Falling for Nigerian Email Scam Costs $458,782.60

57 replies
A Nigerian-style email scam made it into a California court case, with some important lessons to be learned. (If you start seeing more spam of this type you can thank our hero for this.)

Our hero, Peters, received one of the those emails requesting help depositing a large sum of money.

Peters received over $800,000 in checks and deposited them with his bank.

After the bank confirmed the checks had cleared he then had his bank wire about $460,000 to the scammer in Hong Kong.

A couple weeks later the bank came back and said the checks had been altered with a special acid and upon further review were worthless.

The bank then sued Peters for $460,000.

Result: bank wins right to attach Peters property even before trial because it is likely to win the case.

Why: Peters was negligent and per the Uniform Commercial Code was thus precluded from asserting a defense that the bank was also negligent. Peters was also unable to allocate any portion of the loss to the bank because he failed to prove the bank was negligent.

Oops.

Lessons:

The obvious - don't fall for emails from foreign lands claiming they have tons of money which they need your help in depositing.

The less obvious until now - you cannot rely on your bank telling you funds have cleared. If you have a huge sum of money coming in which you are relying upon to send money out, which could bankrupt you if the funds are bad, be extra slow in paying that money out.

The less less obvious - in this case the money transfer was through a corporation, ironically called "Faux". Peters was still personally liable as typical bank accounts require personal responsibility for company debts.

.
#$458 #costs #email #falling #nigerian #scam
  • Profile picture of the author Bill Farnham
    Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

    The less obvious until now - you cannot rely on your bank telling you funds have cleared. If you have a huge sum of money coming in which you are relying upon to send money out, which could bankrupt you if the funds are bad, be extra slow in paying that money out.
    OUCH!

    This can also happen with credit card orders. Found this out the hard way years ago when my wife and I were selling electronics at the time. Mostly retail, but also a little wholesaling.

    Had an order for $17,000 worth of radios the buyer put on a credit card. The bank said the money was in the account, so we purchased the inventory to resell. The money stayed there for almost 3 weeks.

    That was until the real owner of the cc opened his statement and found a $17K charge from our company. Poof, money taken back out.

    Luckily we delayed shipping the products out or we would have had an additional nightmare to deal with. Now we don't ship products out like that unless we verify the buyer over the phone.

    You can never be too careful.

    ~Bill
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  • Profile picture of the author Peter.J
    I wonder when people will realise that these emails are scams. It surprises me that many people still fall for it.

    Funny story though, I had a friend that owned an internet cafe here and there was one guy (Nigerian) that use to visit the cafe everyday, spending about 5 - 6 hours (thats dedication) so we decided to put some spy thing on the computers and monitor what he does.

    Well no surprise he was creating emails to send to unsuspecting victims, keeping in touch with his hoodlums back home and generally one of the creators of the many thousands of scam emails.

    Good news is though, we informed the police and a lovely detective ( which she really was lovely - if only I was a few years older sigh) stuck around and caught him in the act, slapped cuffs on and threw him in the back of a police van. Still surprising people fall for it though.

    Bill, thats awful, luckily you were still in possession of the goods and could recover but what a pity such animals exist in our society.
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    • Profile picture of the author jeskola
      Originally Posted by Peter.J View Post

      I wonder when people will realise that these emails are scams. It surprises me that many people still fall for it.

      Funny story though, I had a friend that owned an internet cafe here and there was one guy (Nigerian) that use to visit the cafe everyday, spending about 5 - 6 hours (thats dedication) so we decided to put some spy thing on the computers and monitor what he does.

      Well no surprise he was creating emails to send to unsuspecting victims, keeping in touch with his hoodlums back home and generally one of the creators of the many thousands of scam emails.

      Good news is though, we informed the police and a lovely detective ( which she really was lovely - if only I was a few years older sigh) stuck around and caught him in the act, slapped cuffs on and threw him in the back of a police van. Still surprising people fall for it though.

