Your AWESOME Recording "Studio" (What do you have?)

by warriorgo 14 replies
Hi warriors,

For those who creates podcast, mp3s for your customers and even cds, I'm curious......

What is the software you use for recording, editing etc?
What mic do you use?
What other misc things are required to make your "studio" super-hot? (like a soundproof room or something.....)

Appreciate any sharings!

P.S: Oh, when it comes to voice recording, if there are some cool tips you discovered, please feel free to share them here.
#main internet marketing discussion forum #awesome #recording #studio
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  • Profile picture of the author lakshaybehl
    Use audacity for recording!

    And use any good quality mic with "Noise Cancellation"
    I use Plantronics, and it is awesome especially since it is Bluetooth ... wireless so I can go to the balcony without bothering much about it!

    I personally have a closed studio I have at my home office!

    Just use heavy blankets in place of curtains to get some decent soundproofing...
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    • Profile picture of the author Quentin
      I also use Audacity and a Microsoft USB mic which is pretty good.

      You can see my audacity tutorial here.

      Streaming Audio Made Easy MP3 Sound Stream - Audacity Tutorial

      Good quality audios are fairly easy but audios with good content are another thing.

      Quentin
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      • Profile picture of the author lakshaybehl
        Originally Posted by Quentin View Post

        Good quality audios are fairly easy but audios with good content are another thing.

        Quentin
        Absolutely!

        Unless you are delivering a massive amount of value, quality means nothing!
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        • Profile picture of the author Jason Johns
          Hi there,

          I use Adobe Audition and a USB condensor mike with a pop shield for my recording.

          I've built a 1m square box and insulated it with acoustic foam to put my microphone in to ensure I get decent quality recordings.

          I also kick the kids out of the house before I start

          One thing I can recommend to anyone who is doing voice recording is go join your local Toastmasters group (toastmasters.org) - it'll give you some excellent public speaking practise and really help you deliver high quality and professional speeches without lots of ums and ars and the like!

          All the best

          Jason
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          • Profile picture of the author colinredk
            Originally Posted by Jason Johns View Post

            One thing I can recommend to anyone who is doing voice recording is go join your local Toastmasters group (toastmasters.org) - it'll give you some excellent public speaking practise and really help you deliver high quality and professional speeches without lots of ums and ars and the like!
            The Toastmasters is a worldwide organization which is a great venue for studying public speaking. The exercises help in breaking any fear of public speaking. There's also a critique of the speech and delivery. For a podcast, this may seem like an over-kill. But you would notice the difference in your own recordings after you've gone through some meetings.

            At least, you would be more conscious of your voice, diction and dead air (the ahhhs and the ummms).

            Funny but there are lots of podcasters who use the ambient noise to their advantage. This makes the podcasts more accessible and with more intimacy. I guess that feature of the podcast is a matter of taste. Still, I stay away from any ventilation, or a steady stream of air. Makes me sound like I was talking underwater.

            By the way, I use a Plantronics, with USB with DSP, and a regular Genius with noise cancellation.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brandon Tanner
    Originally Posted by warriorgo View Post

    Hi warriors,

    For those who creates podcast, mp3s for your customers and even cds, I'm curious......

    What is the software you use for recording, editing etc?
    What mic do you use?
    What other misc things are required to make your "studio" super-hot? (like a soundproof room or something.....)

    Appreciate any sharings!

    P.S: Oh, when it comes to voice recording, if there are some cool tips you discovered, please feel free to share them here.
    For recording and editing 1 track at a time, I use Soundforge. For multitracking, I like Sonar. If you're on a budget though, Audacity or Kristal will get the job done just fine.

    I use different mics and mic pres for different occasions. But if you're just looking for something to record your voice to broadcast online, the easiest good-sounding solution is to get a USB mic. Rode makes a really good USB condenser mic at a decent price (can't remember the model name at the moment).

    A couple quick recording tips that will make a huge difference...

    Use a pop filter on your mic (or at least a foam windscreen)

    Record as "hot" as possible without distorting, then use a compressor/limiter to level out the recording's overall volume.

