Jason Moffatt - why did you buy TwitterJason.com?

34 replies
So there's guys on Twitter that are buying up their own-name Twitter domains:

Like J-Mo's got TwitterJason.com & Mike Filsaime's got TwitterMike.com

So why would you do this?

In the interest of forum discussion could someone explain to me, (Jason or Mike, if you're there) please, how d'ya propose to make money from it?

Peter
#buy #jason #moffatt #twitterjasoncom
  • Profile picture of the author Dennis Sim
    Hey Peter,

    I quote this from Mike's Twitter page:

    I just got TwitterMike.com -it will be used in my marketing to get people to my twitter page.
    Branding? Marketing? My guess.

    -Dennis.
    Signature
    Do not pray for an easy life, pray for the strength to endure a difficult one. - Bruce Lee
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178508].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Neil Morgan
      Peter

      Here's a possible reason.

      If someone chooses to use Twitter in the marketing and sends out links to their Twitter profile, those links would become redundant if Twitter ever chose to change their link format.

      So putting in an intermediate step that you control makes sense, apart from other branding/marketing benefits already mentioned.

      It's a good idea to do this with affiliate links too - in case the merchant changes their link format, making all your direct links dead ducks.

      Cheers,

      Neil
      Signature

      Easy email marketing automation without moving your lists.

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178522].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Neil Morgan
        I thought about doing something like that, but then, you just never know when Twitter might decide that all those domains with "Twitter" in them rightfully belong to them due to trademark issues.
        Good point Mike. Especially if one of the big-name companies with bottomless pockets bought them over. Then there are problems with Google etc not listing them due to the trademark problem.

        Cheers,

        Neil
        Signature

        Easy email marketing automation without moving your lists.

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178527].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
    Banned
    [DELETED]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178513].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      I thought about doing something like that, but then, you just never know when Twitter might decide that all those domains with "Twitter" in them rightfully belong to them due to trademark issues.
      If that's the case Mike, would you be risking anything more that your reg fee if you held it just speculatively?

      Peter
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178530].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
        Banned
        [DELETED]
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178565].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author davezan
          Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

          Somewhere (although I cannot find it at the moment), there are regulations covering this and proposed legislation to tighten it up further. The details escape me, but there is potential liability doing it.
          Here you go, you drunken Greek:

          Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

          Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

          Folks, I'm not sure it's a good idea to register those twitter domains also. Like
          BigMike said, there's no telling if the Twitter folks might make this an issue as
          the WordPress peeps did 2 years ago.

          Better ask them now rather than find out later and potentially create an issue
          no one wants.
          Signature

          David

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180772].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Kevin Riley
            Originally Posted by davezan View Post

            Here you go, you drunken Greek:

            Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

            Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

            Folks, I'm not sure it's a good idea to register those twitter domains also. Like
            BigMike said, there's no telling if the Twitter folks might make this an issue as
            the WordPress peeps did 2 years ago.

            Better ask them now rather than find out later and potentially create an issue
            no one wants.

            From the Anti-Cybersquatting Act:

            "It makes people who register domain names that are either trademarks or individual's names with the sole intent of selling the rights of the domain name to the trademark holder or individual for a profit liable to civil action."

            I have no intent to sell.

            From the Domain Name Dispute:

            "A complainant in a UDRP proceeding must establish three elements to succeed:

            * The domain name is identical or confusingly similar to a trademark or service mark in which the complainant has rights;
            * The registrant does not have any rights or legitimate interests in the domain name; and
            * The registrant registered the domain name and is using it in "bad faith."
            "

            First off, I do have a legitimate interest in TwitterKevin as my name is in there. Secondly, I am not using it in bad faith, as I'm not profitting off it and am actually sending all traffic directly to Twitter.
            Signature
            Kevin Riley, Kevin Riley Publishing, Osaka, Japan


            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180783].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author davezan
              Originally Posted by Kevin Riley View Post

              Secondly, I am not using it in bad faith, as I'm not profitting off it and am actually sending all traffic directly to Twitter.
              While UDRP is the more affordable and convenient option, it's not the only one
              a trademark holder can use. They can choose to sue under trademark dilution
              laws as well, which is one aspect ACPA covers.

              Then again, this is probably a moot issue if the Twitter folks will allow this. It's
              up to them, but hopefully it won't get ugly as everyone stands to benefit.
              Signature

              David

              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180811].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ShayB
      Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

      I thought about doing something like that, but then, you just never know when Twitter might decide that all those domains with "Twitter" in them rightfully belong to them due to trademark issues.
      I would be concerned about this, too. Especially if it was a profitable site.
      Signature
      "Fate protects fools, little children, and ships called Enterprise." ~Commander Riker
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[182881].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Killer Joe
        I think there is a misconception as to whether Twitter would go after all domains using their Trademark if they are granted Trademark protection.

