it (and I do too), because it is the most common one, but it does not really matter for SEO. I like the research you do, that's something that has to be done for picking up the right keywords, but I personally would not go through all that trouble to pick a domain name. As long as the domain name refers to what the site is all about, and is fairly memorable, that's fine for me. It does not even has to have the keyword in it. Then, all my efforts go to SEO, of course.
      Here's a link to a good article about the subject
      smallbusinessnewz.com/expertarticles/2008/06/13/domain-name-keyword-importance]Domain Name Keyword Importance | SmallBusinessNewz
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      • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
        Originally Posted by Palusko View Post

        Great domain name is a name, that can be simply typed in the browser.
        Who does that? Seriously, do you type a lot of domain names? Nobody wants to type domain names.
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        • Profile picture of the author Lisa Gergets
          Originally Posted by Kevin Riley View Post

          HINT: The best place to find good domain names is at the pawn shop. Especially, go in the week before payday. Some folks will pawn some really good domain names when they're feeling the money pinch.

          I also found some good domain names at a flea market once. They were in a box with some old bottle caps. The kid was selling the whole lot for $5. I don't think he knew what he had there.
          Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

          Who does that? Seriously, do you type a lot of domain names? Nobody wants to type domain names.
          I SO totally deserve this...I finally post something in a serious tone, and something of value, and you guys derail it. Touche! Maybe instead of "Official WF Babe", my designation should be "Official WF Threadjacker"...

          Good stuff guys!
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        • Profile picture of the author Palusko
          Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

          Who does that? Seriously, do you type a lot of domain names? Nobody wants to type domain names.
          Probably not too many people. Yet it is one of the main factors that determines the quality (and price) of the domain name. One word domain names are still considered to be the most priced ones. On what bases and how much of it is just artificially created hype is a different topic. But I certainly wish I owned one such domain.
          To me, for my purposes, the top priority for selection of a domain name is to make sense, be as short as possible and easy to memorize. Other things I consider is the extension and I try not to use hyphens (it is part of 'easy to memorize'). If it contains my keyword, that to me is an added bonus as I think it will make it a bit easier to brand, but I do not think it will make it any easier to rank on search engines.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Bard
    Lisa, I'm impressed. No, not with the information but that you could string together that many cohesive paragraphs in one post

    Seriously, that is very helpful to not only newbies but some veterans too.

    Thank you

    Matt
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    • Profile picture of the author Lisa Gergets
      Originally Posted by Matt M View Post

      Lisa, I'm impressed. No, not with the information but that you could string together that many cohesive paragraphs in one post

      Seriously, that is very helpful to not only newbies but some veterans too.

      Thank you

      Matt
      Man, you're lucky you redeemed yourself.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sparhawke
    I don't have a huge portfolio of names but this is almost exactly what I do to find my names too, actual and future potential...you just made my job a lot harder, Lisa...You're Fired!
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  • Profile picture of the author Lisa Gergets
    All truly good domain names are taken and typically cost a lot of money. Great domain name is a name, that can be simply typed in the browser. Such as toys.com, business.com etc. In other words, those are the domains, that user types in the browser and knows what he is going to get.
    This is untrue and incorrect on so many levels. Any person looking up "toys" is absolutely NOT going to know what he's going to get. Kids toys? Dog toys? Sex toys? The domain "toys.com" is also not a good domain for internet marketing. It's not nearly targeted enough.
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    • Profile picture of the author Palusko
      Originally Posted by Lisa Gergets View Post

      This is untrue and incorrect on so many levels. Any person looking up "toys" is absolutely NOT going to know what he's going to get. Kids toys? Dog toys? Sex toys? The domain "toys.com" is also not a good domain for internet marketing. It's not nearly targeted enough.
      That's true, these kind of domain names are not good for internet marketing. But they are most definitely the ones that get the most type-in trafic. And of course, cost the most. But when it comes to internet marketing, you really do not need your keyword in the domain name to make it rank and get good SERPs. That's done through different means. After all, even when you type "toys" in Google, toys.com is nowhere to be found on the first page. But for example WalMart, FisherPrice or Lego is..... Having your keyword in the domain name makes it easier to memorize and identify, but it is not necessary for SEO.
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      • Profile picture of the author Lisa Gergets
        Originally Posted by Palusko View Post

        But when it comes to internet marketing, you really do not need your keyword in the domain name to make it rank and get good SERPs. That's done through different means.
        You're absolutely right...it is not necessary to have your keyword phrase in your domain to rank (as would be the case with a branded domain, but that's a completely different post...) But it is easier to rank for that particular keyword phrase if you do. This is why I try to find the keyword phrase with the highest search numbers and least amount of competition to use as the domain.
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  • Profile picture of the author Skyrider
    Hi Lisa,

    I'm going to show my newbieness with my points and questions. Sorry, gotta learn somewhere, eh?


