How much of a Sales Page do you read?

89 replies
Question is in the title.

Also...

I'm working on a product launch in the next month.

Right now I'm working on the sales page. The product is geared towards beginners in Internet Marketing.

Do you favor a short sales page that lays out what my product has to offer or a long one with the background story and all?
#page #read #sales
  • Profile picture of the author CurtisN
    If I'm your target audience, I'll read just about every word in your sales letter.

    If not, I'll either skim it for fun, or leave within 60 seconds.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matthew Iannotti
    I rarely read through a full salespage...However, audio video content catches my eyes better and gets my attention..
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    • Profile picture of the author N4PGW
      Originally Posted by EfitnessNYC View Post

      I rarely read through a full salespage...However, audio video content catches my eyes better and gets my attention..
      I like a good video, but I prefer to know how long they are in advance.

      I recently went to a site that had a product I wanted. I was ready to buy! 20 minutes later, I left because the timer had not released the buy link. Later, I left the video on and went elsewhere. An hour later it was just concluding and showed the price. By then, I didn't care anymore. They blew a $100 sale.

      Buck
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      • Profile picture of the author Matthew Iannotti
        Originally Posted by N4PGW View Post

        I like a good video, but I prefer to know how long they are in advance.

        I recently went to a site that had a product I wanted. I was ready to buy! 20 minutes later, I left because the timer had not released the buy link. Later, I left the video on and went elsewhere. An hour later it was just concluding and showed the price. By then, I didn't care anymore. They blew a $100 sale.

        Buck

        Now that is what you call shooting yourself in the foot..

        What a terrible idea that is, everyone has a different personality and a seller should realize they must cater to all. Some folks will sit through a long vid and than buy, some (like yourself) will not and get turned off as you did...

        Its never a good idea to hide a buy it now link...
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        • Profile picture of the author N4PGW
          Originally Posted by EfitnessNYC View Post

          Now that is what you call shooting yourself in the foot..

          What a terrible idea that is, everyone has a different personality and a seller should realize they must cater to all. Some folks will sit through a long vid and than buy, some (like yourself) will not and get turned off as you did...

          Its never a good idea to hide a buy it now link...
          Alex Malave has a site where at the bottom of the video is a notice that the video is 8 minutes long. Then he has a video that is not as boring as others. I get tired of wading through someone brag about the house their income bought. Tell me once, not twelve times... I can handle long videos that teach you something in the process -- if I am interested. It is when there is no known length to a video and it is a long brag-session or hype or fluff about a product that tells me nothing of what it can do for me that I leave.

          In the case of the training course I was interested in, because I didn't know how long it was, I could just as easily have quit just seconds before they told me how to buy. It turns out that I didn't.

          Buck
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    • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
      Originally Posted by EfitnessNYC View Post

      I rarely read through a full salespage...However, audio video content catches my eyes better and gets my attention..
      I agree with EfitnessNYC. Video gets my attention, long sales copy doesn't cut it.

      Ryan Biddulph
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  • Profile picture of the author Paul Hancox
    It depends on how INTERESTED I am in what you have to say, and how RELEVANT it is to me.

    I'm also aware that what people SAY, and what people DO are often very different, which is why you'd be better off split testing, and seeing which version pulls best for your audience.

    When I worked in direct sales, if someone asked my potential customers whether they would sit through a 2-3 hour presentation and then end up signing a contract worth $2,000 - $10,000 ... very few if ANY would say Yes.

    Yet that is what about 40% ended up doing.

    Don't rely simply on what your potential customers say they prefer ... put it to the ultimate test... the split test
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  • Profile picture of the author williamrs
    I watch some videos, read the bullets and subheadlines, try to identify the main features of the product, etc... I don't lose my time going through all the hype. I just try to figure out if the product can be useful for me or not. If the answer is yes I then give it a try.


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  • Profile picture of the author Lou Diamond
    Hello,
    I like sales pages that does a recap at the end or a strong bottom line, many people will forget what they read at the start of a sales page.
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    • Profile picture of the author NicheMayhem
      Have to know your audience. As a semi-experienced marketer, I have gotten to the point where I simply skim through for three things, what it is, what are the benefits for me and what is the price. Truthfully, the more hype I read the more I understand how much the seller is reaching and the less interest I have in buying.

      If your audience is desperate buyers though the entire scenario changes, if I have a need for a product and am deciding between two products or more, I will read the whole thing. But, still the way it ends up is figuring out that same what it is, what are the benefits, and what is the price.

      In my opinion, great sales letters spell out the big three very clear and do not attempt to insult my intelligence by tickling my fancy. The question still is, am I your audience? That's what you need to focus on, who you intend to sell the product to.
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  • Profile picture of the author Pete Egeler
    I NEVER read through a long sales letter. After the first couple of paragraphs, you're into the BS factor 90% of the time.

    I especially like those that start by telling you how poor they were, now they're rich and want to help out their fellow man.. For a mere $199-$499. Sure.

    Audio, video? Nope. Most people don't know when to stop.

    Pete
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    • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
      I read the start of it. Then I skip to the price. If it's more than I'm willing to pay, I'm out of there. If it's a reasonable price, then I'll scroll back up at the top and read it all the way through to see if it's something I'm really interested in. Then, unless the price is super low, I'll read through it again to make sure it's really something I think would be useful for me and read through looking for any clues that might show it to be otherwise.
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      • Profile picture of the author mcmahanusa
        Originally Posted by Dan C. Rinnert View Post

        I read the start of it. Then I skip to the price. If it's more than I'm willing to pay, I'm out of there. If it's a reasonable price, then I'll scroll back up at the top and read it all the way through to see if it's something I'm really interested in. Then, unless the price is super low, I'll read through it again to make sure it's really something I think would be useful for me and read through looking for any clues that might show it to be otherwise.

        That's precisely the way I do it. I really don't have time to read a long-winded sales letter. I feel the same way about an overly long sales video. My message to the people who send out these overly long letters and videos, "Get my attention. Get to the point. Get my money (if it's something I truly want and need)."
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      • Profile picture of the author teleam
        Originally Posted by Dan C. Rinnert View Post

        I read the start of it. Then I skip to the price. If it's more than I'm willing to pay, I'm out of there. If it's a reasonable price, then I'll scroll back up at the top and read it all the way through to see if it's something I'm really interested in. Then, unless the price is super low, I'll read through it again to make sure it's really something I think would be useful for me and read through looking for any clues that might show it to be otherwise.
        Same here. I also noticed the longer the sales presentation the higher the price.
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  • Profile picture of the author N4PGW
    I prefer the short page. Long pages are most often boring and too time consuming to read.

    If you prefer a long page, or a very long page, then keep people like me in mind. Summarize the product, its purpose, the problem(s) it solves, and give a link to the order box. Include the price AND membership price inside or near the box large enough to stand out.