        A plausable scenario is one where certain cybersquatters include Twitter in domain names like TwitterScript, MyTwitter, TwitterSite, etc etc, in a blatent attempt to steal credibility and deceive the public.

        If the attys determine that the Trademark is being abused they will, of necessity, have to go after all domains that contain Twitter in order to meet the requirements of Trademark protection.

        This is an all or nothing proposition. They either ARE going to protect the Trademark or they AREN'T. There is no way to do it half way.

        This isn't legal advice, and no, I'm not a lawyer, I'm just a guy that has a number of US Patents and I'm a little familiar with the laws regarding this. It's just my opinion based on experience.

        KJ
        Signature
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[182978].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author writergirlk
          This is a good idea. It is an excellent way to brand your twitter page.

          I just did some digging, and haven't been able to figure out if twitter is trademarked. It doesn't appear to be. Here's the terms of use:

          Twitter / Twitter Terms of Service

          Actually I just found this bit of info about the trademark application twitter filed. Somehow, this involves Blackberry opposing twitter's application... To be honest, I don't really understand what this means... Law can be confusing.

          Internet law - Evan Brown - Blackberry and Twitter in a trademark tussle? - Internet Cases - Chicago Intellectual Property attorney Blog Archive Blackberry and Twitter in a trademark tussle?
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[182997].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author davezan
            Originally Posted by kohuether View Post

            Actually I just found this bit of info about the trademark application twitter filed. Somehow, this involves Blackberry opposing twitter's application... To be honest, I don't really understand what this means... Law can be confusing.

            Internet law - Evan Brown - Blackberry and Twitter in a trademark tussle? - Internet Cases - Chicago Intellectual Property attorney Blog Archive Blackberry and Twitter in a trademark tussle?
            Evan gave one answer in that:

            That means that any other trademark owner out there who feels it would be damaged by the TWITTER mark being registered can oppose the application in the Trademark Office.
            What many people don't seem to realize is that registration is not required for
            a trademark to exist. If your state requires you to get a dog license and your
            dog doesn't have one, it's still a dog, right?

            Generally speaking, a trademark exists when one actively uses a word, symbol,
            phrase, or any combo of them (at least) "in commerce", otherwise known as a
            "common law trademark". You have one if you sell fire extinguishers that bear
            the label "Apple" in them and if your market learned to distinctively identify
            you as its source. (keyword being distinctively...)

            But common law trademarks are generally limited only to their jurisdiction, and
            can't be enforced outside that. If you sold Apple fire extinguishers in Indiana,
            you cannot enforce your Apple mark in California.

            That's where registration comes in. In a manner of speaking, a registration will
            enable you to tell others, "hey, folks, we have a trademark for the word Apple
            to sell fire extinguishers, and we'll go after you if you sell extinguishers using
            our mark even if you didn't know."

            Having a registration at the United States Patents and Trademarks Office, or
            USPTO, will give you a U.S.-wide trademark. That'll enable you to go after one
            who's using your Apple mark to sell extinguishers no matter what state they're
            in.

            However, one must go through a process at USPTO before they're (hopefully)
            granted one, part of which is allowing others to object to your application for
            the mark. The reason for that is others might be using the same word for their
            own commercial venture and might cause "likelihood of confusion", which TMs
            aim to prevent from happening.

            So if you filed an application at USPTO for Apple to sell fire extinguishers, plus
            you passed their other requirements, USPTO will give others a chance to post
            their objection. Big guys like Apple Computers to oppose it, saying your mark
            can confuse others with their own.

            That's what the Twitter folks are going through right now, based on what Evan
            has blogged and Big Mike posted here. Twitter arguably has a trademark (and
            their application states what for if you search for it in uspto.gov, although the
            link expires if you post it here), but time will tell if USPTO will finally grant them
            a Federal registration or not.

            One of the risks trademark holders face is called "dilution":

            Trademark dilution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

            A trademark is diluted when the use of similar or identical trademarks in other non-competing markets means that the trademark in and of itself will lose its capacity to signify a single source.
            Twitter, like any other mark holder, faces that risk, more so now that Jason et
            al have registered domain names bearing it. But like I said, it's up to Twitter if
            they decide to go after them or not, or let them continue on if they think it'll
            be a win-win situation.

            I'm not a lawyer, and I can be wrong on some details. Feel free to check with
            licensed and experienced people who do these things for a living.

            Originally Posted by Alice Seba View Post

            Another potential problem with the idea. Jason is not "jason" on Twitter. Mike Filsaime is not "mike".

            To me it would make more sense to buy a domain that included your username instead so people will remember your actual name on the site. If people remember twittermike.com, they might just @mike or try going to twitter.com/mike when they know how the site works. If they do that, they'll reach some other dude.

