important lesson learned: Big problem with OVER-delivering (case-study)

6 replies
hey there,

here's the lesson I've learned in action:

When you deliver value -- it's often more valuable if you do not
overdeliver up-front.

Here's the long version (and I'll try to keep it short, as that was my main
lesson learned over the last month or so):

I'm in the process of launching a product, and as I strive to deliver value at
each step, I created TONS of really great video content which moves
people closer to their goal.

The testimonials from those who went through all of the content was
awesome -- and I'm super grateful that it makes a difference.

So: tons of value delivered, all for free, everybody happy, right?

WRONG!

My analytics show me this: less than 5% actually go through the entire lot
(it's a total of a little over 1h of video) -- the rest tune out after on
average 5mins.

Meaning: very little actual value delivered!

So, my lesson is this: no matter how valuable the content, if people do not
consume it, they're not getting value out of it. Mission failed.

May seem obvious -- but I was so 'blinded' by the initial feedback of those
who went through all the way, that I completely 'ignored' those who were
implicitly saying

"hey, this may be valuable, but right now I don't see the value -- and if I
can't see the immediate value, the risk of investing an hour of my precious
time is just too high".

Practical implication of this all: as a result of people 'having' to go
through an hour of video, most people 'forgot' to comment on
the thread where I initially published the content -- it had already
left page 1 by the time they were done consuming the content
(got a lot of 'friend' requests and PMs, but hardly any comments)

Conclusion:

I'll keep providing sexy content, but it'll be micro-wave popcorn sized.
Super-short article, sell the idea of "hey, here is content that'll rock your
world", then send them off

hope this is of help to someone

Cheers

Veit
#big #casestudy #important #learned #lesson #overdelivering #problem
  • Profile picture of the author Najat Engineer
    some people don't expect to get valuable stuff for free

    lots of us pay more attention to the stuff that we paid for, it's wrong but we do it anyway

    thank you so much for sharing this with us
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    • Profile picture of the author edmltw
      Marketing's about leaking valuable information bit by bit so they'll come back for more, and more, and more, and.............

      That's why I love marketing :p

      Ed
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  • Profile picture of the author mahesh2k
    Veit, my observation is that some people can't stand for video content (there are some other issues as well like bandwidth etc) and there are some people who scan text and sometimes you'll find people who don't like reading text-content. So there needs to balance. We can't build content that pleases all type of audience always.
    I like your idea of providing short content that gives results,thanks for sharing.
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    • Profile picture of the author YseUp
      I think your conflating lots of different issues.

      1. You assumed that 1 big video is more valuable than bite sized chunks (You've change your mind about that now).
      2. There is a difference between providing information to people and promising to teach them a skill. Which did you promise? It's not up to you to make people sit through your videos and apply what the info. Unless you promised that's something you would do.
      3. Implicit assumption that video is more valuable than other media. Personally I hate sitting through long winded videos and audios that could have been better explained in a paragraph. 99% of the most life changing information I've received had been in written form, books, e-books, forum posts. Not video or audio.

      As others have said, there are so many free videos out there, why should they watch yours? Unless they are really that much better than those of other people? So maybe chop it up and sell it.
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      • Profile picture of the author VeitSchenk
        yep, the 'lots of different issues' may be the issue.

        just to clarify: the promise is that they'll move forward, however in order to do it, they have to do an exercise, which I share in the video.

        the "problem" for me is this: in order for the exercise to have full effect, i.e. provide maximum value, there has to be a certain amount of background information. (which takes about an hour to deliver)

        now, when I look at it, it's a bit like dating: I know I have awesome stuff to deliver later on, but do not have an hour to make a first impression.

        (which I guess explains why I didn't have that many girlfriends, "hey, let me give you a little background first, so you understand the depth and meaning of my feelings for you. Let's start with the big bang..." (ok, seriously, no pun intended)

        thanks again for the input

        Cheers

        Veit

        PS: I better go and check out Eben's 'double your dating' to see if he's got good tips on courting 'buyers' of free stuff;-)

        Originally Posted by YseUp View Post

        I think your conflating lots of different issues.

        1. You assumed that 1 big video is more valuable than bite sized chunks (You've change your mind about that now).
        2. There is a difference between providing information to people and promising to teach them a skill. Which did you promise? It's not up to you to make people sit through your videos and apply what the info. Unless you promised that's something you would do.
        3. Implicit assumption that video is more valuable than other media. Personally I hate sitting through long winded videos and audios that could have been better explained in a paragraph. 99% of the most life changing information I've received had been in written form, books, e-books, forum posts. Not video or audio.

        As others have said, there are so many free videos out there, why should they watch yours? Unless they are really that much better than those of other people? So maybe chop it up and sell it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rus Sells
    I agree with a couple of the other posters. I feel your on the right track in deciding to chop up your content into smaller more digestible pieces.

    When you do break your content up into smaller pieces don't forget to highlight some of the main points they will benefit from in the next video.

    Many internet users have the microwave mentality, 1 1/2 minutes and its popcorn time. Try cooking popcorn for an hour! I don't think you'd have popcorn after that long!
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