    Originally Posted by Lisa Gergets View Post

    I've been getting a lot of questions about this in my inbox, so I thought I'd share my surprisingly simple system for finding great domains...


    First, search for your keywords. My domains always come from my main keyword list, because it's key to have a keyword-rich domain name. What kind of keywords do I like? Good question...


    I tend to like long-tail keywords, for a couple of reasons:
    • Competition strength is usually lower.
    • I'm more apt to find an available .com domain.

    Can you give an example as to what long-tail keywords are?


    Here's how I do keyword research:


    I open up three tabs in my browser. In the first, I'll open up Google Adwords Keyword Tool. In the second, I'll open up Google to search. And in the third, I'll open up my domain registrar (I use Dynadot.)

    I look up my main niche in the Keyword Tool, on EXACT. Usually I'll only start with a two or three word phrase. I scroll down to the keywords that are getting 800-5000 searches monthly, and click "add exact" next to the ones I like. Then in the left hand column under "Selected Keywords", I'll scroll down to the bottom of the column and click on "Get more related keywords". I'll keep doing this - adding keywords and clicking "Get more related keywords" - until I have a list of over 20 keywords to work with.


    I download this into a spreadsheet by clicking on the bottom of the column where it says "Download these keywords." I keep this spreadsheet open.


    I'm done with the keyword tool now, so I can close that window.


    Next I'll go over to the Google tab. Going down the list, I'll check each keyword phrase's competition strength by doing a search for it in Google. I don't search in quotes, but many do. I find that I can gauge my competition just fine without searching in quotes, but your mileage may vary.
    I wish I knew what you meant by "keyword phrase." AND what is the meaning of the "PR" you use next? Can you also tell what "backlinks" are?

    What I am looking at is the first page results' PR and backlinks. That's it. I don't look at how MANY competing pages are indexed. Again, lots of marketers DO look at this. This is just my system. Test and make your own decision.
    What is SEO for Firefox. Believe it or not I know what SEO means = Search Engine Optimization. Where are you seeing these PR's, backlinks and these numbers? Again, I'm not understanding "phrase."
    I fire up SEO for Firefox to check the PR and backlinks of each of the sites on the first page - the first ten results. If I find that the keyword phrase has a PR of 4 or less and backlinks numbering 5000 or less, that particular phrase is in the running for becoming my domain. After I've gone through the entire list and have separated the lower competition phrases out, I take a look to see if there are a few that would be particularly suited to be the site name.


    I then go to my domain registrar and look each one up. I'm looking for either a .com, .net or .org. Using long-tail phrases, I can usually find one that will work well. If, by chance, all of the .coms, .nets and .orgs are taken, it's no big deal! I simply add a generic word to the end of the phrase like "info", "guide" or "tips".
    Is there something wrong with .info? Does a .com get better recognition?

    As an example, say I really wanted planawedding as my domain, but all three domain extensions were taken. I simply add "info" to the end to make it planaweddinginfo and voila! All three extensions are available! I could also add "tips" or "guide"...between those three, there has always been a .com available for me to buy.


    Now remember, just because you used a generic word at the end of your keyword phrase doesn't mean you have to use that in your site header to represent the site's title. Using the example above, I'd have the site name on the header simply read "Plan A Wedding", "How To Plan A Wedding", or some other combination of words, always remembering to have my exact main keyword phrase in the title somewhere.


    That's it - that's how I find winning domains every time! It's relatively simple compared to some of the techniques I've read about, but it works for me. Hope this helps some of you!
    Hope I don't have you pulling your hair out.

    Thanks, much!

    ~Sky
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    • Profile picture of the author Skyrider
      One more thing. How does one give a "thanks?"

      Thanks!!

      ~Sky
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    • Profile picture of the author Lisa Gergets
      Hey there Sky - sorry I'm just now seeing this reply, but here are your answers as I see them.

      Can you give an example as to what long-tail keywords are? / I wish I knew what you meant by "keyword phrase."
      By example:
      Niche = weddings
      Keyword phrase = summer weddings, wedding planners, winter wedding decorations
      Long-tail keywords are keyword phrases containing 3, 4, 5 different words. These are much more targeted. Long tail keyword phrases = summer weddings in Aruba, winter wedding flower centerpieces, cheap wedding planners in Chicago, etc.

      AND what is the meaning of the "PR" you use next? PR stands for Page Rank, and is a measure of strength and popularity of that site as compared to others, in the eyes of Google. I'm probably not explaining it sufficiently, so here's a better explanation: PageRank - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      Can you also tell what "backlinks" are? Backlinks are links back to your site from other places on the net.

