The Great Article Marketing Clickthrough Rate Debate - How To Get a 50% CTR On All Of Your Articles!

29 replies
Warriors,

For years I have sat back and watched people boast some seriously high overall click-through rates on their article marketing campaigns. I'm talking upwards of 50-75%. These marketers apparently have the magic ingredients to blow their competition out of the water!

And now I am going to share it with you - for FREE!

So how did they do it?

Quite honestly, I don't believe they did.

I sincerely believe they are just blowing smoke in an effort to boost their ego or try to make sales for their latest "product."

Sorry for the anti-climax.

Here's why I say this...

I recently did a study of CTRs with the help of several VERY serious and respected article marketers in the industry. Some of them you may have heard of, some of them...probably not. But these folks are quiety (some not so quietly - LOL) raking in tons of money using article marketing as one of their main marketing strategies.

It quickly became obvious to me - as I suspected for quite some time - that the average CTR was nowhere near 50%. Not one single marketer had an overall CTR above 25%. And most were down at around a 15% CTR.

Note: I did not take their word for it. I logged into their account (with their permission, of course) and looked at their stats myself! EZA, AB, AD, GOArticles and a few others. Plus, I used stats from my own article directories and my own niche campaigns as well.

This study was done about 2 months ago, but I have kept it to myself until now.

In another thread, http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...-question.html, another great article marketer, Tim Gorman, and I simultaneoulsy posted about CTRs not being as high as most people think they should be. This prompted me to start this thread so we didn't hijack the other one.

Even the great Steven Wags himself revealed less than a 10% CTR in his most profitable niche. And others like the beautiful Tina and Alexa and others jumped in to help verify.

Sure, some single articles may get a CTR of 50% if their view counts are low, but an overall campaign CTR will most likely not come close to that.

If someone could get a 50% CTR on an article marketing campaign, I guarantee they aren't going to be revealing their secrets on a public forum.

So guys and gals - if you hear anyone bragging about an overall CTR that seems a bit high, I would be highly cautious if they try and lead you to a sales page!

Good luck and KEEP WRITING!
Allen Graves
#50% #article #articles #clickthrough #ctr #debate #great #marketing #rate
  • Profile picture of the author JayXtreme
    Yes, Yes, and triple Yes.

    CTR discussions are mostly Bull****... What really matters is profit, the bottom line, R.O.I.

    A 60% CTR is useless if your end page is a damp conversion. I've had profitable campaigns from articles with a CTR of less than 8%.

    I much prefer to focus on the overall picture.

    Great share, Allen

    Jay
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  • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
    I have no doubt that this thread is going to ruffle the feathers of quite a
    few people.

    And that's all I'm saying.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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      • Profile picture of the author Barry Unruh
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        Same here - I earn a lot more now, when my average CTR happens to be about 20%, than I ever did when it was more like 40%.
        That is a magical comment. It shows the difference between writing articles which are written to generate curiosity clicks, or written to get interested clicks.

        In the final analysis it is better to have 15% CTR on an article and have your high CTR on your landing pages.

        I'll bet Alexa can verify when her CTR dropped on her articles, her CTR increased on her conversion pages at the same time.

        Thank you Allen, for starting this thread. I write a lot of articles and was always amazed with people reporting CTR's averaging in the 40 to 50% range. I never worried about it, I liked the way my articles flowed into and through my resource boxes, and they are accomplishing the final task, getting interested people to the next step, not browsers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Loren Woirhaye
    I agree.

    I have some methods I use that produce better clickthrough rates
    than non-methods I used to use.... and even on occasion I'll
    see an article get a dazzling-high clickthrough rate at first
    (from niche competitors gandering my ideas, mostly, I reckon) -
    but over time those impressive rates sink as more "real" visitors
    (likely buyers, not spies) look at the articles.

    It's smart, like Jay says, to look at the whole picture. I don't
    really care about clickthrough rates on articles too much. I
    care about getting leads and making sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author Allen Graves
    I think a lot more people are actually going to feel better about their effort than are going to have their feathers ruffled.

    I am just so tired of people blowing pipe dreams up other people's butts just to make a buck or two.

    If we just keep things real and not in fantasyland, then those who are averaging a modest 15% CTR won't think they are miserable failures!

