Why are sales pages so long!

by freddie77 27 replies
Is it me or are sales pages just too long!! i've been browsing alot of sales pages (too get an idea on how to present my membership site script) and they just seem to be tooooo long!! am i the only one that thinks this way.

Why not keep it sort, sweet and too the point! i've even seen on some sales pages a truck load of products being offered... all on the one same sales page!

why not have a "sales website" offering your product or service, giving it a professional look? i know sales pages as they are seems to be a standard format..but isn't it time for a revolution!

i don't know, maybe it's me!

Anyone?
#main internet marketing discussion forum #long #pages #sales
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  • Profile picture of the author KarlWarren
    Hi Freddy,

    Some people have long salespages because they work better (for them) than short ones.

    Others have long salespages because they think they work better and haven't tested the alternative.

    Others have long salespages because (insert name here) does, and they think that duplicating their methods will duplicate their success.

    Some have short salespages because they can't write copy and don't know how to convey the benefits of their product/service.

    Some have long salespages because they don't know when to stop.

    Ultimately, YOUR VISITORS and their credit cards will be the judge of which type of salespage you should have.

    Kindest regards,
    Karl.
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  • Profile picture of the author imb
    I remember this is also my question in the very first topic I created here in WF. Check it out at The Warrior Forum - Similar webpage design of internet marketers
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    • Profile picture of the author freddie77
      Thanks I'll check it out!...

      yeah sales pages just don't work for me, when i visit a sales page i first check whats been offered (theres usually an image of the product or service and title), then read the first few lines, then see how much it costs, then decided whether i want the product or service...simple i know, but i can't help thinking maybe visitors think this way as well.
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    • Profile picture of the author grangonzo
      Hello, in my surfing i've noticed that many people are mahing their sales pages shorter by using an explanatory video.

      I think that's a good way to make ot shorter, but if you do not have a viseo in yor sales page, i think tou need tomakr it long to better explain the benefits of your product.

      Regards..
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  • Profile picture of the author sreenivas
    As the Niche become bigger and bigger you may need to go more in detail to explain what all it can do for you & what it can not do.

    Its also a sales tactics to engage customer in brainwashing prior to sale

    Sreenivasa
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    • Profile picture of the author Chris_Willow
      Wealthy affiliate has short sales letter and it's a membership site.
      But if you don't have the fame or credibility you will more likely to sell with longer salesletter giving away more information so the buyer would feel more confident about the purchase. You can add multiple buy now buttons, some closer to the top, so people who want to buy it badly don't have to scroll all the way down...

      Chris
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      • Profile picture of the author peteinoz
        Part of it is that this is what this market percieves as a good letter as much as they dont read it all.. and if you have a short one, people "may" think its strange

        It's noted that by the Year 2020 You will need to outsource your Sales Copy Reading to cheap labor, who have the time to read them entirely

        pete
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      • Profile picture of the author freddie77
        Originally Posted by Chris_Willow View Post

        Wealthy affiliate has short sales letter and it's a membership site.
        But if you don't have the fame or credibility you will more likely to sell with longer salesletter giving away more information so the buyer would feel more confident about the purchase. You can add multiple buy now buttons, some closer to the top, so people who want to buy it badly don't have to scroll all the way down...

        Chris
        Hi chris,
        I understand making your buyer feel confident to purchase thats very important! but would creating a site with an "about page, features page, products page etc" give the same confidence?
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    • Profile picture of the author freddie77
      Originally Posted by sreenivas View Post

      As the Niche become bigger and bigger you may need to go more in detail to explain what all it can do for you & what it can not do.

      Its also a sales tactics to engage customer in brainwashing prior to sale

      Sreenivasa
      but couldn't this be done under a "features" page...i mean if you was to visit say the amember website (as an example) its a "sales website", and successful from what i know (i dont think they use sales pages), so wouldn't this work for any product or service...i just don't understand the whole "sales page" concept.
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      • Profile picture of the author peteinoz
        Originally Posted by freddie77 View Post

        but couldn't this be done under a "features" page...i mean if you was to visit say the amember website (as an example) its a "sales website", and successful from what i know (i dont think they use sales pages), so wouldn't this work for any product or service...i just don't understand the whole "sales page" concept.
        do you really want a potential customer to have to click one more time prior to making a sale?