            Alice
            That's another thought, although that's probably negligible. Still...
            Signature

            David

            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[183171].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Alice Seba
              Originally Posted by davezan View Post

              That's another thought, although that's probably negligible. Still...
              Well, if the reasoning behind purchasing the domain is that people can't remember twitter.com/mikefilsaime but they'll remember twittermike.com then for these people with failing memories it could be an issue. ;-)

              But if they always just type twittermike.com they'll never get lost and I guess that's the hope.

              Interestingly enough, I get people trying to @ me at my real name, but that's not my username so I miss messages too. I see it happen with others...they just type in what they think your username is to try to speak to you.

              Sure, it's probably a small point, but something to consider.

              Alice
              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[183907].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author nikolaaa
    When I posted to twitter with less then 200 followers it sent me 15 sales !
    So, I understand why they paid few dollars for domain names.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178515].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Jason Moffatt
      Twitter / PeterBestel sent me a Twitter
      asking me if I'd answer this thread.



      1. People always mispell my last name.

      2. In a signature of a email www.twitterjason.com will look
      cleaner then Twitter / jasonmoffatt

      3. Many people won't remember the twitter address by memory
      but TwitterJason or TwitterMike is easier to remember/spell.

      4. You can plug that name and have people remember it better
      then using your first and last name. Good for radio, tv, email,
      etc etc.

      5. Obviously I'd redirect the domain name to my Twitter page.

      6. The domain name will build value. Will establish time on the domain.

      7. And I few other reasons I'll probably keep to myself!

      Peace
      Signature
      FREE 7-Day Video Training On How To Get People To Know, Like, Trust & Buy From You - http://www.nichefamous.com/
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178533].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
        Cheers Jason

        That's very helpful. It just leaves us guessing what #7 is.

        Peter
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178537].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Daniel Molano
        Makes perfect sense and you just gave me an "ah-ha!" moment.

        Originally Posted by Jason Moffatt View Post

        Twitter / PeterBestel sent me a Twitter
        asking me if I'd answer this thread.



        1. People always mispell my last name.

        2. In a signature of a email www.twitterjason.com will look
        cleaner then Twitter / jasonmoffatt

        3. Many people won't remember the twitter address by memory
        but TwitterJason or TwitterMike is easier to remember/spell.

        4. You can plug that name and have people remember it better
        then using your first and last name. Good for radio, tv, email,
        etc etc.

        5. Obviously I'd redirect the domain name to my Twitter page.

        6. The domain name will build value. Will establish time on the domain.

        7. And I few other reasons I'll probably keep to myself!

        Peace
        Signature
        Como Ganar Dinero Por Internet - Spanish Make Money Online Site

        Daniel Molano
        - LinkedIn Profile
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180481].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author lgibbon
    Banned
    Surely it would be better creating a subdomain
    called twitter on your name domain eg:
    twitter.yourdomainname.com
    Looks a lot better.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178528].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author TiffanyLambert
    Well if Twitter cares, or may in the future, you could always use FollowJason or TweetJason

    They can't claim those
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[178723].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author samstephens
    As always, it's a question best suited for a lawyer instead of a drunken Greek, LOL.
    ...unless your laywer IS a drunken greek, then it's six of one, half a dozen of the other...
    Signature
    DLGuard v5 - The Warrior Edition
    Full integration with JVZoo, DigiResults, and WSO Pro for secure WSO's and WSO memberships.

    www.dlguard.com
    Serving the Warrior Forum since 2004
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180205].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Chris Lockwood
    Do we even know that the word Twitter is trademarked? They don't indicate that on the site. Where's the R symbol on the logo?

    If all people are doing is using a domain with twitter in it to redirect to their page on Twitter, I doubt anyone would get upset about it.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180466].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author pjs
    Originally Posted by Peter Bestel View Post

    So there's guys on Twitter that are buying up their own-name Twitter domains:

    Like J-Mo's got TwitterJason.com & Mike Filsaime's got TwitterMike.com

    So why would you do this?

    In the interest of forum discussion could someone explain to me, (Jason or Mike, if you're there) please, how d'ya propose to make money from it?

    Peter
    Peter,

    HAHA this is funny. This morning I checked the availability of TwitterPeter.com and saw that you bought it about 1 hour before I checked. I saw your name and couldn't remember where I knew it from.. Should of known you were a warrior

    Enjoy the domain...

    (the other) Peter
    Signature
    Mom and Pop Money WSO *** - How ONE Lead Capture Page Made $9K in 2 Weeks in the "Offline" niche!