    Allen
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    • Profile picture of the author rainyclayday
      I agree, and I think that when people post things like that (unnaturally high CTR) it ultimately causes newbies to become discouraged when they don't see similar results. Perhaps the newbie is doing great, having some sales even, but then they may read they are supposed to be getting 50% CTR, so they abandon the campaign and move to something else. What a shame.

      Thanks for the post, good info.
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  • Profile picture of the author Sylvia Meier
    Well I do agree, it's important to also note, there will always be exceptions to that. Granted the majority will fall within those ranges there are others who will fall outside of it.

    I have articles that have tens of thousands of veiws and around 50% CTR, so it is not always only on article with lower veiws that the CTR is high. And my overall CTR is above 20%. But anytime I have taught anything about article marketing, I've told them that those numbers are not in the normal and that I believe Chris Knight mentioned around 6% overall and you are doing well.

    My thoughts, do it enough times, see which articles perform best for you, mimic them to the best of your abilities keep testing and keep trying. Not everyone is going to have the same numbers are others, plain and simple. And not all niches will have the same rates as others will.

    Sylvia
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  • Profile picture of the author TimG
    Allen,
    So glad you started this thread because it has really become an increasing concern of mine. Far to many people are getting stuck (fascinated) with trying to achieve a ultra-high CTR that is has started distorting the true mechanics behind a successful article marketing campaign.

    I recently posted my EZA stats in another thread and it showed my overall CTR as being 9.9% (which I am happy and comfortable with). Someone pointed out the low CTR and I provided the following as to why:

    1 - The CTR is low (9.9%) because most of my initial clicks were never tracked and I have about 350 articles that lead nowhere due to jacked up hyperlinks...etc.

    2 - The articles that do well for me (meaning get a high CTR) get my attention, the articles that have a low CTR are put on the back burner until I get time to identify and fix the problem (poor article content, poor resource box...Etc).

    3 - Until recently, EZA took your article offline when you made a change to it - I was unwilling to work on improving my resource boxes due to the article coming down. Now that you can make changes on the fly without removing the article I can go back in and correct my poorly performing resource boxes.

    4 - I have lots of articles that are submitted for one niche with a resource box for a completely different niche. As you would expect the CTR for those articles is in the toilet but I'm not after the CTR for those articles. They are purely for positioning the article they link to higher in the search engines (backlink love).

    5 - Sometimes we kill our own CTR without intionally doing so because it is part of the business.

    For example, I am subscribed to many authors via EZA's author notification list so I receive an email everytime they post a new article. I am subscribed based on the niche they are in and because they are prolific authors.

    I can tell you that even though I read the articles they submit I don't click on the link in their resource box so they get an article view but no CTR - bad for their stats but that is the price for being a prolific author or in a niche I am researching.

    6 - To futher caveat point #5 - Tons of people are using EZA as part of their research campaigns. I guarantee they read the articles they click on as part of their research process but in many cases they don't click on the links in the resource boxes.

    This includes folks that are looking for content to rewrite (not saying I advocate this practice). They are not interested in resource box links and clicking through to see what goodies await them because they are only looking for content to rewrite.

    Right now I have about 14 different pen names and my CTR is 9.8% for my lowest pen name and 21.1% for my best name with everyone else in between.

    For individual articles I go from a low of 0% to a high of 62.3% (and that article has had well over 10,000 page views) but those stats don't even mean that much because I can manipulate the data to show you whatever I want which is why CTR is really a jaded stat to monitor to some extent.

    It's not always about the static numbers because they can be a smoke and mirrors effect. It's what income is generated at the end of the day and only the article marketer knows that information.

    Keep this in mind, would you rather have an article that has had 10 views but a 50% CTR (5 clicks) or an article that has had 20,000 page views with a 9.9% CTR (1980 clicks) - Knowing the actual numbers behind this business I'll take the 9.9% rate every day of the week.

    Respectfully,
    Tim
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  • Profile picture of the author Marhelper
    Allen, hard to argue the point. In the end what matters is the bottom line (sales). I have had articles get insane CTR #s (up to 90% CTR) but I have also had some real stinkers as well (single digits).
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  • Profile picture of the author Emailrevealer
    I don't know. It seems to me that if the number of views is constant then increasing the CTR can only bring higher sales if everything else is equal. A higher CTR should always be desired.

    It seems to me that any traffic to my site is better than none.