    After the summary, a testimonial or two in a box before going into more detail about the product is fine. I don't care to hear people whining about their past or bragging about their assets. It's ok to mention them, but don't make it your theme. Box them up so I can scan past them and get to the details of the product quickly.

    I want to know what the product is, what problem it solves, and the real cost of the product. Don't tell me it is only $7.00 and then hide the fact that there is a $47/month charge after the third day. Just be up front and honest.

    Thanks for asking.

    Buck
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  • Profile picture of the author fredjr1978
    I usually just scroll down to the cost and if its to much I dont read any of it...If I can afford it, well I read more about it at that point.

    I dont know why people dont just put the price at the top haha.
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    • Profile picture of the author Robert Puddy
      Originally Posted by fredjr1978 View Post

      I usually just scroll down to the cost and if its to much I dont read any of it...If I can afford it, well I read more about it at that point.

      I dont know why people dont just put the price at the top haha.
      Because they know thats what most people are going to do and they want you to scroll down past the bolded parts one of which may catch your eye

      And below the price they can put the ps's which should be the biggest benefits again to catch your eye and drag you further into the sales letter

      If when you reach that part of the sales letter your still interested 2 things will occur either you will buy right there or you go back to the top and skim for more info

      The whole sales letter is not aimed at you, its aim is to provide explanations for all possible objections that mey be in the prospects mind.

      As a prospect you will skim for the relevant info for your possible objection

      Robert
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  • Profile picture of the author N4PGW
    On the subject of long videos, I want to say that there are quite a few I enjoyed. The entire video was teaching about my interest in order to build up to the product. In these cases, the product saved the time required to manually perform the steps described.

    This is a case of win-win. For watching a 20-60 minute video, I learned something I could take with me whether or not I bought the product. In a few cases, I bookmarked the site and went back to buy the product later. Others, I never returned to, but got good notes.

    Zig Ziglar says that many sales people spend five minutes talking a prospect into a sale and the next twenty minutes talking them out of the sale.

    If you sell by video, you might want to do a test. Briefly hit the big three and popup a buy button. Change the button when you hit different points in the video to see where most people buy. I'll bet the buy button at the end of a 20 minute video never gets clicked!

    Buck
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    • Profile picture of the author Rashell
      I think it would depend. When I was "new" new, I used to read the long sales copy & watch the videos to the end. Now, I'm still a beginner but, I skim to the point where I'm off the page in under 1 minute.

      Those videos that don't let you fast foward I give about 1 minute too. If tbe purpose isn't made by then... I'm off. If I can fast forward I'll wait for it to download and move forward at clips.

      Interestingly, I'll still read whole sales copy if it's on a blog (ie copyblogger) style format rather than a 1pg squeeze type sales page.

      Rashell
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  • Profile picture of the author MassiveMarketer
    If I'm really looking for a product/service you are offering, definitely I'd be reading a long sales page. If I'm just browsing or saw your site randomly, I might go for a short one with visuals like a video or short slide show of your product/service.

    A short one but very interesting that customers would want to know more.
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Morgan
    Originally Posted by reynoldscorb View Post

    Question is in the title.

    Also...

    I'm working on a product launch in the next month.

    Right now I'm working on the sales page. The product is geared towards beginners in Internet Marketing.

    Do you favor a short sales page that lays out what my product has to offer or a long one with the background story and all?
    If im interested in the product and a targetted customer, and it is a long one then I would read it all.
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  • Profile picture of the author sparkingproducts
    video is definitely the way to go! A short letter with a video at the top.
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  • Profile picture of the author CurtisN
    Keep in mind that it's the group preference that matters, not the individual. Therefore, while it's alright to ask individuals for opinions, it's much better to do testing to determine what the market wants.

    Long form sales letters work, so do short ones, as do video sales letters, and also video + text. But there are always ways to improve your conversions, so there isn't a "best way".
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    • Profile picture of the author N4PGW
      Originally Posted by CurtisN View Post

      Keep in mind that it's the group preference that matters, not the individual. Therefore, while it's alright to ask individuals for opinions, it's much better to do testing to determine what the market wants.

      Long form sales letters work, so do short ones, as do video sales letters, and also video + text. But there are always ways to improve your conversions, so there isn't a "best way".
      I have been seeing a number of very long sales pages with periodic "Buy now" type buttons. When I click on them, they take me to a box at the bottom of the page where the price and pay button are.

      So if you want a long sales page do something like this:

      Headline: Make $10,000 per day with a set-and-forget website using my Rocket-Science-Software-Tool!

      Then briefly describe it: With this tool, your website will force Google and other search engines to place your site at the number 1 position. It compels every visitor to click the buy button and to refer at least 20 friends.

      Button to buy now goes here.

      Now detail the product: My software interacts with google Bot to give it all the information it needs to think your website deserves top billing. It reads the minds of visitors and sends telepathic pictures of their fondest dreams to draw them to the buy button. Then it triggers their excitement node in their minds to make them want to tell all their friends. It charges them according to what they have available in their finances. If they have no money, it picks their brains until it finds their friends who do have the money and automatically formats an email like their friend would write and sends it to them. ...

      Another go to buy.

      Now give testamonials: WOW, i don't know why i spent the money I was taking to my bankruptcy lawyer, but since i added the program to one site, I have paid all my back debts and bought over a million dollars worth of products from this one internet marketer alone. I even buy my own product when I check out my site. This really works!

      Then the actual pay box.

      Don't enter a thing, just look at your cc and look at this button. Thank you for buying. Now add this to all your sites and don't forget a backlink to this page.


      Well, you can customize it to your own product if you like.

      Buck
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  • Profile picture of the author efwebm
    I read the title and most of what is above a fold. Then I give a big sigh as I scroll through pages of testimonials and graphs that I figure are mostly fabricated anyway until I get down to the price. If the price is right, I'll usually scroll back up and try to figure out exactly what I'm buying. If I can't figure it out by scanning, I usually give up and leave. Some sites are too vague because they don't want to give away all their secrets and don't leave enough clues to even know what it is.
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  • Profile picture of the author Marhelper
    It has to grab me very quickly. I usually look at bold/red text and scroll to price, etc...
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  • Profile picture of the author E. Brian Rose
    I read until I am turned off. If I get to the end, then I would probably buy, but I don't think that I have gotten to the end of a sales letter since 2003.

    Oh ya, good video keeps my attention longer.
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  • Profile picture of the author sodette1
    This argument has been going on for more years than I've
    been a copywriter. "Long copy or Short copy?"

    Now, It's "Long copy or video Short copy or Video or Long video
    and Short copy or Short copy and Long video with bullets or not
    with bullets with music or no music, auto-play or no auto-play..."