    PeterSanchez.com >>> FollowPeter.com (Twitter)
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180514].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Peter Bestel
      Originally Posted by pjs View Post

      Peter,

      HAHA this is funny. This morning I checked the availability of TwitterPeter.com and saw that you bought it about 1 hour before I checked. I saw your name and couldn't remember where I knew it from.. Should of known you were a warrior

      Enjoy the domain...

      (the other) Peter
      Yeah, sorry Peter - it had to be done! (Don't tell anyone, but TwitterPete.com was available when last I looked )

      As Kevin said, at $8 this is a no-brainer. Whatever the arguments are against it, they're far outweighed by the positives (IMO)

      Peter
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180841].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author VegasVince
        Ja Mo...bought TwitterJason.com cuz after several...6packs...it's tough to spell M-O-F-F-A-T-T without screwin' it up. So as usual, Mo is smart.

        Cuz even when my boy is half shitfaced...he can spit out TwitterJason.Com....or at least I hope he can.

        I actually got drunk one night about a year ago..and registered

        www.barackolbama.com

        Vinnie is the proud owner of that...after a couple too many shots of gentleman jack with a water back.

        And no.....it aint no affilliate site..it aint even parked. I'd forgot all about it.

        All these Florida crackers around here prounounce his name Ol....bama.....so I figured what the hell. And now dude might be president. So maybe it's worth somethin?

        I think I own the dot net or dot org too...same site.

        So Vince is lookin' to sell...assuming it's worth anything.

        Much like JaMo...and Sylvia Brown......Vegas Vince is a visionary......


        xxxVegas Vince
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180936].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Scott Ames
    Twitter could take them, but I've been through that before. You get a letter from an anal attorney quoting all kinds of laws about trademarks, etc. and telling you how much you have damaged the company, yada yada.

    For a few bucks its worth the risk. If they demand those names, so be it. In the meantime it costs little to use them.
    Signature

    Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm. -Winston Churchill

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180532].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Chris Monty
    This is an interesting idea. I'm not ready to take that plunge yet, however. I'll wait and see if Twitter holds up over time.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180545].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Ben Roy
    Thanks for the heads up. I just snagged TwitterBen.com before someone else did. No immediate plans, but better safe than sorry, right?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180600].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author snakez0r
      Originally Posted by Ben Roy View Post

      Thanks for the heads up. I just snagged TwitterBen.com before someone else did. No immediate plans, but better safe than sorry, right?
      Hahaha, damn you! Beat me to it
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180787].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Chad Heffelfinger
    I have to admit I saw Mike and Jason snag theirs last night and went ahead and made sure to get www.TwitterChad.com before it was gone.

    The reasons Jason mentioned are all valid The last name spelling is an issue for me as well and can cause problems. TwitterChad is much easier to remember as well as much easier to brand then C_Heffelfinger.

    That is an issue I have with Twitter and their ID's, they don't give people with long last names enough space to put their whole name in there. I can't even put ChadHeffelfinger as my Twitter username.

    To me, even with the risk of having to give it up later it is well worth the $9.00 for the domain name.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180699].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Kevin Riley
      I grabbed TwitterKevin.com as soon as I saw what Mike had done. At $8 to register a domain it's a no-brainer, even if Twitter pulled an eBay on us.

      It took me all of two minutes to grab the domain, slap it up on HG with a redirect, and I'm set. Now, I can just give people the shorter TwitterKevin.com instead of Twitter.com/kevinriley. Sure, it's not a big difference but every little detail counts.

      And lastly, TwitterKevin has a cool ring to it.
      Signature
      Kevin Riley, Kevin Riley Publishing, Osaka, Japan


      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[180748].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author dougyitbos
        I think these domains would fall under fair use.
        Twitter offers a service and you are using the domain to make it easy for people to find you using that service. It's not like you are setting up a site to mock,imitate, or compete with twitter.

        I think this is a great idea - and I doubt there is any REAL risk.

        (though I think the sub domain idea is equally great and wont require another domain)
        Signature
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[181038].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Jose Delgado
          Just got one myself.

          I kind of liked the subdomain option, but TwitterJose just sound WAY cooler.

          If twitter decides to take the names, i'll be happy to hand it to them. No problem.
          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[182871].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
    I saw them doing it too - I'm not bothering.
    Signature

    nothing to see here.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[181022].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author SeanIM
    Congrats to all the winners.
    Signature
    Sean Mitchell -
    Online Marketing & Tech Consultant Since 1999
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[183079].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Alice Seba
    Another potential problem with the idea. Jason is not "jason" on Twitter. Mike Filsaime is not "mike".

    To me it would make more sense to buy a domain that included your username instead so people will remember your actual name on the site. If people remember twittermike.com, they might just @mike or try going to twitter.com/mike when they know how the site works. If they do that, they'll reach some other dude.

    Alice
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[183087].message }}

Trending Topics