      Bill, thats awful, luckily you were still in possession of the goods and could recover but what a pity such animals exist in our society.
      A guy i know who is quite tech savvy recently MSN'd me to say he had just won the lottery.... in Holland (he lives in the UK) and he had emailed back his creadit card details (?!?!) for them to pay in his cash.

      He said - "i've not heard back from them, what should i do?"

      I said............... "cancel your cards" :lol:

      Can't believe he fell for it.
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      • Profile picture of the author skibbz
        Originally Posted by jeskola View Post

        A guy i know who is quite tech savvy recently MSN'd me to say he had just won the lottery.... in Holland (he lives in the UK) and he had emailed back his creadit card details (?!?!) for them to pay in his cash.

        He said - "i've not heard back from them, what should i do?"

        I said............... "cancel your cards" :lol:

        Can't believe he fell for it.
        some people are blinded by the thought of getting a lottery winning, they just not thinking straight
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    • Profile picture of the author opiniones
      Originally Posted by Peter.J View Post

      I wonder when people will realise that these emails are scams. It surprises me that many people still fall for it.
      I think people should get better email providers or ones that have better control against spam. Not just to protect against fraud but phishing, viruses etc.

      It's one of the reasons I stopped using yahoo email and went to gmail because gmail does a much better job at keeping spam away. All the months I had my gmail account I can say that I haven't had more than 200 or so spam emails which would be probably 1000+ for the same amount of time for a yahoo account.
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      • Profile picture of the author Gino Robin
        Hi, all
        To receive money for ..free must ring a bell,nobody give that total of money away and just walk away.....

        To get rich quick..is a scam...and if you wanna get rich rather learn the hard way....cause....that money YOU will never apreciate

        Thanks
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        • Profile picture of the author Grace26
          I also receive these types of emails everyday for some reason which I don't know. However, I just direct them to SPAM.

          I agree one has to be prudent when it comes to dealing with people who look suspicious in their ways. How can someone just announce that you have won $2 million dollars for a Lotto that you never purchased a ticket for. We just have to stay alert.
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  • Profile picture of the author Peter.J
    Originally Posted by SquidProxies.com View Post

    If your dumb enough to fall for such an obvious scam then maybe you deserve it?
    There is truth in this but also remember that many people could be desperate enough to try anything. Look at drug runners as an example, I am not saying it is right, far from it but it is a prime example of the length a person in desperate need of financial freedom will go to.

    I would say it is ignorance and desperation not that they deserve it.

    Of course there is expections to the rule where someone just wants a quick buck, then yes, they deserve it.
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  • Profile picture of the author glycodoc
    I think greed is the reason most people fall for these scams. Yes if you are having financial problems you may be tempted, but a little common sense should be enough to tell yiou "NO".
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  • Profile picture of the author wpiercy
    I cant believe these scams work, but there are people out there dumb enough to fall for them. I had an gf who asked me if we could help them(being these scammers) out. Now she is an EX gf, and is probably next in line to fall for this scam. If people were not easily duped, did not fall for this scam, it would go away.
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  • Profile picture of the author lambdaevan
    Banned
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author Dexx
      Originally Posted by lambdaevan View Post

      Its amazing that even with all the mainstream attention these scams have gotten in the press, people still fall for them.

      Admittedly some of them may seem legit under some circumstances, but really? Really?

      The craziest one I saw was on a news program where the woman kept falling for the scam over and over and over. Even when everyone was telling her it was a scam, she wouldn't listen. Must be some type of psychological disorder.
      People see and hear what they want to =/

      ~Dexx
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      • Profile picture of the author Raymond_Perrin
        Originally Posted by Dexx View Post

        People see and hear what they want to =/

        ~Dexx
        Reminds me of a line in a Jim Carrey movie (paraphrasing here):

        She: People hear what they want to hear.

        He (moving his hand through his hair): Thanks, I just had it done yesterday.

