Do you still fall for gimmicks and magic tricks?!

by Big Al
8 replies
I've just been laughing at myself as I browsed the WSO and got drawn into sales pages, comments and people asking if the product on earning $$$ per day involves posting on "do-follow" blogs.

The more I read ... the more I get sucked into the whole "This could really be it ... the one that changes everything ... "

Even though I've earnt ok money today.

Anyway after laughing at myself - I was just wondering if anyone here (especially the guys who've been here a long long time) still get drawn into sales pages and the emotional triggers that the good ones pull?

Al

P.S. I'm not saying that WSO's are gimmicks ... but we all know that picking one proven system (or one WSO using proven methods) then working at it is the key to success.

P.P.S. Plus I really like getting drawn into sales messages ... it's a bit like when you walk down the road and think about what you'd spend a lottery winning on.
#fall #gimmicks #magic #tricks
  • Profile picture of the author Ryan D
    Banned
    If it's under $100, I'm a total sucker and will fall for anything. Over that, I put my guard up and mull things over a little more. Over $1500, I'm skeptical as h*ll.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2152779].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author psresearch
    I've always thought it would be fun to have a sort of "Guess What It Is" contest for blind sales pages.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2153234].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author JayPeete
    I love reading them and even buying them! They make me a better marketer.
    Signature
    What Misunderstood Traffic Source SUCKS In
    3 Million Visitors Daily and Spits Out
    $560.81 Per Day In Commissions?
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2153418].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author CDarklock
    One of the earliest written references to scams and confidence games says:

    "Doubtless the pleasure is as great / of being cheated as to cheat."

    (I don't have the book close to hand, but I seem to recall it's the caption to one of the earliest known illustrations of the cups-and-balls routine.)

    On some level, those of us who really love sales and marketing enjoy falling for a scam. We laugh about it. When we order the "Universal coat hanger: one size fits all" for $19.95, we think it's funny when the vendor sends us a nail. We're likely to frame it, put it on the wall, and tell people the story over and over again.

    And a lot of people look at us funny and say "so... you're telling me you're a gullible idiot."

    Well, maybe. But so are you. So are we all. We're machines made of meat. Push the right buttons and we jump. No matter how intricately we know the game, it works just as well... and sometimes better.

    I've completely stymied other magicians by showing them that I carry a small copy of the Erdnase sleight-of-hand reference. They look at it, open it to where my bookmark is, and see the bookmark is on card palming. Then they go "ahh, he palms cards."

    And five minutes later, they're CONVINCED that I am the best person in the world at palming cards, because they can't catch me doing it.

    Because I don't. I suck so bad at palming cards, I don't even try. It's classic misdirection - and magicians of all skill levels fall for it every... single... time.
    Signature
    "The Golden Town is the Golden Town no longer. They have sold their pillars for brass and their temples for money, they have made coins out of their golden doors. It is become a dark town full of trouble, there is no ease in its streets, beauty has left it and the old songs are gone." - Lord Dunsany, The Messengers
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2153454].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author da1fitz
      Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

      One of the earliest written references to scams and confidence games says:

      "Doubtless the pleasure is as great / of being cheated as to cheat."

      (I don't have the book close to hand, but I seem to recall it's the caption to one of the earliest known illustrations of the cups-and-balls routine.)

      On some level, those of us who really love sales and marketing enjoy falling for a scam. We laugh about it. When we order the "Universal coat hanger: one size fits all" for $19.95, we think it's funny when the vendor sends us a nail. We're likely to frame it, put it on the wall, and tell people the story over and over again.

      And a lot of people look at us funny and say "so... you're telling me you're a gullible idiot."

      Well, maybe. But so are you. So are we all. We're machines made of meat. Push the right buttons and we jump. No matter how intricately we know the game, it works just as well... and sometimes better.

      I've completely stymied other magicians by showing them that I carry a small copy of the Erdnase sleight-of-hand reference. They look at it, open it to where my bookmark is, and see the bookmark is on card palming. Then they go "ahh, he palms cards."

      And five minutes later, they're CONVINCED that I am the best person in the world at palming cards, because they can't catch me doing it.

      Because I don't. I suck so bad at palming cards, I don't even try. It's classic misdirection - and magicians of all skill levels fall for it every... single... time.
      I was so gonna buy the Universal coat hanger
      Palming cards isnt magic - doh the tooth fairy told me different
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2153577].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author George Wright
      Originally Posted by CDarklock View Post

      One of the earliest written references to scams and confidence games says:

      "Doubtless the pleasure is as great / of being cheated as to cheat."

      (I don't have the book close to hand, but I seem to recall it's the caption to one of the earliest known illustrations of the cups-and-balls routine.)

      On some level, those of us who really love sales and marketing enjoy falling for a scam. We laugh about it. When we order the "Universal coat hanger: one size fits all" for $19.95, we think it's funny when the vendor sends us a nail. We're likely to frame it, put it on the wall, and tell people the story over and over again.

      And a lot of people look at us funny and say "so... you're telling me you're a gullible idiot."

      Well, maybe. But so are you. So are we all. We're machines made of meat. Push the right buttons and we jump. No matter how intricately we know the game, it works just as well... and sometimes better.

      I've completely stymied other magicians by showing them that I carry a small copy of the Erdnase sleight-of-hand reference. They look at it, open it to where my bookmark is, and see the bookmark is on card palming. Then they go "ahh, he palms cards."

      And five minutes later, they're CONVINCED that I am the best person in the world at palming cards, because they can't catch me doing it.

      Because I don't. I suck so bad at palming cards, I don't even try. It's classic misdirection - and magicians of all skill levels fall for it every... single... time.
      I still cherish my bronze/actually copper bust of Lincoln. $1.00 for a penny. not bad.

      George Wright
      Signature
      "The first chapter sells the book; the last chapter sells the next book." Mickey Spillane
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2153594].message }}
  • The only magic tricks are fall for are the illusion ones by famous illusionists like the Mind Freak Kris Angel, or those performed by Cirque du Soleil and so on. Those who promise me to make X amount of money per day are actually comedians who make me laugh.

    Don't get me wrong, maybe there is ONE of those programs that can actually deliver, but most do not. I rather work hard and earn my own money doing something I love, writing.
    Signature
    Content Article Writer
    Rich Content Articles
    SEO Article Writing
    Article Writer For Hire
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2153608].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author ExRat
      Hi Big Al,

      I've just been laughing at myself as I browsed the WSO and got drawn into sales pages, comments and people asking if the product on earning $$$ per day involves posting on "do-follow" blogs.

      The more I read ... the more I get sucked into the whole "This could really be it ... the one that changes everything ... "
      [snip]

      Plus I really like getting drawn into sales messages ... it's a bit like when you walk down the road and think about what you'd spend a lottery winning on.
      If you enjoy that, you should try the other forums here, too

      The WSO forum is for sales letters, so you'd expect to find plenty of sales letters there.

      One 'sleight of hand' therefore, is to use a surreptitious sales message in a place where people might not be quite as likely to expect to find it. Story-telling is a particularly useful sales technique, as you can see on many splogs, internet wide.

      I often have fun noticing these story-telling guerrilla salesletters in this part of the forum.
      Signature


      Roger Davis

      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2153676].message }}

Trending Topics