        pete
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        • Profile picture of the author freddie77
          Originally Posted by peteinoz View Post

          do you really want a potential customer to have to click one more time prior to making a sale?


          pete
          well... i dont know i mean if they want the product or service they will buy it, i just think sales pages (for me) can make the product or service look unprofessional..i've visited a few and just from the look of the site i wont even bother to see whats been offered..

          so the whole thing about getting the customer to buy on their first click...doesn't work for me! if they wont it they will buy it i suppose and if the product or service is explained honestly and properly and its what the customr wants, then you will get a sale.
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          • Profile picture of the author Simon_Sezs
            The good sales letters are scannable. This requires a lot of white space which makes for a longer page. Also, consider some of the things that good sales letters have...

            1. A good headline with a post headline
            2. An Introduction presents a problem.
            3. Social Proof that it works (testimonials and screen shots)
            4. Benefits bullets (why should they buy)
            5. Features bullets (what they will learn, what the product will do for them, ect)
            6. A guarantee.
            7. Bonuses and extras
            8. A summation.
            Now obviously, you could shorten it up. But considering all this, if your product can hold its weight in water, you want to give the potential buyer every reason in the world to buy the product. The more bullets, the greater the chance that you will give the potential sale no reason not to buy.

            I have been experimenting with shortening up ad copy by using video and a photo gallery with my social proof as well as expandable tables. In other words, the ad copy from the outset looks short but people can open up the ad copy as they go down and pick and choose what they see. The result is that there is more interaction between the customer and the site itself. Not sure if it will affect conversions.

            The one thing I do know is that the longer the ad copy (provided that the ad copy is good), the greater the conversion rate.
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            • Profile picture of the author Corwinnx
              The Better To Tantalize You With My Dear.

              *Why do I have a sudden urge to rewrite the story of Little Red Riding Hood?


              -Marcus
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              • Profile picture of the author freddie77
                Originally Posted by Corwinnx View Post

                The Better To Tantalize You With My Dear.

                *Why do I have a sudden urge to rewrite the story of Little Red Riding Hood?


                -Marcus
                lol, very funny!...

                I dont know i'm still not convieced about sales pages (no that i wont to be) if they were so irressistable every company that offers a product or service online would use them, i dont want to convince anyone to my way of thinking (think my way, think my way!) but i think websites work better instead of sales pages...
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              • Profile picture of the author Jason Fladlien
                Sheesh.

                This is not a simple answer, but I'll make it as simple as possible.

                First, you have to know what you're selling. If you're pepsi, you don't need long copy. Instead, you use reputation, the power of celebrities, product placement, and etc. for persuasion.

                However, if you're Joe Blow, selling an intangible INFORMATION PRODUCT that someone has to pay for, who knows nothing of you, who is likely to have been ripped off when buying information products in the past, and has a ton of questions and concerns... then you're going to have to build your case.

                How do you do that? Well, by establishing proof... handling their objections and turning them into sales points... explaining your benefits and what your product can do for them and why it's in their best interest to buy, how to buy, what they'll get, and so forth. Do you think this can be done in a few paragraphs?

                No.

                Especially if you're selling anything over $17.

                The question really becomes... how are you going to persuade people to buy into your membership site instead of any other similar competing membership site out there. And why is your site worth far more in value than what they'll pay in price. And what do they get, and how does it benefit them?

                Try explaining that to me, and see how long it takes you.

                Now the question becomes... okay but can't we just break them up into pages..? Well that's dangerous. The game then isthat you hope they discover all your benefits, and you hope they find all the stuff they need to find to persuade them, and then you hope they go ahead and order. You've given up all control of the sales situation.

                I wouldn't recommend that.

                So my question to you is -- what persuasion triggers are you going to use to get people to buy into your site? And how are you going to present those to have maximum effect? If you can come up with an answer that's better than solid, direct response copywriting, let me know and I'll gladly adopt your method.

                Really, it all comes down to this... do you want your own personal opinion to be validated, or do you want to make money? I'd rather be rich than right.

                -Jason
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                • Profile picture of the author freddie77
                  Originally Posted by Jason Fladlien View Post

                  Sheesh.

                  This is not a simple answer, but I'll make it as simple as possible.

                  First, you have to know what you're selling. If you're pepsi, you don't need long copy. Instead, you use reputation, the power of celebrities, product placement, and etc. for persuasion.