    ARGH!!!!

    Truth is... everything is relative. If it's expensive or your audience
    is discerning or doubtful - better give them ALL of the details. If its
    a $7 e-book - a 20 page salesletter's gonna make you look a little
    desperate - uhm - a LOT desperate.

    Different markets require more data also... selling to engineers in the
    B2B world? Better have your data. If you're selling Silly-Bands on a
    Kids website - short, emotionally charged is more than good enough.

    One big rule of thumb is... DO NOT bore your audience. I've made
    that mistake more times than I care to admit (I can get long winded now!).

    What copy works best? Just right. I like to think of this as the
    Three Bears version... not too long, not to short... just right.

    But - it's all relative.

    Here are some other keys to making more sales, in no specific order:

    * Know your audience - intimately.

    Not just their niche, but THEM, personally - are they mostly married
    or single? Younger or older? Affluent or blue-collar? Do they have a leather
    sofa or a cloth sofa? Own or rent a house? Drive a used car or new?
    have kids? How many on average? What other things do they buy/are
    they interested in? Religeon? Politics? What do they think about..."X"?
    etc, etc, etc.

    * Does your audience know you?

    If they don't - not a problem, unless you pretend they do. How do you
    address this? Credibility? Believability? Facts and figures? Proof? How?

    One of the reasons Product Launches (done well) are so successful, is
    because they allow you to prove value, show empathy, identify with
    your audience and - allow them to identify with you.

    * Show you understand your audience by building value that THEY can identify with.

    Good launches also allow you to build value... BUILD value... BUILD VALUE -
    In the minds of your audience. Not sell. The selling is so much more subtle.
    It's also at the right time in the sales process... If you follow the steps
    of good salescopy - whether in writing or video - your audience will be
    drooling by the time the "order now" button shows.

    Most of the time "Drooling" isn't really where they are, but if you've
    built enough value, added some believable scarcity and urgency (not fake),
    created some emotional pull... reversed some risk, etc. - the actual
    need for SELLING goes way down.

    What's a product launch done well? A "Sideways salesletter" as Jeff Walker
    says - it's just a salesletter. Can you do these things in your sales copy?
    Yup.

    Few more....

    * Put your product in front of the RIGHT target audience.

    One of the comments that repeats above is that folks who ARE
    interested in what you have, will read long copy - they will watch a
    long video.

    Of course they'll leave if, on initial glance, what you have does not
    look like what they expected or does not interest them.

    Making sure you attract the correct target market is so critical and
    often overlooked - the best copywriter in the world is not going to
    convert a high-horse, southern debutant, good-ole boy's wife, Christian
    woman who accidentally lands on your "vote for beastiality" website.
    Sorry, even John Carlton himself "aint" that good.

    Short copy/long copy, video/no video,etc. doesn't matter if
    you got the wrong people in front of your product.
    Again, that's like trying to sell 100% Angus Beef Steaks -
    for 50% of normal cost - Grain Fed - to a group of Vegan
    Environmentalist Wickans - good luck.

    I made that last point twice because it really puts rug burns
    on my butt when clients say "Those 1 million visitors I purchased from
    the guy in Quadelahara on the black market didn't give me one
    sale - your copy must be really bad..." Duh. I mean really - DUH.

    *Create an experience, immerse your market, engage them.

    Stories are great for this. In fact, stories are one of Vin Montello's
    (Very solid copywriter) uses to create huge windfalls for his clients,
    he tells the story about the time he... GOTCHA! lol.

    Try to get the senses involved. Do you know that people think in
    pictures, not words? Yup. If I tell you the e-book is about getting
    dates, for instance, it brings up a visual for you - maybe - but if I
    paint a mental picture for you "this e-guide is like a silent partner
    sitting right next to you in the smokey night club, helping you to
    be more confident, giving you courage, making you the kind of
    guy that beautiful blond at the end of the bar with her glass of
    red wine notices... blah, blah, blah. Not a great example, but
    it does put a picture YOU CONTROL in their minds.

    * Tell the truth - be sincere.

    These should go without saying.

    The job of good copy is NOT to manipulate someone who OTHERWISE
    WOULD NOT BUY to purchase your crap. It's to present your products
    or services in the best possible light for the intended audience - using
    triggers and NLP and other very cool tools, yes, but - if you use
    hype or manipulate them marketing methods to get people to buy
    your "stuff" in todays more educated markets or niches - you better be
    VERY, VERY good at it. People can sniff that BS from a mile away.

    * Ask for the sale - at the right time.

    Do ask... but not before you've got them engaged and desiring or
    wanting what you are offering.

    I see this too often too... build value - then share the investment (not PRICE).

    Even skimmers will see some bullets or sub-titles on the way down to the
    price... at least do that much. If not, you may as well just put your
    price at the top of the page or the beginning of your video - same thing.

    Video - converts better IF...

    Done well.
    Thought out like good copy.
    It's in the right market.
    It's not boring.
    You use NLP and Triggers
    You use risk reversal
    You build value
    You discuss features and benefits (yes, features also)
    You ASK FOR THE SALE or Call to Action - specifically
    IT'S NOT BORING.. (again)...

    Frankly, some people have no business doing videos themselves.
    Sorry - not everyone is cut out for it.

    By the way.. that list sound familiar? Should.. it's the same list
    I'd give for good salesletters too.

    Finally - remember that the copy still controls both video and
    print salesletters. It's just a different medium.

    Do either one of them poorly and your results will reflect it.

    Say enough... of the right things... to the correct audience.. the
    best way for them - then be quiet. It either worked or it didn't.

    Thats how long it should be.
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    • Profile picture of the author N4PGW
      Originally Posted by sodette1 View Post


      Truth is... everything is relative. If it's expensive or your audience
      is discerning or doubtful - better give them ALL of the details. If its
      a $7 e-book - a 20 page salesletter's gonna make you look a little
      desperate - uhm - a LOT desperate.
      I have had the wind knocked out of me after following a terribly long sales letter to see they are offering a $7 product. It makes me think it was a product that sold for hundreds more than it was worth five years ago and now is dumped because it is still obsolete. I lose interest and don't buy.

      I guess price vs length makes a difference, even to me, and I didn't realize it until just now thinking about it.


      One big rule of thumb is... DO NOT bore your audience. I've made
      that mistake more times than I care to admit (I can get long winded now!).
      There it is! Keep the attention of your prospective audience and you will most likely make the sale.

      As was mentioned before, What is in it? What can it do for me? How much does it cost? Where is the Buy button?


      Buck
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  • Profile picture of the author Brandon Ellis
    I like long sales pages visually, but I never read the whole thing. Very rarely actually. But I scan through it and see if something captures my eye. I think that can be powerful. Actually putting different elements in your copy that captures different emotions. Different Strokes for Different Folks.

