The Purpose of Outrageous Claims

10 replies
I often see people talk about making 5 figures or more a month in a program, and make it sound as if no experience is required. Just set it up and earn money.

I try to understand what the person making the claim must be thinking in their mind, and the best I have come up with is they are purposely try to manipulate people into spending money when they know they chances of success at the level claimed are extremely low.

For me, when I see a claim like this, I just skip the post and move one. But obviously a few fall for it.

Do you ignore most outrageous claims?
Do you worry that people might be manipulated?
#claims #outrageous #purpose
  • Profile picture of the author Mohammad Afaq
    I don't ignore all outrageous claims and I have many times bought courses making those claims because I look at the content and not the claim.

    And I don't get a refund if the product help me or gives me what I was looking for. I don't care if I didn't make what the creator of the product claimed if the product helped me.
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    • Profile picture of the author Daniel Brock
      Simple. Outrageous claims sell products.

      The majority of IM product sales letters attack emotions.

      MAKE A BILLION DOLLARS INSTANTLY
      WITHOUT DOING ANYTHING!
      JUST CLICK A COUPLE BUTTONS AND SPEND THE REST OF THE DAY DOING WHATEVER YOU WANT

      That type of language attracts certain types of people: people who are hopeful and want to improve their life, but don't want to really do anything about it.

      They want to be able to push a couple buttons and have money come to their bank account.

      Who wouldn't?

      Those types of sales letters are geared towards those type of people for a reason.

      Regards,
      Dan
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Barrs
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    • Profile picture of the author dvduval
      Originally Posted by paulbarrs View Post

      Truth is, the 5-figure month isn't all that hard... once you know how... once you have a good list... once you've developed that list... once you've built solid reputation... once JV partners trust you... once your brand or name carries credibility ... once you ... get the picture.
      Exactly, I know lots of people that make 5 figures each month, and they didn't do it by starting with one of these offers. Maybe "somebody" did, but that would be the exception, not the norm.

      I could teach someone to make 5 figures, but they would be challenged for a long while on the way to their goal. Funny how sometimes once people see what is required, they back off because they aren't ready. I certainly wasn't ready for a long while, and I had to learn how to do it. There was nothing too outrageous about it.
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  • Profile picture of the author GameLinx
    I have a friend that does this. Personally, I don't like it, because he could scam someone into spending money for something you can get for free somewhere else.

    Plus, I noticed that most of his forum posts on his own website, only focus on making sales (possible off-topic response), regardless of his members question.
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    • Profile picture of the author butters
      Or, here is a thought and I am guilty of this but not in the claim sense but when I write a product. I forget that I am targeting newbies and what seems really easy to me and I expect them to be able to do it, then I realise, crap, I now have to re write and make it more friendly . I am sure most are just sales pitches and are majorly inflated but just a thought why some might do it :p.
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    • Profile picture of the author andr3w84
      I try not to ignore grandiose claims as they might indeed represent some amazing product.

      On the other hand, we as warriors and ultimately businesspeople, are supposed to have powerful critical eyes and not let ourselves be carried away by words only but be guided by evidence.

      Probably people used to write hype to sell may hate me here, but I never buy anything before thoroughly checking the seller's track record and having inspected the sales page to the pixel, taking into account #views (in case of WSOs) and verifiable testimonials that don't just say "wonderful buy!!! seems great will start reading/watching later".
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  • Profile picture of the author fasteasysuccess
    one key thing alot of people especially in mlm or biz opps do is make the claims of 20k a week however they don't tell you they spent 10-15k to get it.

    It sounds better when they say it that way plus no one would join.

    I turned down a guy last month wanting me to do some marketing for him because he was about telling people something which was bs and he admitted it to me when i called him on it and said who cares.
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    • Profile picture of the author dvduval
      Originally Posted by fasteasysuccess View Post

      I turned down a guy last month wanting me to do some marketing for him because he was about telling people something which was bs and he admitted it to me when i called him on it and said who cares.
      Good for you. I sometimes have people approach me with offers that they claim will do wonders for my sales, but when I ask them about it I end up getting an answer about paying to find out what is behind door #1. When its outrageous combined with little information, the first thing I do is ask for more information, and 9 times out of 10, their answer to my information request tells me all I need to know.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nicholas Kemp
    Personally I don't like them - I call it "extreme manipulation marketing". But outrageous claims prove to be effective in marketing. People want to believe that there is an easy solution to making money. Create hope in someone's mind and more often than not they will buy.

    I read these claims/salespages always knowing that there is more to it.

    All marketing is manipulation. You are trying to get someone to take action that will ultimately benefit you. However, I like to believe that if you add value to someone's life you will be rewarded.
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    • Profile picture of the author dvduval
      Originally Posted by Nicholas Kemp View Post

      Personally I don't like them - I call it "extreme manipulation marketing". But outrageous claims prove to be effective in marketing. People want to believe that there is an easy solution to making money. Create hope in someone's mind and more often than not they will buy.

      I read these claims/salespages always knowing that there is more to it.

      All marketing is manipulation. You are trying to get someone to take action that will ultimately benefit you. However, I like to believe that if you add value to someone's life you will be rewarded.
      And sadly, I don't think you need to make outrageous claims to sell a product. Sometimes I wonder if those marketers are actually losing sales.
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      It is okay to contact me! I have been developing software since 1999, creating many popular products like phpLD.
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