                  However, if you're Joe Blow, selling an intangible INFORMATION PRODUCT that someone has to pay for, who knows nothing of you, who is likely to have been ripped off when buying information products in the past, and has a ton of questions and concerns... then you're going to have to build your case.

                  How do you do that? Well, by establishing proof... handling their objections and turning them into sales points... explaining your benefits and what your product can do for them and why it's in their best interest to buy, how to buy, what they'll get, and so forth. Do you think this can be done in a few paragraphs?

                  No.

                  Especially if you're selling anything over $17.

                  The question really becomes... how are you going to persuade people to buy into your membership site instead of any other similar competing membership site out there. And why is your site worth far more in value than what they'll pay in price. And what do they get, and how does it benefit them?

                  Try explaining that to me, and see how long it takes you.

                  Now the question becomes... okay but can't we just break them up into pages..? Well that's dangerous. The game then isthat you hope they discover all your benefits, and you hope they find all the stuff they need to find to persuade them, and then you hope they go ahead and order. You've given up all control of the sales situation.

                  I wouldn't recommend that.

                  So my question to you is -- what persuasion triggers are you going to use to get people to buy into your site? And how are you going to present those to have maximum effect? If you can come up with an answer that's better than solid, direct response copywriting, let me know and I'll gladly adopt your method.

                  Really, it all comes down to this... do you want your own personal opinion to be validated, or do you want to make money? I'd rather be rich than right.

                  -Jason
                  I'm not creating a membership site but a membership script and i intend to tell potential customers about what the script offers.. and i'm not looking to get validation i started this thread to create a debate about sales pages! i understand how to present a product so it can generate sales (like most people here), i just think sales pages are too long, and i think their isn't just one way of presenting your product or service...looking at other websites it seems that is the case...and yes i want to be super rich - wealthy is the word....and right!
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            • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
              Originally Posted by Simon_Sezs View Post

              The good sales letters are scannable. This requires a lot of white space which makes for a longer page. Also, consider some of the things that good sales letters have...

              1. A good headline with a post headline
              2. An Introduction presents a problem.
              3. Social Proof that it works (testimonials and screen shots)
              4. Benefits bullets (why should they buy)
              5. Features bullets (what they will learn, what the product will do for them, ect)
              6. A guarantee.
              7. Bonuses and extras
              8. A summation.
              I agree here. People will vary as to how they read a sales letter.

              If you're new to such things, you will read the entire thing, if it is something you are interested in and the letter is written well enough to keep you reading.

              After you've encountered a few letters like that, you begin skimming, looking for headlines and checking out features.

              Eventually, you just get to the point where you read the headline, scroll down to the bottom to see how much it is, and then, if it's in your price range, go back and read the letter.

              With a short letter, you risk losing a sale because you don't give the buyer enough information to make a purchase. And, if they have to click to different sections to read more, that just gives them greater opportunity to have second thoughts or go somewhere else.

              With a long letter, you stand a better chance of answering their questions and providing them with ample information to convince them they need the product you are selling. If the letter is spaced out nicely and broken up into sections, the more savvy buyers can more easily skip around and find the specific information they want to know before making a purchase.

              In all cases, you really have to grab their attention from the very start. If you can't get them to read past the first couple sentences, you've lost them.
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            • Profile picture of the author grangonzo
              Originally Posted by Simon_Sezs View Post

              The good sales letters are scannable. This requires a lot of white space which makes for a longer page. Also, consider some of the things that good sales letters have...

              1. A good headline with a post headline
              2. An Introduction presents a problem.
              3. Social Proof that it works (testimonials and screen shots)
              4. Benefits bullets (why should they buy)
              5. Features bullets (what they will learn, what the product will do for them, ect)
              6. A guarantee.
              7. Bonuses and extras
              8. A summation.
              Now obviously, you could shorten it up. But considering all this, if your product can hold its weight in water, you want to give the potential buyer every reason in the world to buy the product. The more bullets, the greater the chance that you will give the potential sale no reason not to buy.

              I have been experimenting with shortening up ad copy by using video and a photo gallery with my social proof as well as expandable tables. In other words, the ad copy from the outset looks short but people can open up the ad copy as they go down and pick and choose what they see. The result is that there is more interaction between the customer and the site itself. Not sure if it will affect conversions.