      What is SEO for Firefox / Where are you seeing these PR's, backlinks and these numbers? If you're using Firefox as your browser, SEO for Firefox is a plugin that can be activated and when it is, the PR and number of backlinks will show up after the results of a Google search. I've attached a screenshot so you can see what I'm talking about. After the rank number of the site, it says PR and then a dash or a number. That is the sites PR per Google. After that, you see "Y! Pagelinks" and that is how many other links there are out there on the net that point back to your site. There's other info that SEO for Firefox delivers as well, but I don't use it.

      Is there something wrong with .info? Does a .com get better recognition? Yes, a .com does get better recognition, in my opinion, and so do .net and .org. (Opinions on this vary WIDELY.) Personally, if I can't get the exact phrase I'm looking for in a .com, .net or .org (with or without adding a word to the end), I'll move on to another phrase rather than go for the .info.

      Hope I don't have you pulling your hair out. Absolutely not! I get these types of questions in my inbox every day and that's why I decided to post here!

      Hope this helps you!

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    • Profile picture of the author Kevin Riley
      HINT: The best place to find good domain names is at the pawn shop. Especially, go in the week before payday. Some folks will pawn some really good domain names when they're feeling the money pinch.

      I also found some good domain names at a flea market once. They were in a box with some old bottle caps. The kid was selling the whole lot for $5. I don't think he knew what he had there.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kat Bartone
        Sky:

        One more thing. How does one give a "thanks?"
        At the bottom right of each post there are several buttons (quote, multiquote and others) including a 'Thanks' button - but if memory serves me correctly, you have to have a certain number of posts on the forum before that button becomes visible - not sure how many, but it will appear for you at some point.

        Cheers,

        Kat
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  • Profile picture of the author robertvance
    Lisa
    Thank you for that very detailed explanation of how to find a good domain based on keyword research. It was very Helpful. I especially liked the part about words that you can add ti the end of the domain to get a domain with the keywords you want. It is really a great reminder that you do not need to use that extra word in you website title.

    Thnaks
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  • Profile picture of the author jbl33
    Thanks for all the great ideas. One of the sites I love for quickly finding domain names is bustaname.com.

    However, few weeks ago, I discovered an even better way squadhelp.com. I started a domain name contest for $35 and received 150+ domain name suggestions in 3 days. I am seeing some contests are now receiving more than 400 suggestions. Worth a try if you are serious about finding good domain names.
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  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
    Giving away all my secrets, eh Gergets? Seriously, great post. Your method is about 95% of what I do, right down to using Dynadot. Well, I actually use 000domains because I like their bulk search feature better, but then go to Dynadot to buy. I do have some domains registered with 000 too, so they shouldn't complain I'm using them.

    Another thing you can do instead of adding "info" or "guide" to the end of a keyword that is taken is to add an "i" with a hyphen before the keyword when it makes sense. It works in the search engines pretty much like a single keyword domain. For example, i-webmaster.com and i-webhost.com are perfectly good domain names.
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    • Profile picture of the author Lisa Gergets
      Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

      Giving away all my secrets, eh Gergets? Seriously, great post. Your method is about 95% of what I do, right down to using Dynadot. Well, I actually use 000domains because I like their bulk search feature better, but then go to Dynadot to buy. I do have some domains registered with 000 too, so they shouldn't complain I'm using them.

      Another thing you can do instead of adding "info" or "guide" to the end of a keyword that is taken is to add an "i" with a hyphen before the keyword when it makes sense. It works in the search engines pretty much like a single keyword domain. For example, i-webmaster.com and i-webhost.com are perfectly good domain names.
      Bwah ha haaaaa...no secret is safe with me!

      Know what I love about Dynadot? The grace period...when I was new to this, I can't tell you how many times I thought I had a great domain, bought it, THEN did the research and ended up using that grace period! LOL
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      • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
        Originally Posted by Lisa Gergets View Post

        Bwah ha haaaaa...no secret is safe with me!

        Know what I love about Dynadot? The grace period...when I was new to this, I can't tell you how many times I thought I had a great domain, bought it, THEN did the research and ended up using that grace period! LOL
        Grace period? I'd like to say you should explain the grace period for the newbies...but the truth is, even though I've used Dynadot for years, I don't know anything about it. I guess I should look around more the next time I log in. Until then...

        ...'splain yourself, Lucy! (for the newbies, of course. )
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        • Profile picture of the author Lisa Gergets
          Originally Posted by Dennis Gaskill View Post

          Grace period? I'd like to say you should explain the grace period for the newbies...but the truth is, even though I've used Dynadot for years, I don't know anything about it. I guess I should look around more the next time I log in. Until then...