    Good luck with the launch!

    B
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  • Profile picture of the author dem0x7
    This may be weird, but if the sales page is well designed with great graphics and a nice clean look to it, then I scroll down very slowly skimming through everything.

    If it's a poor design or just the same generic sales page, I skip to the bottom to see the price and go from there.
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  • Profile picture of the author IM Listing
    I read only the headings and look for the videos..
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  • Profile picture of the author Thomas Michal
    I read the bullet points and the price thats about it.
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  • Profile picture of the author jasonl70
    Make it as long as it takes to get the job done. You need to anticipate every possible question and objection your buyer may have, and address it.

    The problem isn't with long sales letters - the problem is with boring sales letters.

    I strongly suggest people read "ultimate sales letters" by Dan Kenendy.
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  • Profile picture of the author ryjo
    I would do a shorter page but have two or three testimonials in video form....make sure the people look credible. Have them feel comfortable to give you their info so set up a 2 page cpa that way with partials you can call them up on a sales floor after.
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    • Profile picture of the author jaystar
      No matter what the product, I prefer a short sales page. I mostly ignore testimonials and income claims. I might check out the bonuses. I read the bullet list of features, look at any demos or sneak peaks, and scroll down to the price.
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  • Profile picture of the author Victoralexon
    The more interested I am, the more I will read.
    The more I'm looking for a particular solution to my problem, the more I will read.
    If it's an internet marketer that I have a lot of trust for, then I skim or skip parts of the sales page.
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  • Profile picture of the author srumsley
    When I was newer, I read every sales page right through. Now, I don't waste my time. If the scroll tab at the top is tiny (meaning a long sales letter), I normally exit straight away.
    Also I cannot stand audio videos that start playing without me pushing the button to indicate that I want to play the video. I am so annoyed by that that I will leave immediately. That would be like me walking into a shop only to have the salesman start yelling his sales pitch at me the instant I put my head in the door.
    Recently I DID read through what turned out to be a long, interesting sales page with video, BECAUSE it was broken up into many short pages with a 'click to continue' link at the bottom.
    Good idea.
    I also have noticed the longer the sales page the higher the price. And ONE exit-grab / upsell / OTO is okay, but 3 or 4 or more? I would leave out of principle: if that's how this person is going to treat his customers, then I don't want to be one.

    Just my opinion.

    Some prefer video, but I'm a fast reader. I only want video when I need to see how to install, or exactly how it works on screen etc.

    Sue
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Grant
    First paragraph, then I scroll until I find pictures or a video demo, then price.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Tan
    I read the first headline and then I hunt up and down for clues on what the product has to offer, more importantly, how is it unique. Then I search for proofs and testimonials. Video usually helps in telling me more if they do a demo or showaround, but if it's just splash-type I will hit stop.

    Basically, in this current world 2.0, I find myself buying a product not because of a salespage, but recommendations from other people or close friends and associates, when they say it is good, even it has a crappy sales page, I still purchase. If there is no news from the marketplace on that product, even if they have the best copywriter, I still hold on to my purchase, but that's just my style.

    I think other than the salespage, reputation management is very important, this comes naturally when you overdeliver.

    Good luck on your launch!

    Daniel
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  • Profile picture of the author Online Bliss
    I like a good video, but I prefer to know how long they are in advance.
    Some have nothing but a Video.
    with hardly a headline even.
    Something quick that will let me know
    what the basic video content is about would be nice.
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  • Profile picture of the author tess47
    Definitely short! Any time I come upon one of those mile-long sales pages, it automatically turns me off. Many people don't have the time to sit and read a sales page for 30 minutes.

    If I do come across one that looks particularly interesting but is longer than I have time for, I will ready the very beginning, skip down to the highlights or bulleted points, skip down to the price. That's it.

    No long sales pages for me, keep it short and to the point. Just MHO
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  • I start at the top, read quickly for interest.

    Then scroll to the bottom, check the cost.

    After after that, I will read pretty much the whole page before deciding.

    Best regards ... Ron
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  • Profile picture of the author GarryMSayer
    Headline, sub-headlines and bullets. In that order.

    If I like what I read I'll then scroll down to the price. If I think it represents good value then I'll completely read the sales letter from top to bottom.

    I rarely buy straight away so I'll bookmark the site, come back to it tomorrow and read it again with fresh eyes.

    If I'm still interested I'll likely buy (or swipe the best bits!).

    Garry.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jesus Perez
    I read the major headlines.

    Then, if it's a software product, I try to find that one, hidden paragraph that actually explains what the product does.

    Then, I go through testimonials to see if my BS meter goes off.
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  • Profile picture of the author ivanadee
    the major headlines...
    and attractive pic.
    that's it
    ^_^
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  • Profile picture of the author Jimmy Reilly
    I never read as full sales letter, I read the headline, the bullets, then scroll to the price.

    However once i a while I find a sales letter that is actually informative and teaches me something. Those are the letters I read in full and probably have a better chance of buying.
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  • Profile picture of the author sbucciarel
    Banned
    If I'm on your sales page at all, it's because I am already interested in the product. I then go immediately down to the price. If the price isn't within the range I'm willing to pay, I leave. If it is, I go to the bullet points of what is included in the product and the benefits. I rarely ever read the whole thing and I completely ignore testimonials because it's my belief that most of them are fake. I also ignore any urgency messages. Urgency is a crock and just intended to force someone to make a snap judgement.
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  • Profile picture of the author wealthwind
    First of all I want to understand WHAT IT IS indeed. Then I want to know HOW MUCH IS IT.
    If price is OK with me then:
    I read the sub-headlines, bullets, try to watch some videos and try to understand the main features of the product.
    I don't read all the hype one mile long (and usually it is a hype).
    I scroll testimonials to see if somebody I know has to say any good word. But anyway testimonials usually aren't unbiased -
    so don't have much value and soc. proof.

    Overall I prefer SHORT straight to the point sales page. If I need this product, I don't need to hear from seller how good it is,
    I just want to know what it can do for me.
    How good it is I will verify on forum here or anywhere else.

    Note: Maybe this doesn't work for newbies because they buy on emotions and this is what ordinary Sales page is about...
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  • Reynold,

    My advice is to ignore all of the above replies.

    Marketers know that asking prospects what they prefer
    is usually not the best gauge for deciding on what to give them
    .

    Quick example. When we surveyed our house list asking what price they'd pay
    for a certain new product, most said they'd pay as much as $19.95
    However during split testing we discovered that most would pay $47.
    More than double.

