Any video making tips?

22 replies
This weekend I began recording some videos for my site and it took me 3 hours to record two 2 minute videos! What is it about getting in front of a tiny camera that makes me nervous? Does anyone else experience this? This was a nightmare! I did them over and over....and still didn't get them the way I wanted them. I end up sounding either too excited, too calm, or monotonous (or forget what I wanted to say!) I am very passionate about my niche and I want this to show through.

Any tips from seasoned marketers on how to make the video-making process more quick and smooth? How to let my own personality shine through?

Thanks a million!

Robin
#making #tips #video
  • Profile picture of the author badboy_Nick
    All about experience... the more videos you do the more comfortable you'll get.

    When I did my first video I almost peed in my pants but after around 10 or so it was a piece of cake. If you do video blogging or post a new video every week you will become much more natural add it.

    Experience is all it takes.

    Any questions let me know,
    Nick
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  • Profile picture of the author James Dyson
    Like Nick says, just keep doing it - you will only get better.

    I was the same when I started making tutorial videos, I would constantly re-record them or edit them for hours. Now I'm not saying you shouldn't do a little editing to polish your recordings, but the most important thing to do is just get your content out there - you will more than likely be pleasantly suprised with the feedback you get.

    I think we're all often too critical of ourselves, and it's obvious you have passion for your niche so no doubt this will show through in your videos, even if you don't realise it

    ~James Dyson
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  • Profile picture of the author gravtex
    Robin,

    It sounds just like my first experience with making videos. Everything took multiple takes because I'd mess up all the time the second that little red light went on.

    Best way to get through it... practice. Keep making them. You'll get better as you keep making more. The important thing is that you're actually making them - most people are too scared so you're on the right track, just keep at it and it'll seem like old hat in no time.

    Gary
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  • Profile picture of the author MJ Sterling
    You don't have to appear on camera.. doing voice overs is a good alternative, that's how I choose to do most of my stuff because I know where you're coming from.

    I use Camtasia and set up some nice pics or video of stuff I've filmed, talk over (reading a script) and it turns out alright. Not fantastic but it'll do.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
    Hey Robin,

    The easiest way to get results is to just get comfortable and pretend you're saying your words to a good friend and don't over-think things too much.

    It gets easier and some people never have a problem, so just keep going so that you get comfortable more quickly.

    Andy
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  • Profile picture of the author mikemac1
    @Robin - first, if you are very passionate about your niche then just press record and go for it, don't worry about trying to sound a certain way or being perfect.

    Your customers/prospects/etc want to see and hear that passion you have, and that is what is going to make your videos successful.

    A good example that is mentioned a lot is Gary Vaynerchuk and WineLibrary.tv, he is so passionate about his niche, he doesn't worry about sounding a certain way or making mistakes, he just goes for it and look at what it's done for him.

    Videos are like anything else you do online, you just have to put yourself out there and see what happens, see what works, track results and test reactions and you'll find a system that works for you.
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    • Profile picture of the author mrcouchpotato
      As everyone else said, the more practice you have the better you'll get at it.

      But one thing I like to do is break my videos down into smaller segments. That way I don't have to worry about having to do one large take. I feel more comfortable taping five 5 minute segments than one 25 minute segment.

      By breaking your videos into smaller segments, it will make it much easier to edit too. And it will give you time to take a break, breath, and compose your thoughts between shooting each segment.

      Hope that helps.

      Mike
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      • Profile picture of the author infoshot
        Don't sweat the small stuff as they say. Like these guys have said, practice makes perfect.
        I've tried scripts but end up looking like I'm reading a script!
        I think it may be harder for women because we are a little more self-conscious.
        Your passion will show even though you think you are a lousy commentator!
        I am going for coaching to help me because I am too!
        Video is too valuable to not use, so I need to learn how to do it better.
        Keep at it.
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        • Profile picture of the author Marty S
          After a few years, several hundred videos, and nearly 2 million youtube views, the best recommendation I can give you is to record your audio separately and edit it so that it sounds fluid, concise, interesting and passionate. I wrote an article about that very thing here:

          Create your audio file first for your videos. | Video

          If you are on a PC you can use Audacity, and on a Mac garageband is built in and is excellent for doing this.

          Because the medium is video, a lot of producers overlook the element of the audio component, but it is the main cause of viewers dropping off in the first minute of "seeing" your video.

          Audio tips -

          1- Get right to it, skip the intro and how great you think you are for providing this (viewers will be the judge of that) content.

          2- Don't skimp when buying a mic. You wont have to sell a child to buy one, but $100 should do fine.

          3- Write your script and practice saying it a few times - get comfortable with your story

          4- Inject passion by using emphasis in your voice. Do NOT make it sound like you are reading a script.

          5- Don't yell, but talk to your audience they way they talk.

          Hope that helps, and good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jay Jennings
    To expand on Marty's #3, when you write your script, write it the way you talk. For example, you probably wouldn't tell someone, "I am going to the store." You'd say, "I'm going to the store."

    People use contractions in speaking a LOT more than they use them in writing, so be aware of that when you're writing your script.

    A few years ago I was nervous about doing video so I set out to do a 1-minute video every day for 90 days -- and I posted it online. I figured no matter how BAD I was at first, I'd get better if I did it every day.

    After a couple weeks I bagged the idea because I didn't care any more -- it only took that long before I was at ease enough to crank out a video i I needed to.