          ...'splain yourself, Lucy! (for the newbies, of course. )
          Silly! With Dynadot, you have a grace period of so many hours...120 maybe?...within that time, you can "return" your domain name for a credit. Here's the info from Dynadot directly: Grace Deletions - Dynadot.com
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          • Profile picture of the author Hanz
            Bookmarked thread. Good solid information. Thanks
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          • Profile picture of the author Dennis Gaskill
            Originally Posted by Lisa Gergets View Post

            Silly! With Dynadot, you have a grace period of so many hours...120 maybe?...within that time, you can "return" your domain name for a credit. Here's the info from Dynadot directly: Grace Deletions - Dynadot.com
            Well I'll be dipped. Butterflied and batter fried to a toasty golden brown. I've never changed my mind on a domain name I bought - not within that time frame anyway - but it's nice to know. Thanks, Lisa. Never too old to learn a new trick.
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  • Profile picture of the author Raj Riyat
    As a beginner in IM this is exactly the kind of thread I was looking for.

    My question is, how does hyphenating a domain name affect SEO etc.

    For example, is it better to pick 'howtoeatporcupinesinfo.com'
    or 'how-to-eat-porcupines.com'
    or 'howtoeatporcupines.org'

    I tend to spend an innordinate amount of time trying to find the perfect domain name
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    • Profile picture of the author Lisa Gergets
      Originally Posted by Raj Riyat View Post

      As a beginner in IM this is exactly the kind of thread I was looking for.

      My question is, how does hyphenating a domain name affect SEO etc.

      For example, is it better to pick 'howtoeatporcupinesinfo.com'
      or 'how-to-eat-porcupines.com'
      or 'howtoeatporcupines.org'

      I tend to spend an innordinate amount of time trying to find the perfect domain name
      Yummmm, porcupine. :p

      Again, dashes are something where the opinions vary. I tend to stay away from them, but I have had sites rank well with dashes. Before I began using a word at the end of the keyword phrase, I used dashes instead to get .coms, and I've had both successes and failures with both.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lisa Gergets
    I'd do it in this order:
    1. howtoeatporcupinesinfo.com
    2. howtoeatporcupines.org
    3. how-to-eat-porcupines.com

    Next time, use an easier word to type, eh?
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    • Profile picture of the author Andie
      Originally Posted by Lisa Gergets View Post

      I'd do it in this order:
      1. howtoeatporcupinesinfo.com
      2. howtoeatporcupines.org
      3. how-to-eat-porcupines.com

      Next time, use an easier word to type, eh?

      gee...y'all are makin' me hungry
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  • Profile picture of the author jonnoryan
    Some excellent advise there Lisa !


    Here is a great tip I use for my keyword research


    Sometimes Google's keyword tool can be unreliable with its data.


    Picture this scenario


    You have spent money on your domain, developed your website/blog etc. spent time and money on backlinks, worked hard to get to the top of Google, only to realise that your keyword is getting no traffic !


    Here is how to overcome this


    After you have found a potentially good keyword phrase with the keyword tool, create a simple campaign with adwords using your keyword phrase with the exact match in the adwords set up. Don't make the ad too attractive. You want as little clicks as possible on it. Use an authority site in the ad campaign. This will increase your quality score, so if you do get the odd click you won't be charged a fortune. Run this ad campaign for a few days. This will give you a very accurate assessment of how many daily searches the keyword phrase is getting


    Then armed with this information, you can make a very informed decision on the value of this keyword phrase.


    As the saying goes, 'it is better to measure twice and cut once'
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  • Profile picture of the author ConversionTime
    Really usefull thanks! Cant wait to try it out but curretly having one of those why not think of something like this before now moments
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  • Profile picture of the author prajwalnshinde
    Banned
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    • Profile picture of the author Lisa Gergets
      Originally Posted by prajwalnshinde View Post

      first of all you can do the keyword research using this website freekeywords.wordtracker.com which will give you important keywords and their popularity on the internet. based on this note down about 15-20 keywords and select the good one out of it for your business and register the domain name with it. will soon be posting a video on this
      Well...yeah...yup...basically that's exactly what I said to do, but with Adwords Keyword Tool.

      You're totally welcome to promo your upcoming video on this thread though...please, feel free! LOL
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  • Profile picture of the author krishnaxz
    many many thanks to list. I found very suitable answer here. Because this will help me to buy a domain. I use some tricks that you have mention but some tricks I never used.
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  • Profile picture of the author VacuPractor
    I was looking for information from people that used squadhelp.com.

    Learned alot from this thread where squadhelp was mentioned once - but no replys or positive or negative infromation. Welcome thoughts - thanks Paul
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