              The one thing I do know is that the longer the ad copy (provided that the ad copy is good), the greater the conversion rate.
              Yeap, i agree. It's a sales page it must sell, and you can't sell with a brief description, you must give the potential buyer the most you can..

              Regards...
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              • Profile picture of the author freddie77
                Originally Posted by grangonzo View Post

                Yeap, i agree. It's a sales page it must sell, and you can't sell with a brief description, you must give the potential buyer the most you can..

                Regards...
                i understand not givng a brief description, every product or service needs a good desciption, my thing is sales pages are just too long, if you go to say (another example) the dmxready website - this works for me as it explains what they offer its clean, to the point, short and sweet with 7 pages..now thats what i call sales baby!!
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  • Originally Posted by freddie77 View Post

    Is it me or are sales pages just too long!! i've been browsing alot of sales pages (too get an idea on how to present my membership site script) and they just seem to be tooooo long!! am i the only one that thinks this way.

    Why not keep it sort, sweet and too the point! i've even seen on some sales pages a truck load of products being offered... all on the one same sales page!

    why not have a "sales website" offering your product or service, giving it a professional look? i know sales pages as they are seems to be a standard format..but isn't it time for a revolution!

    i don't know, maybe it's me!

    Anynoe?
    Instead of complaining about 'long' salespages, why don’t you try to make a difference by creating short salespages yourself?

    Just kidding! But that is actually what I did. My salespages are some of the shortest you will find in the industry. If you wanna have a look at them, be my guest.

    Personally me and my customers like short and to the point salespages, and I have found they convert better than my longer ones. Of course, that maybe just me.

    Arindam
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    • Profile picture of the author freddie77
      Originally Posted by Arindam Chakraborty View Post

      Instead of complaining about 'long' salespages, why don’t you try to make a difference by creating short salespages yourself?

      Just kidding! But that is actually what I did. My salespages are some of the shortest you will find in the industry. If you wanna have a look at them, be my guest.

      Personally me and my customers like short and to the point salespages, and I have found they convert better than my longer ones. Of course, that maybe just me.

      Arindam
      complaining, me!..

      i'll take a look...
      (just wanted to create a debate about it, "cause i'm that type of guy"!)
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      • Originally Posted by freddie77 View Post

        complaining, me!..

        i'll take a look...
        (just wanted to create a debate about it, "cause i'm that type of guy"!)
        Ok, sent you a PM. Enjoy!:p

        Arindam
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      • Profile picture of the author Corwinnx
        My experience in IM and working with Miranda has taught me this...

        Your customer can't see you, knows almost nothing about you, and has no reason to believe in you. Some people want the 'short' version, some people want every single tiny possible detail they can get. The art of writing good copy addresses that in a way that is similar to the way public speaking is taught:

        Tell them what you are going to tell them

        Tell them

        Tell them what you told them.

        Writing good sales copy is an art and a science. The art exists in creating a story that touches the reader on a personal level on a subject that addresses his problem and gives him or her a 'personal' side to identify with in you (the story you create.) The science is in knowing what color and size font to use in your headline, knowing that your bullet points need to start before they ever have to touch the slide bar on the right side of the screen to scroll down, where to place your 'call to action' and at what points to repeat and recap. Most people read the headline, skim the intro, and read the bullet points, the recap and the PS. They also tend to IMMEDIATELY scroll down to the bottom for the price, so your 'bullet points, along the way, are what they are drawn to as they are scrolling downward.

        That's why copy is long. It's about pyschological triggers. You have to use every single one in the arsenal because on the web, there are very few 'personal relationships' with the salesman.

        -Marcus
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  • Profile picture of the author BobbyWalker
    Originally Posted by freddie77 View Post

    Is it me or are sales pages just too long!! i've been browsing alot of sales pages (too get an idea on how to present my membership site script) and they just seem to be tooooo long!! am i the only one that thinks this way.

    Why not keep it sort, sweet and too the point! i've even seen on some sales pages a truck load of products being offered... all on the one same sales page!

    why not have a "sales website" offering your product or service, giving it a professional look? i know sales pages as they are seems to be a standard format..but isn't it time for a revolution!

    i don't know, maybe it's me!

    Anyone?
    We've been doing some testing on short copy with video
    and so far it's working out great, but I do think some products
    have to have long sales copy to do well..

    Thx,

    Bobby
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