    If you don't want to spend a lot on soundproofing, record late at night when ambient noise is low.

    Hope this helps!
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    • Profile picture of the author Chipt
      Great tips... thank you...

      Chip Tarver

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      • Profile picture of the author write-stuff
        We use ProTools for recording and inhouse developed software for an internet radio broadcast we run.

        - Russ
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        • Profile picture of the author Josh Anderson
          For one track editing I use Sony Sound Forge
          For multi track layering and things like noise removal I use Audacity.

          For portable microphone I use an imic usb analog to digital audio converter and a creative he-100

          For in the office/studio I use an xlr Audio Technica AT3035 Cardioid Condenser Mic connected to either an Edirol UA-25 (for phone recordings) or an MXL Mic Mate XLR to USB converter (for podcasts, screen capture video etc.

          My microphone is in a shock mount connected to a adjustable stand that hangs above my head which I drop down when I am recording.

          For phone interviews I use my AT Studio Mic, the Edirol UA-25 preamp, connected to a JK Audio Inkeeper 1 Digital Hybrid.

          For converting compressing my audio to mp3 I use either my recorder/optimizer software or Jay's mp3 tweak.

          I do have some soundproofing foam tiles in my studio on the walls and ceiling but I use that for video.
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          • Profile picture of the author SeanIM
            ...paging one of the Stomper crew...

            I'd love to hear about their equipment (whoa, that sounded kinda durty)...




            -Sean
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            Online Marketing Consultant Since 1999
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            • Profile picture of the author Ty Maier
              I record using GarageBand on my Mac.

              I use [a="http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/PreSonus-FIREBOX-24bit96kHz-FireWire-Recording-System?sku=184133"]PreSonus Firebox 24bit 96khz[/a] as my external high quality sound card.

              And I use [a="http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Shure-PGX24SM58-Handheld-Wireless-System?sku=270676"]this mic[/a].
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              • Profile picture of the author CSwrite
                My set-up includes a USB podcasting mic that has served me so well. I actually use Cool Edit software, which I believe was swallowed whole by Adobe and later became Audition.

                For noise reduction, there are a few things you can try to get that "studio" sound.

                I found a canvas screen - like a room divider - and I put it up on the back of my desk, folding the ends forward so they were on the sides of the desk - made basically a little canvas booth. I've found this makes the sound a lot richer.

                There's another technique used by indie movie producers where you hang a bunch of comforter's up in the bathroom and record in the tub (sans water of course) but that's a little complicated. The canvas trick works really well.

                Always, always record at least 10 seconds of silence. This will give you a good selection of your ambient background noise. So, turn the mic on, wait ten seconds or more and then begin speaking.

                When you're done, select that ten second space, and use that to build your noise reduction profile. This will make a huge difference in the final audio product. The key is really finding that perfect amount of noise reduction where the background noise is muffled, but you don't sound tinny.

                Hope that helps!
                CS
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              • Profile picture of the author dorothydot
                I also record the background/theme music using Garageband. And I use IMovie to create and edit my DVD's, Toast Titanium to burn them.

                My studio? It's a green flannel sheet hung in front of my file cabinets. With one light to the side, two lights in front and slightly right, and daylight [I only tape on sunny days] on my other side.

                I set my laptop on a heavy-duty music stand, adjust the height and tape using my Mac's built-in camera and mic.

                Works so far,
                Dot
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          • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
            Originally Posted by Josh Anderson View Post

            For in the office/studio I use an xlr Audio Technica AT3035 Cardioid Condenser Mic...
            That's the same mic I have! But, I run mine through a Mackie mixer.
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            • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
              You know, I just realized something.

              I just purchased a Roland BR900 CD multi track recording studio. It comes
              with a built in CD burner.

              I could really make some funky multi track stuff (for IM purposes) burn it
              onto CD and then convert to MP3s for digital download and/or leave as CDs
              to send out via snail mail.

              The possibilities are endless.

              This is going to be a fun year. Thanks for posting this thread.
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