    We survey all the time and I can give countless other examples.
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    • Profile picture of the author dmpeterson
      If I am interested in the product, I will usually read the first few paragraphs and then jump to the bottom for the price. If it is too expensive I leave but if it is affordable I return to where I left off and continue reading.
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      • Profile picture of the author keniskandar
        the moment i know its a "sales" page, i automatically look for whats in offer. If its relevant to what i want, i would read on to see whether i can believe this offer to be true. If i dont, or its not relevant, i would just leave even before scrolling down to the price point.
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  • Originally Posted by reynoldscorb View Post


    Right now I'm working on the sales page. ....

    Do you favor a short sales page that lays out what my product has to offer
    or a long one with the background story and all?
    The answer to your main question is LONG copy. Frikin long.
    1. Virtually every guru uses extremely long salescopy. (or long video)

    2. Some of the above Warrior comments state they won't read long copy.
      But in reality, if the long salescopy is well written, and targeted,
      those warriors DO read it.

    3. There have been tests that follow people's eyes as they examine a
      physical mailing piece or a webpage. It goes something like this...
      (out of memory and may not be 100% accurate...) First they read the headline,
      next the first few words of the salescopy, next they jump down to the P.S.,
      next they look for the price... then they go back up to the top and read the letter.

    4. The first time I hired a copywriter to write salescopy for a direct mail piece,
      I had this experience. (this was for a physical mailing)
      He handed me the finished salesletter. To my surprise it was 3 pages long.
      I read it then and there. It was awesome, and I hung on to every word
      and felt as if it put me in the purchasing mode. When I finished reading it,
      he asked me what I thought. I told him I loved it, but it was kinda long.
      Then he asked me whether I read the entire letter, and I replied Yes.
      (and I was surprised by my own answer)
      So it didn't matter that it was long--because I still read it.

      Over the next few days I had others read the 3-page salesletter.
      First, my html programmer. I asked her what she thought.
      She said it was awesome, but long. Then I asked whether she read the whole thing,
      and her answer was Yes. In fact everyone who checked it out for me
      said it was excellent, but long, and then admitted that they read every word of it.


      So, when surveyed prospects say they prefer short sales letters
      (which do not give copywriters the opportunity to use necessary techniques)
      I take it with a grain of salt. Prospects only think they know what they want.
      But marketers know what we need, and that is... frickin long copy.
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  • Profile picture of the author Cris Cato
    Honestly, I do not even read the sales page. The first thing I do is scroll down and see how much the product is selling for. Then, I would close the page down just to see if they offer a discount, which 95% of the time they do. Nowadays, there's so much upsells and downsells with these internet marketers it's not even funny. It can get downright annoying sometimes.

    I hate long sales pages because half the time it's all BS. It always starts off with a "sad" story and how all of a sudden they found the "secret" formula and started making money right away.

    I know affiliate marketing takes time so if you're going to sell a product that will make people money quickly, easily and on "autopilot" then I'm a little cautious of that product. Sales pages does not make me buy a product. Research and word of mouth from other people that says they've had success with a particular products are the products I take a closer look at.

    Keep them short and to the point. That's very rare but I have seen them in the past.
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  • Profile picture of the author abednego
    Originally Posted by reynoldscorb View Post

    Question is in the title.

    Also...

    I'm working on a product launch in the next month.

    Right now I'm working on the sales page. The product is geared towards beginners in Internet Marketing.

    Do you favor a short sales page that lays out what my product has to offer or a long one with the background story and all?
    Exaggerated income claims make me stop reading instantly ...
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  • Profile picture of the author John Wilkes
    Hey, the point your missing is, whether it is a short sales page that gets over the point quickly or a long envolved salespage, if it is well written and engaging people will read it all the way through. Each salespage is as different as the product it is selling. Guess what, if people are skipping straight to the bottom for the price, then the copy could do with some improvement.

    There are also pycho-factors as well, so the sales page cannot be "static" and should be constantly evolving and systems put in place so it can be tested and evaluated. Check out abtests.com & whichtestwon.com.

    hope this helps
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  • Profile picture of the author InternetM39482
    Even if I'm *very* interested in a product, I don't usually read the whole sales page, word-by-word. Like, the other day, I was interested in buying Bookmarking Demon... I skimmed through the sales page, checked a couple review on a couple forums and bought it.

    The only sales letters I've read in full were Paul Myers' Empires and Video Boss' final sales video (okay, it wasn't a sales letter technically). In fact, I read the Empires sales letter after I'd bought the product.

    But hey, maybe that's just me.
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  • Profile picture of the author N4PGW
    I want to add, the when a product has caught my attention in the beginning, I look for valuable/usable information in the content. When I see something that makes me say "I think I can do that, or I see how that is helpful." I tend to think hard about the product before not clicking the buy button. In at least one case, I spent two weeks researching the product more until I scraped enough money together to afford the product. Then I bought it.

    Buck
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  • Profile picture of the author peterj
    I like to skim first to get the gist of it, then check out the price.

    If I'm willing to pay that price I will give it a deeper skim and then I will will bookmark it so that I can come back to it later.

    Skimming helps to filter out the BS, bookmarking it means I ain't gonna make any hasty decision.

    I really hate those video sales pages where there are no control buttons, no inkling as to how long the video is and absolutely nothing else on the page. . . . Don't waste my time!
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  • Profile picture of the author sodette1
    Wow... I mean W-O-W.

    This thread is very interesting... and not a little disturbing, to
    be honest.

    In all of my own testing long copy, well written, has almost always
    outpulled short.

    I say almost, because that rule doesn't hold true for lower priced items,
    around the $27 and below mark.

    To me, long copy is like being prepared for the date. You bring flowers, but
    you also have a card, chocolates, a stuffed animal, enough money to go to
    the movies AND dinner, just in case, more than one CD, multiple contingency
    plans, etc.

    Short copy assumes that you know the ONE reason that everyone is buying
    and only has time to build on that one thing - you better get it right.

    If your customers are going to the price before you get an opportunity to
    show them the value, your copy did not do the job.

    If your customers stay or go because of the price, without even considering
    your value play, your copy did not do the job.

    If you are planning your future success based on how well your products
    price compares to the competitors - you are not doing your job.

    Maybe as marketers you skip everything and shoot to the price, but I'd
    be very cautious about using this information to plan your own salesletters.

    What you like and what you do as marketers has very little bearing on what
    your customers are like and what they will do as consumers.

    And, as I stated before - go ahead - try to sell an engineer in the B2B market
    without all of the details or try to convince a financial market mogul with a short
    message and you'll find yourself short on cash at the end of the month, in my
    experience.

    Price before value - never a good model. Competing in the market on price not
    value - never a good model. Using short copy when long is needed - never a good
    model.

    Cover all of your bases, remember - each person who visits your site is there
    for a different reason. If you don't push their button or if you only push one button
    and it's not theirs, you will pay the price for being lazy or assuming short copy
    actually converts better.