    For instance recently I signed up a very high profile client as an affiliate. Even tho the traffic is not really targeted traffic. Certainly not as targeted as my article traffic i'm still converting to sales.
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    • Profile picture of the author TimG
      Originally Posted by Emailrevealer View Post

      I don't know. It seems to me that if the number of views is constant then increasing the CTR can only bring higher sales if everything else is equal. A higher CTR should always be desired.

      It seems to me that any traffic to my site is better than none.

      For instance recently I signed up a very high profile client as an affiliate. Even tho the traffic is not really targeted traffic. Certainly not as targeted as my article traffic i'm still converting to sales.
      Agreed, a higher CTR is desirable but the more articles you put into circulation the harder it becomes to maintain a high CTR across the board for every article.

      Some articles will do well, others will do poorly and will require some form of adjustment (testing/tweaking) in order to increase their CTR. At that moment it becomes a decision point do you create more articles or improve the existing articles.

      If you can afford outsourcing then the choice is easy. You outsource new articles while improving the existing inventory but if you are a 1 person operation then you have to focus your efforts on whatever task provides the best ROI for your time.

      Respectfully,
      Tim
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  • Profile picture of the author Shermaine
    Originally Posted by Allen Graves View Post


    It quickly became obvious to me - as I suspected for quite some time - that the average CTR was nowhere near 50%. Not one single marketer had an overall CTR above 25%. And most were down at around a 15% CTR.
    Thanks Allen... Now I don't feel so frustrated about my CTR. Honestly, I was a little puzzled about what I was doing wrong... I personally write all my articles and my CTR is a steady 18 point something per cent the last time I checked.

    I was wondering why couldn't I achieve an average of 25% or more CTR; I fiddled around with the length of the article, different styles of writing, hyped up some articles, injected a condescending tone in others... Nothing was working, except that the hyped up articles achieved click through rates of over 40% and the articles with real content all received less than 10% CTR.

    How's that for some content versus hype debates. :rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author ArticlePrince
    The time that you spend trying to get one article to convert at 50% could be spent writing 5 more articles that convert at 15%.... The very few that I've had convert that high (40%+) are from keywords getting only a few searches a day that are hyper targeted.
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  • Profile picture of the author rft123
    I enjoy article writing and I have a had some good success with it. I have articles that have a CTR of 50-75%, but overall my CTR is more like 13%. I am interested in any methods that I can find to boost that rate, but, after talking with others who have a lot more experience at article marketing than I do, I feel pretty good about what I have accomplished and am looking forward to doing a lot more article marketing.
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  • Profile picture of the author gyl1989113
    great,but how can I increase the CTR,,,
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  • Profile picture of the author tdpubs
    Good going folks; this is why I keep coming back to the Warriors. As an article marketer, I've checked my stats and checked my Paypal account. When my Paypal account is growing, I tweak my work to keep it moving in that direction. When my Paypal starts to drop, I adjust accordingly to bring it back up. Sometimes there is a three week lag between actions and results; sometimes it's the next day.

    There are many variables to weigh and consider; CTR is just one of them.
    If I'm shooting for back links, I tailor my writing strategy for that purpose. It affects my CTR ratio with the top three directories but I know it does not matter as long as I achieve the desired results.
    Great posts all around.
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    • Profile picture of the author TimG
      Originally Posted by tdpubs View Post

      There are many variables to weigh and consider; CTR is just one of them. If I'm shooting for back links, I tailor my writing strategy for that purpose. It affects my CTR ratio with the top three directories but I know it does not matter as long as I achieve the desired results. Great posts all around.
      Exactly - conducting an article marketing campaign for backlink purposes is completely different from conducting an article marketing campaign for traffic generating purposes and so on....

      Once you know the purpose of your articles you create them in a different manner.

      Respectfully,
      Tim
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  • Profile picture of the author PCRoger
    I have been active in several threads on a couple of forums about this topic, and I have been surprised at the way some people respond.

    Many views and even many clicks - as TimG mentioned - are just your competition, especially at ezine.

    The only thing that counts are sales, and to get the most from your efforts you need to track where your sales are coming from in order to figure out how to increase them.

    Sure, you can't have a sale without a view or a click (actually, you could without a click) in your stat box, but long term marketers who do track have likely found that certain articles bring in sales and others simply don't - regardless of stats.

    You can lie in you resource box to encourage clickthrus but the odd of that click converting are minuscule.