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  • Profile picture of the author skibbz
    This is just crazy, I hate scammers....ughh!!
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  • Profile picture of the author skibbz
    They have some sick scammers who created a lottery sscam in jamaica.They called retired US citizens on the phone and tricked them that they won the lotto but in order to collect the winnings they would have to pay a fee. The cops cracked down on the ring and locked them up
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    • Profile picture of the author Kim Standerline
      I love it (in a weird sick kind of way) when I get scammy phone calls.

      I've been able to hone my voice to perfection to sound cold and businesslike in a don't mess with me or I'll stab you kind of way.

      Very satisfying to hear the person on the other end begin to sound wobbly and unsure of themselves. They usually finish the call very quickly, (makes my husband grin when I do it so I must sound mean)

      Kim

      Originally Posted by skibbz View Post

      They have some sick scammers who created a lottery sscam in jamaica.They called retired US citizens on the phone and tricked them that they won the lotto but in order to collect the winnings they would have to pay a fee. The cops cracked down on the ring and locked them up
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  • Profile picture of the author enterpryzman
    How on Earth could anyone with even an ounce of brains ever fall for such a scam ? These types of stories completely shock me and it is pretty much impossible for me to relate or feel in any way sorry for the person dumb enough to try this.......the truth hurts !

    Enterpryzman
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    • Profile picture of the author skibbz
      Originally Posted by enterpryzman View Post

      How on Earth could anyone with even an ounce of brains ever fall for such a scam ? These types of stories completely shock me and it is pretty much impossible for me to relate or feel in any way sorry for the person dumb enough to try this.......the truth hurts !

      Enterpryzman
      some people were born with pea brains
      not everyone is as lucky as us to have a good brain hahaha
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    • Profile picture of the author tj
      Originally Posted by enterpryzman View Post

      How on Earth could anyone with even an ounce of brains ever fall for such a scam ? These types of stories completely shock me and it is pretty much impossible for me to relate or feel in any way sorry for the person dumb enough to try this.......the truth hurts !

      Enterpryzman
      Some state government was hit this kind of scam too - they paid a large amount to a so called business w/o any further checking.

      Timo
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  • Profile picture of the author Sheryl Polomka
    It is surprising that people fall for these scams, surely if you get an email telling you that they want to give you all this money, alarm bells would start ringing. Nobody gives you money for nothing.

    The bank should be held partly liable though, how can they clear a check that isn't real? When a check is cleared doesn't that mean that they money has been taken out of the check creators account? So if the bank cleared it without money being transferred out then they should be partly liable.
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    • Profile picture of the author skibbz
      Originally Posted by Sheryl Polomka View Post

      It is surprising that people fall for these scams, surely if you get an email telling you that they want to give you all this money, alarm bells would start ringing. Nobody gives you money for nothing.

      The bank should be held partly liable though, how can they clear a check that isn't real? When a check is cleared doesn't that mean that they money has been taken out of the check creators account? So if the bank cleared it without money being transferred out then they should be partly liable.
      weak controls
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  • Profile picture of the author Don Schenk
    About two years ago a Cincinnati lady got caught up in one of these 419 scams. In the process she wired $15,000 to the scammers, and she had to make good at the bank for the $15K.

    She had her 15 minutes of fame through the local news media.

    :-Don
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  • Profile picture of the author PaulaC
    A lady at my old 9 to 5 job got scammed by something similar. They kept telling her that they needed $500 to sort the paperwork out and then they would get the money to her. Then another $500, then $1000....they just kept giving her all sorts of excuses for needing the money to sort out things with the bank, lawyers etc but she would get millions when it was finalized. Before she knew it she was out $9000. She realized then that she was being scammed.
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    • Profile picture of the author psresearch
      I actually had one of my subscribers who's daughter was arrested for cashing a bogus check and wiring money.