    Wow... very interesting thread indeed.
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    • Originally Posted by sodette1 View Post

      In all of my own testing long copy, well written, has almost always
      outpulled short.

      I say almost, because that rule doesn't hold true for lower priced items,
      around the $27 and below mark.
      @sodette1:

      If your tests show that short copy wins for $27 products,
      then with all due respect the long copy you tried
      was not effective salescopy.

      .. > around the $27 and below mark.

      Nope. Long copy outpulls short copy even for $27, $17 and even free products.
      As a matter of fact some power gurus have taken the time to setup
      long copy webpages to capture ezine subscribers.
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      • Profile picture of the author sodette1
        Originally Posted by White Dove Creative View Post

        @sodette1:

        If your tests show that short copy wins for $27 products,
        then with all due respect the long copy you tried
        was not effective salescopy.

        .. > around the $27 and below mark.

        Nope. Long copy outpulls short copy even for $27, $17 and even free products.
        As a matter of fact some power gurus have taken the time to setup
        long copy webpages to capture ezine subscribers.
        Careful about being dogmatic and stating as a fact something
        that is as subjective as this topic.

        I've been copywriting full time for about three years - well, not
        including my own copy for my own sites.

        And, although I've personally always leaned toward long copy for
        everything (as you can tell by my posts - I'm kinda' a believer in
        saying as much as needs saying, hopefully, not too much more
        than that), times change and markets are not all the same.

        Today, I think one of the biggest mistakes a lot of marketers
        make is trying to sell on the first exposure. Long copy or short
        copy - not even the issue.

        Product launches work so well because they allow you to
        cover everything your audience needs - talk about a LONG
        copy sales process. Four videos, average 10-30 minutes each...
        now that is long copy.

        Here are a few other factors to consider that might taint
        your argument that long copy is ALWAYS better:

        1. An audience that is familiar with you already and trusts you,
        doesn't need a long, drawn out, even well written sales message.
        In fact - if your friend says to you "Dude, go here and get this
        now - don't ask questions, just do it. We can discuss it this
        afternoon when I come over for beer - you're gonna love this!"
        Chances are - it's enough.

        So - #1 - audience trust and familiarity are a factor.

        2. Don't know where you are getting your information at,
        but a long squeeze page or opt-in page is not only a bad
        idea, it's possibly costing you optins.

        Here's the thing... if you are trying to impress visitors by
        overwhelming them with your wit and knowledge on your
        optin page, you miss the point. An optin page has one call
        to action - get the email address, the optin.

        What in heavens name could you possibly be saying in long
        copy to accomplish that better than a great ethical bribe
        report or video or free session or coupon or ?? whatever?

        Also, a squeeze page is a filter - to get to the point and
        get the right people to follow you and optin. It's not to
        convince more people to optin if they are not interested.

        Could say more about this - but in my experience, unless
        your optin page is like a launch video in a series, which can be long,
        and the optin is to get people to request notification for the next
        video in the series - or something specific like that. Long copy
        on a general site squeeze page will likely cost you.

        3. If we talk about off-line products - long copy may not be
        needed at all - the smells of the food, the free sample on a
        toothpick and I'm sold. If she wiggles just right and says to
        me "I want you, now." - Not much more needed.

        So... the more senses that can be engaged, the less absolute
        the rule about saying more or selling more or telling more.
        Sometimes less is enough.

        Also - as disturbed as I am by it, just read the comments in this
        thread and you'll find that if you are marketing to this crowd
        and you use long, boring copy - or even long great copy -
        apparently - if we are to believe that listening to our market
        is important - you'd lose sales.

        So... flexibility and testing are key. Not being stuck on a
        paradigm because the "greats" have said it.

        In past history, people were taught to bury their poop 6" below
        the surface - just because it was a good practice back then,
        doesn't mean it's the best practice today. Personally, I'll just flush.

        Video, live webinars, audio, power point, graphics or other visuals...
        all effect the written text or how much of it you need on the page.

        Plus, those other factors I've mentioned in my previous post...
        and a lot more actually.

        Imagine long copy for kids today who feel that "u r stpd 4 thkg
        i cn reed nythg lngr tn ths dmb crp" is a long text message
        and who's attention span last about as long as... err, uh,...

        ... "uhm, what was I saying again?"


        Finally - are you making your statement because you've got
        years of data and testing, or because it's your opinion? Do you
        have the empirical data to back your statement up?

        As a copywriter I need to be very careful about what I say
        because others take it seriously and use it in their own
        businesses. The last thing I want to do is give an absolute
        that could possibly be a subjective opinion and might have
        a negative impact on the results of others.

        Sure, I have opinions (I prefer long copy), but truth is,
        it isn't always an absolute for getting results. **heavy sigh**

        Just saying...
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        • @sodette1:

          Thanks for your awesome response. First I want to point out 2 things
          with regards to the majority of comments made to this thread:
          1. If you ask a magician which coin vanish method looks better,
            you're assuming that the performer will be doing the trick
            in front of a regular audience... not for an audience full of magicians,
            right?

            So, most everyone here who has commented "well I do/don't read long copy..."
            is in fact a marketer themself, who has wrongly assumed that the OP's question
            was regarding salescopy intended for other marketers. It was not!


            The OP's question was re salescopy delivered to a normal audience.
            Not to an audience to marketers.

          2. When average folks buy an ebook about, say, Dog Training,
            they don't read the ebook then immediately start writing their own ebook
            about dog training, proclaiming themselves as experts.

            But somehow, this crap goes on daily in IM. (internet marketing)
            People don't know a thing about IM, they buy a few IM ebooks
            then bam! they think they're an expert and they start writing their own
            how-to ebooks. Everyone here knows exactly what I'm talking about.

            Anways, because so many people are self-proclaimed, instant,
            overnight IM experts, who have no real experience (and are not
            making a full-time living at IM), I typically ignore the hoards
            of WF comments posted in these types of threads.

          So to summarize... (1) In this thread, most warriors have wrongly assumed
          that the OP was asking about salescopy targeted for fellow IM'ers; and
          (2) the majority of people making posts don't know jack.
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          • Originally Posted by sodette1 View Post

            Also, a squeeze page is a filter - to get to the point and
            get the right people to follow you and optin. It's not to
            convince more people to optin if they are not interested.
            You and I are talking about apples and oranges.
            Two entirely different things. I didn't say anything
            about using longcopy for squeezepages.

            In my example I was referring to long copy for a newsletter opt-in form,
            which is different than a squeeze page being used as a front end
            to
            the "real" webpage. (which is typically a salespage selling a single item)

            Often, squeeze pages include a small textlink allowing people to
            bypass the squeezepage without opting in. And very often people will
            type fake a email address into a squeeze page, in order to get to
            the "real" webpage behind the squeezepage.