    Super high views/clicks/percentages do not necessarily mean profits. Writing content that leads a person with a problem to a solution to that problem will.

    Regards,
    PCRoger.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      For those asking about how to increase their CTR, here are a few tips that
      might help.

      1. Understand the psychology of your target market. I could probably write
      a book on this but for the sake of brevity, you need to understand what it
      is YOUR market is REALLY after.

      For example, are they an info seeking market? Meaning, are they reading
      articles just for the sake of getting information and not really interested in
      any purchased solution? If so, you're probably wasting your time writing
      for them in the first place. This is a common market for things where there
      is a ton of free info out there at many authority sites.

      For example, if you're into Texas Hold 'Em, you will find many huge sites
      out there with complete instructions on how to play the game (rules)
      and tips on winning. If you write an article with tips in this niche, that's
      about as far as it's going to go, in most cases.

      So, the way you tackle this market is with articles that don't share tips
      but maybe just rules of the game and then winning potential. This will
      excite people to want to learn how to play the game. THEN they might
      check out your resource box if they're interested in getting that edge.

      But this will only work with those absolutely newest to the game. Those
      who are already fairly knowledgeable will probably just go to your article
      to see what tip you have. If it's something they didn't know before (which
      is unlikely at this stage) then they MIGHT check out your product. But in
      most cases, they won't.

      Point is, each market is different.

      If you really want to increase your CTR through this point (understanding
      buyer psychology) then you want to hit niches where there is a real
      burning need for an immediate solution, such as when somebody has a
      serious health issue.

      My best CTR is in the health niche...hands down.

      IM, is so-so and gambling is horrible.

      Dating is good.

      Debt relief is excellent.

      The greater the need, the greater the CTR if....

      2. Your Resource Box Is Well Constructed

      This is the next problem that needs to be corrected. No matter how
      great the need for a solution, your CTR is only going to be as good as
      the quality of your resource box.

      Again, each niche is different. Don't believe the generalization that
      resource boxes that read like bios are no good. In most niches, they
      aren't...but...

      If you are targeting professionals like doctors, lawyers, etc., they will
      want to know what your qualifications are.

      So if you can say something like, "John Doe is a doctor of <whatever> for
      30 years..." that is going to carry some major weight with the people
      reading that article IF they are professionals like yourself.

      However, in most common niches, you want to stick to the pain/solution
      resource box.

      Essentially, here is how I construct them.

      1. Remind them of their pain first.
      2. Give them the URL where their pain will be alleviated.
      3. Tell them what will happen if they go there.

      For example.

      Tired of not being able to get a date because you look like something
      out of an Mary Shelley novel? Visit my site at (URL) and get
      rid of your acne naturally in just 3 days.

      Something like that.

      If the person reading your article is REALLY serious about wanting to
      get rid of their acne, trust me, they'll at least check out your site. They
      may not buy the solution, but they'll check it out.

      3. Increase The Quality Of Your Article

      You want more click thrus? Write a better article. If the article is so bad
      that it's not worth reading, nobody will make it down to your resource
      box.

      Ah, but this is a double edge sword. If the article is too good, they may
      have all the info they need and thus no reason to click through.

      It's a fine balancing act.

      4. Offer A Bribe

      Want to get click thrus? Offer a bribe. Give the reader a good reason to
      click through. Free reports work well in some niches and not so well in
      others. Again, this comes down to understanding your target market.

      IMers are the worst. It is almost impossible to get them to click through
      unless they're just checking out what you're doing for research purposes.

      That's why, in that niche, you really have to know your stuff and have
      something to offer that is BETTER than what that IMer already has stuck
      in his head.

      In other words...

      5. You Have To Know Your Stuff

      There is no way around this. You want to increase your CTR, you have
      to not only know what you're talking about, but you have to do it with
      a confidence that jumps out from the page when they read it.

      They don't have to like you. Hell, they may think you're the most pompous
      ass ******* that ever walked this planet, but after they're done reading
      your article, this is what they have to say to themselves.

      "Damn, I gotta know what it is that HE knows that's made him so
      successful."

      There you go. You want to increase your CTR, that's how to do it.

      As I said, my CTR is nothing to write home about, but I still get my 10 to
      20 opt ins every day like clockwork.

      I still make over 1K with every broadcast to my various lists.

      So I must be doing something right.
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      • Profile picture of the author mikemcmillan
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        For those asking about how to increase their CTR, here are a few tips that
        might help...