    So don't wait until you need a video to record one -- record one tonight, and one again tomorrow, and just keep doing that until you realize you don't need to do it any longer.

    Jay Jennings

    PS - One more thing, when you start recording, just keep rolling and do some retakes if you need to. When you're done, just clip out the crap and keep what's good.
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  • Profile picture of the author AdamLCasey
    TIME SAVER:
    If you make a mistake the immediate reaction is to stop the camera rolling and start again from the top.
    However this can really add time on to the process.
    Ignore the impulse to stop the video, instead simply pause momentarily think of the last good place to start off from again and try to remember what tone, pitch and speed your were talking at and the start off from that just before that point again. This will make it a lot easier to get everything down in one take and then simply trim out the mistakes later.

    Remember to be smiling when you first kick off and to hold it for a few seconds. Worst thing is to have the opening frame of your video showing you with a weird mid-yawning like facial expression. lol

    Like everyone else has said at least you've bitten the bullet.
    Keep it up
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  • Profile picture of the author organicgirl6
    Great suggestions from everyone. I truly appreciate it.
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    • Profile picture of the author innocent07
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      Have a simple background, not too distracting, and dont forget to smile in the video.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mohammad Afaq
        Originally Posted by innocent07 View Post

        Have a simple background, not too distracting, and dont forget to smile in the video.
        Yeah you should do that becauese:

        People seldom notice old clothes if you wear a big smile. ~Lee Mildon
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      • Profile picture of the author Zanti
        Hey Marty,

        Thanks for the tip. I just checked out your blog and you have some really good stuff on there. Glad I found it.

        Since I'm a mac and screenflow user I was also happy to see that you are also.

        There was also one post of yours that I really liked, for my own reasons. I won't mention though but I have a feeling you can guess which one it is.

        Thanks,

        Brian
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  • Profile picture of the author Kevin Riley
    Originally Posted by organicgirl6 View Post

    This weekend I began recording some videos for my site and it took me 3 hours to record two 2 minute videos! What is it about getting in front of a tiny camera that makes me nervous? Does anyone else experience this? This was a nightmare! I did them over and over....and still didn't get them the way I wanted them. I end up sounding either too excited, too calm, or monotonous (or forget what I wanted to say!) I am very passionate about my niche and I want this to show through.

    Any tips from seasoned marketers on how to make the video-making process more quick and smooth? How to let my own personality shine through?

    Thanks a million!

    Robin
    If you're winging it without a teleprompter, put main notes on a whiteboard or large sheet of paper, behind your camera. Quick glances at it will cue you, without taking your eyes off the camera too noticeably.

    Also, do some practice runs before turning on the camera.
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    • Profile picture of the author Izesta
      You might also come across more natural if you get a friend to sit with you and have that person interview you.

      This works well for me because I never have to really worry about what I was going to say. After all, it's an interview. If you know your subject, it should be an easier piece of cake.

      Plan it all out with the questions you want to be asked, get your setting together and start recording. No reason why the interviewer can't have their notes right in front of them.

      An interview and more than one person will also keep people's attention longer.

      Have you ever watched The Insider on CBS at 7:30? They have a panel of 4 people for a silly 30 minute gossip show. They said it's because they found people tuned in longer with a variety of co-hosts.

      I agree with MJ Sterling too. It's far easier to use Camtasia to record something visual and you add your voice. This way you don't have to worry about how you look and how you sound. When I mess up my audio recording (a little bit) while recording a program or screen with Camtasia, I am far more okay with that than when I mess up audio while recording my funny looking face.

      I think we're also too hard on ourselves. I see people mess up on videos all the time. Doesn't bother me at all.

      Good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author mywebwork
    I've found that preparing a script and using a teleprompter is a great way to improve my videos.

    There is a free teleprompter that I've been using called Prompt! - you can download it here:

    Free Teleprompter application

    The "Lite" version is free, they also make a commercial version as well. It's very easy to use.

    Bill
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    • Profile picture of the author Izesta
      Originally Posted by mywebwork View Post

      I've found that preparing a script and using a teleprompter is a great way to improve my videos.

      There is a free teleprompter that I've been using called Prompt! - you can download it here:

      Free Teleprompter application

      The "Lite" version is free, they also make a commercial version as well. It's very easy to use.

      Bill

      Thanks for that tip Bill.
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      • Profile picture of the author innocent07
        Banned
        Another tip i would advise would be, be original!

        You have seen how original Kern is with his videos,
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  • Profile picture of the author mpeters7
    Also, don't forget that you can edit your video later!

    One thing that makes it way easier to edit you video later at any point is to have two different shots, so that it doesn't look like you're jumping at every edit point.

    The best way to have two different shots is to use the zoom on your camera. Do your talk as best you can all the way through once from farther away, with about half of your body in the shot. Then, do it a second time with just your shoulders and your head in the shot.

    This lets you easily cut between shots without a weird jump...allowing you to go through your video twice as smoothly as possible, and just cut between shots to get rid of any mistakes.

    They do this in a ton of documentaries to make what people are saying more concise.

    And if you're just using a webcam, you can always move it closer instead of zooming. You can also use screenshots or any other footage as a cutaway to cover your edits.
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  • Profile picture of the author eQuus
    Thanks guys for all the great tips -- especially Jay's about making a video every day.
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