            .. > A squeeze page is simply a front-end to the "real" webpage,
            .. > which is typically a salespage selling a single item.

            So for that reason, a squeezepage is different than a long copy webpage
            with the one and only goal of getting a new newsletter subscriber.


            [squeezepage (short copy)] --> [user opts in just to get a freebie] --> [user brought to a product salespage]

            [newsletter opt-in page (long copy)] --> [user opts in to newsletter] --> [newsletter owner is overjoyed]


            Originally Posted by sodette1 View Post

            Today, I think one of the biggest mistakes a lot of marketers
            make is trying to sell on the first exposure. Long copy or short
            copy - not even the issue.
            You've made some good points in your detailed reply.
            And they make sense in their own right. Sure, one can bring in
            bigger-picture factors. (such as the IM'ers own reputation and
            trust factor playing a role in the shortcopy/longcopy discussion)
            Two IM'ers and a doobie can lead to long, deep discussions
            about how external factors and the big picture affects
            shortcopy/longcopy response. But the OP has asked just a simple
            question. We're talking just simple black box, with no external influencers.
            And long copy beats short copy.

            Originally Posted by sodette1 View Post

            are you making your statement because you've got
            years of data and testing, or because it's your opinion?
            I started testing in the mid 1990's. And have done
            so much testing that I've achieved true marketing nerddom.
            We had college interns doing the marketing "grunt work"
            including managing ppc campaigns, placing ezine ads,
            and setting up campaigns and tracking/testing links.
            In fact at one point I went so far as have 5 unique tracking
            links in just one email message (of an autoresponder series)
            in order to determine just where in the textcopy people were clicking.
            (Nowadays I don't do much testing--when it comes to selecting
            a winning headline I just use my Magic 8-Ball or get my
            cleaning lady's opinion)


            @sodette1 I totally respect your opinion and thanks again for your
            well thought out comments.
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            • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
              Originally Posted by White Dove Creative View Post

              So to summarize... (1) In this thread, most warriors have wrongly assumed that the OP was asking about salescopy targeted for fellow IM'ers; and
              (2) the majority of people making posts don't know jack.
              While I agree wholeheartedly with point #2...

              How do you know that the OP was not asking about salescopy for IMers? I'm not trying to start an argument, but the original post makes no mention of the intended market, and the subject line is

              "How much of a Sales Page do you read?" [bolding mine]

              Unless you had some private communique with the OP, or your 8-ball or cleaning lady truly are psychic , you can't necessarily make the assumption you did.

              That said, even if the target market is "IMers", going by a relative handful of responses from people who cared enough about their opinions to voice them could be harmful to your wealth. The bottom line is figuring out what works with your product, your market and your traffic...
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  • Now a days, when I am looking to buy a product, I scan for explanatory videos. I know that 10-page text sales pitches kill my buying mood. I'd rather have a down to Earth and straight to the point video.
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  • Profile picture of the author Stuart S
    I'm a big video man, that said if its just a payment proof of the system I am turned off, also I must be able to see how long there is in the video and have the option to skip parts, I can't stand listening to crap let alone not knowing how long I have to listen before I find anything out.

    A bit of writing is ok but it needs to be concise and no b.s and just a few reviews is fine for me.
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  • Profile picture of the author nongnut36
    I personally get bored reading long sales letter. I think 1 or 2 pages is fine. And some of the rediculous prices they start off with does anybody believe that they are really going to pay what the quote at the beginning.
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  • Profile picture of the author thebitbotdotcom
    I usually just blow through it in a few seconds to see how it was designed. I have never bought anything sold by a sales page.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alfred Shelver
    Usually half a page and then I scroll down to the bottom if the price is reasonable I will read the rest if its out of my range I move along.

    Originally Posted by reynoldscorb View Post

    Question is in the title.

    Also...

    I'm working on a product launch in the next month.

    Right now I'm working on the sales page. The product is geared towards beginners in Internet Marketing.

    Do you favor a short sales page that lays out what my product has to offer or a long one with the background story and all?
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Originally Posted by reynoldscorb View Post

    Question is in the title.

    Also...

    I'm working on a product launch in the next month.

    Right now I'm working on the sales page. The product is geared towards beginners in Internet Marketing.

    Do you favor a short sales page that lays out what my product has to offer or a long one with the background story and all?
    Title question:

    It depends on which pass I'm on and how interested I am in the product.

    Generally, on the first pass, I read the headline and then skim through, scanning for sub-headlines, bullet lists and other things that catch my eye. I'm also looking for things that trip my BS meter.

    If the page makes it through the first scan and I'm still interested, I'll go back and read more carefully, maybe watch some video, ignore testimonials unless a name I know catches my eye.

    Second question:

    Yes.

    Because of that, I usually start by testing one against the other...
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  • Profile picture of the author THK
    I skim through it first. The bullet points, what is included in the product or service, any videos, the offer, guarantee, price etc. and if that pique my interest, I go back and read the whole thing.

    Tanvir
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  • Profile picture of the author ash2611
    I prefer short sales page, with concentrated and straight to the point benefits.
    For me, I do not like to read about long stories and how things were going too bad then suddenly everything had changed, along with pictures of wonderful beaches and fancy cars bla bla bla...That turns me off and gives me the impression that the sales letter trying so hard to convince me to buy something weak.
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    • .
      Analogy:

      Ask any kid if he prefers to go elementary school
      and high school for a total of 12 years,
      ...or.... just go to school for 6 months. Most will say 6 months.
      If we based our school system on what the surveyed kids say,
      we'd wind up with a society of idiots.
      People being surveyed do not always know what they want/need.

      This entire thread is flawed, by design.

      Many here are giving their opinion that they prefer short copy.
      (and who doesn't--most of us would rather read stuff that's shorter)

      But the length of salescopy that people prefer to read
      has zero relevance on the sell-thru / conversion ratio of the salescopy.

      So, when surveyed prospects say they prefer short sales letters
      (which do not give copywriters the opportunity to use necessary techniques)
      I take it with a grain of salt. Prospects only think they know what they want.
      But marketers know what we need, and that is... frickin long copy.
      Copywriters have a laundry list of items their salescopy must accomplish.
      The copy should get the reader to trust the product owner.
      The copy should answer every possible objection the reader might have.
      The copy should remove all risk.
      The copy should use social proof.
      The copy might use scarcity, NLP, or other techniques to increase conversions.

      So, while the reader says he prefers just a short list of bullet points,
      the marketer KNOWS what he really needs.... long salescopy,
      written by a skilled copywriter who knows how to get conversions.