        2. Your Resource Box Is Well Constructed


        This is the next problem that needs to be corrected. No matter how
        great the need for a solution, your CTR is only going to be as good as
        the quality of your resource box....

        However, in most common niches, you want to stick to the pain/solution
        resource box.

        Essentially, here is how I construct them.

        1. Remind them of their pain first.
        2. Give them the URL where their pain will be alleviated.
        3. Tell them what will happen if they go there.


        For all of the newbies (really everyone) there are little nuggets of gold all over this forum. Guys like Steven make them easy to find. This one is excellent as are all of his. Thanks SW.

        P.S. In a book (forgot the title) by W. Clement Stone he talked about "little hinges that swing great doors". Steven gave you a little hinge above with his entire post--go swing some great doors with it!--Mike
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    • Profile picture of the author TimG
      Originally Posted by PCRoger View Post

      You can lie in you resource box to encourage clickthrus but the odd of that click converting are minuscule.

      Super high views/clicks/percentages do not necessarily mean profits. Writing content that leads a person with a problem to a solution to that problem will.

      Regards,
      PCRoger.
      Aha......love that wisdom. In the never ending quest to increase the CTR some marketers could go to the extreme to make wild claims and outright lie in order to obtain the click but on the other side of the fence there awaits no sale because the click is what I call a fabricated click instead of an earned click.

      The fabricated clicks usuallly fail to do anything but increase an article's CTR but the earned click more often then not creates an income producing opportunity for the author.

      Work towards obtaining the earned click and not the fabricated click...just one more piece making up a successful article marketing campaign.

      Respectfully,
      Tim
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      • Profile picture of the author Justin Jordan
        My average clickthrough is around twenty percent, and I find that's pretty consistent through most of the niches I've tried.

        The keyword there being most.

        One of the niches I was in my average across the articles I did was fifty two percent, and this was on a few hundred views per article. I didn't do anything different with my resource box, the niche just happened to be one that people clicked on the links a lot.

        The downside was that people didn't buy very often in that niche, so I made less money in that than I did in niches that had a much lower CTR and less views. It goes that way sometimes.

        On the other hand, I had another niche where my CTR was something like five percent. So at least some of the numbers depends on the niche, and CTR doesn't, as Alexa said, necessarily equate to more money.

        Those two niches were reverse cell phone look ups and pet anti aging by the way, if anyone would like to have a go at it.
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  • Profile picture of the author mikemcmillan
    Allen, bless you guy! You have just stated what I always thought in my heart must be true but couldn't prove. Like others have said, I sometimes felt impotent with a 10-15% CTR and couldn't understand how others bragged about 50-70% rates. I feel much better now because "the source" of article marketing know-how has spoken and it makes total sense. Thank you so much for sharing!

    --Mike
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  • Profile picture of the author cashcow
    Thanks for posting this - I was starting to think there was something wrong with me!

    The time that you spend trying to get one article to convert at 50% could be spent writing 5 more articles that convert at 15%.... The very few that I've had convert that high (40%+) are from keywords getting only a few searches a day that are hyper targeted.
    I never thought of looking at it this way....
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  • Profile picture of the author Allen Graves
    Thanks to everyone.

    I'm glad that most of you agree that bringing this out into the open is a good thing.

    I received a couple of emails over the weekend about this thread. A few people were upset that I posted this information, claiming that I am "ruining" their business.

    Well, quite frankly, I don't care. I have been watching you guys for too long - claiming that 50% is so easy if they just buy your product or do it your way (which you'll find out right after the Paypal thank you page).

    The truth is (and you know it) that when these marketers try and try, and cannot obtain that 50% CTR that you say is so easy, guess what they do...THEY QUIT...and that ruins legitimate article marketing businesses.

    It also leads to a bad name on the entire article marketing industry.

    So there ya go. I hope this doesn't sound too harsh. I'm really a nice guy.

    Good luck and KEEP WRITING!
    Allen Graves
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  • Profile picture of the author TimG
    One other thing I forgot to add in terms of a high CTR. In some cases if you are writing articles on a hot trend or seasonal trend you can achieve lots of page views and click-throughs but eventually the hot trend becomes luke warm or heaven forbid cold in which case you might still generate page views but the CTR tends to drop off drastically.

    Respectfully,
    Tim
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