      Originally Posted by ash2611 View Post

      I prefer short sales page, with concentrated and straight to the point benefits.
      Perfect example. This warrior likes to read short copy.
      Hey, we're all lazy by nature. Who doesn't prefer shorter copy.
      But to close the sale, this warrior should be reading long copy.
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  • Profile picture of the author N4PGW
    The trick here is to address the needs of the different personalities in your market. In the business environment, I like to keep my mind uncluttered. If you have something to offer, briefly tell me what it is you have and what it can do for me. If I want to know more, I'll ask. Once I understand, I make my decision or park it for further evaluation later. Verbally this is easy, but in a sales page, it is not.

    If the sales page can quickly tell me what it is and what it does, then I might recognize the benefit to me. However, if I don't, I will check out a bit more to see if it addresses something of need to me. If I don't see it, I am gone. Occasionally, when I see the value of the product such as a WSO where the first 50 sales are 1/2 price and I am still there, I read more closely to see if it is worth the time/money ratio.

    I am still at the point where I have to have a budget of what I can afford or not. If that is your market, price is very important. You can promise me all you want that I will make $1million in 60 days, but that will not add $25,000 to my budget. I would rather know that I cannot afford your service up front rather than waste my time. If you have a 40 minute video, let me know in advance. It is only fair. You would not want me to hold you up for an hour of your time while you are busy when I don't have any interest in you or your product.

    Long copy? I see a use for it, just keep in mind that there are some who don't want to wade thru it all.

    Of course, you are addressing one niche, the IM niche, a diverse group of individuals who come from all walks of life and philosophy. There are some you want and some you don't want. The entitlement mentality is basically hopeless. You won't satisfy them with free info. The unemployed, they won't have money to risk on a $2000 course or seminar, but they may squeeze a few dollars for something worth while. The lower-class employed may be spending too much time not earning enough to keep themselves fed and if they can afford to buy, can't take the time to work it. They need a quick fix. On the other hand, you have experienced marketers here who, if they think you know one point of SEO they don't, they will pay you $1000 just to get the point. I heard one marketer say he buys every popular system just to see if there is something in it he does not already know that can help him in what he is already doing. After all, how do you measure the costs of some of these courses when you make $1,000,000 per month? $1000 for a course is like spending money on a soda to me.

    Know your market, address their personalities and make your copy accordingly.

    ====edit====
    maybe that last line should have been first and last. Well, here's your long copy. LOL

    Good night
    Buck
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    • Originally Posted by N4PGW View Post

      I am still at the point where I have to have a budget of what I can afford or not. If that is your market, price is very important. You can promise me all you want that I will make $1million in 60 days, but that will not add $25,000 to my budget. I would rather know that I cannot afford your service up front rather than waste my time. If you have a 40 minute video, let me know in advance. It is only fair. You would not want me to hold you up for an hour of your time while you are busy when I don't have any interest in you or your product.
      Buck, with all due respect, this is another example where someone thinks
      they know what they want, but well written salescopy could prove otherwise.

      You're saying that for a product that will teach you how to make 1 million fungolas,
      you might pay a few bucks for it, but you wouldn't pay $25,000. Fair enough.

      But, you are wrong. Good salescopy could get you to pay $25k.
      Even if it's way beyond your budget. Even if you have to borrow
      money from friends and relatives in order to afford it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Fenshon
    I normally read the headline, teasers, bullet points, Ps and guarantee. Then go and check for reviews on forums before making a purchase.
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  • Profile picture of the author Wh1sky
    Title takes most attention. If title is not good i do not read body..
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  • Profile picture of the author zenji
    When I started out, I wasn't interested in long sales letters but would be happy to watch a video even though it would last say 15 minutes.
    Depends on the individual. Some of us hate reading

    Originally Posted by reynoldscorb View Post

    Question is in the title.

    Also...

    I'm working on a product launch in the next month.

    Right now I'm working on the sales page. The product is geared towards beginners in Internet Marketing.

    Do you favor a short sales page that lays out what my product has to offer or a long one with the background story and all?
    Signature

    Please do not use affiliate links in signatures

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  • Profile picture of the author Aira Bongco
    I have a habit of skipping around but I stop by the images and testimonials, then I check out the price.
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  • Profile picture of the author WillBeRich
    I just read the first few words. If there's a video I may watch it but I hate the "new" trend with videos that doesn't have stop/pause buttons, usually I just get annoyed and close down the page.
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  • Profile picture of the author wcmylife
    Hi Reynold,

    You have some interesting comments from fellow warriors. Here's my advice. Do your squeeze page - keep tab on the conversions. If you have the money, do a Hypnotic Sales Page and then compare your conversions. Here's two things that completely floor me with Internet Marketers

    a. They think they can wear multiple hats - sales copywriter, traffic assistant, product development, social media manager, affiliate commissioner - you name it. Do what your EXCEPTIONAL at - outsource the rest to quality folk.

    b. They NEVER TEST. They put up a sales page for 6 months and wonder why it's not converting. TEST TEST TEST. My mentor Joe Vitale tells a story where he sent his list to a sales page and made about 100 sales in 6 months, changed up the sales page to a Hypnotic Sales Page (product/cost the same) and sent the same list and did 100 sales in 1 month.

    Hope this video helps you

    YouTube - Hypnotic Sales Pages Triple ClickBank Conversions
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by airabongco View Post

      I have a habit of skipping around but I stop by the images and testimonials, then I check out the price.
      I tend to skip around, too. But unless a name or face jumps out at me, I ignore testimonials. I know that, at best, they represent the best case scenario. At worst, they're blatant lies.

      Most amateur copywriters (and I still count myself an amateur because I write copy only for myself) have no idea how to compose a persuasive testimonial. So you get long strings of meaningless blather that comes off sounding like "I bought Joe Blow's product and my (traffic, sales, income...) tripled even before I got around to reading it..."
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  • Profile picture of the author Kezz
    For every product I've actually bought from a sales page I've read every single word.

    I have a few questions for people:

    1. When you last bought a car, how long did you spend researching the model or grilling the salesman for info?
    2. When you last bought a home theater system, how long did you spend picking out just the right model?
    3. When you last made a purchase of something that was important to you, how much information did you absorb on it before buying?
    You see everybody soaks up long sales messages even if they never realized it.

    It might be in the form of reading multiple reviews.

    It might be in the form of talking to a salesman for half an hour.

    It might be in the form of seeing 6 different TV commercials.

    Long form sales copy just takes the entire process and puts it on one page.

    As Steve said above, it shouldn't be long just for the sake of being said.

    But what it should do is tell a serious prospective buyer everything they want to know about the product without them having to hunt for information elsewhere.

    Long copy works when it gives the people what they want.
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  • Profile picture of the author GTCRESSY
    On a long page sales letter I read about the first page to see what it is all about then I scroll down to find out what it costs. Then I usually get to the next offer. Video can keep me longer.
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    I skim read the whole WSO/Sales Pages. A couple words every paragraph and wait for things to catch my eye.
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