      I've had more than one person on my list where it took getting a good friend of mine involved who works closely with an assigned federal agent convince someone NOT to do something like this. After one of these incidents he helped me put out this information to the list:



      "He can thank his lucky stars he hasn't wired the money from his bank account. He needs to know that he could still be charged with wire fraud even though all he has done is deposit the check into his bank account. That doesn't mean he would have been charged, but they could if they wanted to charge him. That's how dangerous this all is, and he is the only one they know, and where to find him.


      He has received a bogus check, and was cashing it. That is stealing, and depending on the dollar amount of the check will depend on which degree of felony it is.


      He would be classed as an accomplice in an illegal act to defraud a bank. Since the party who issued him the check is not a real entity that can be traced, he is the one they arrest.


      By his not wiring the funds, he has reduced the charges they could bring against him. As I said, I doubt if they would, but they could if they wanted to do so. Just like the dollar amount of the check, what his role is also plays a part in what charges they might bring. That is why this is so scary and people have no clue they are committing fraud, wire fraud, and also could be charged with money laundering."
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  • Profile picture of the author Fazal Mayar
    Yes, I get these emails often. It's really really unfortunate that these guys scams like this. I wish I was an Internet Scam Expert so I could arrest them all.
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

    The less obvious until now - you cannot rely on your bank telling you funds have cleared. If you have a huge sum of money coming in which you are relying upon to send money out, which could bankrupt you if the funds are bad, be extra slow in paying that money out.

    The less less obvious - in this case the money transfer was through a corporation, ironically called "Faux". Peters was still personally liable as typical bank accounts require personal responsibility for company debts.

    Greed is always met with an ugly retribution...

    And the Get Rich Quick is often delivered with failure beyond the next bend...
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  • Profile picture of the author dremora
    I had this friend who was schizo but a brilliant mathematical genius. He had a long thread mocking those Nigerian scammers. He replied back to them and wrote very elaborate emails promising them stuff, the scammers didn't realize the guy was mocking them until they read the 30th email.

    There was this other scammer who scammed the Nigerian scammer. He pretended to be broke with no transportation, made this whole sob story about starving and made them wire something like $200. Of course he never deposited the fake checks they sent after that The guy was boasting about it on the internets.
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    • Profile picture of the author tpw
      Originally Posted by dremora View Post

      I had this friend who was schizo but a brilliant mathematical genius. He had a long thread mocking those Nigerian scammers. He replied back to them and wrote very elaborate emails promising them stuff, the scammers didn't realize the guy was mocking them until they read the 30th email.

      I read that one... It was a riot...
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  • Profile picture of the author mattlaclear
    I fell for a scam myself in my twenties. I bounced a check on something or another. Which was something I was often prone to do back in those days through pure neglect. Several months later I received a call from a bill collector who purchased the account saying that they were going to call the local sheriff that afternoon if I did not send them $500 (more than 5 times for the amount of the bounced check). So I sent the money via Western Union and thought nothing more of it. Fifteen years later i received a check for $200 from some Federal agency who filed suit against the person who pulled this off on me. Come to find out the guy running the collection agency ended up duping several hundred people the same way that he had me in which he threatened immediate incarceration if they were not paid the same day. Seems that is quite illegal. After a lengthy battle in court they ended up throwing him in prison and ceased $250k worth of gold coins that he had socked away in a safe deposit box. The proceeds from the coins went to all the victims. Which equated to around $200 per victim.

    The Nigerian scams seem pretty weak though. But given the right circumstances anybody can be scammed.
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  • Profile picture of the author pcpupil
    This world needs to be tougher on scammers,thieves,ect.
    The whole world is a wussy.
    Take the person out and either put them in front off a firing squad,or hang them in the main 4 way intersection in town,publicly.
    Then they will stop.
    Period.
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    • Profile picture of the author mattlaclear
      Originally Posted by pcpupil View Post

      This world needs to be tougher on scammers,thieves,ect.
      The whole world is a wussy.
      Take the person out and either put them in front off a firing squad,or hang them in the main 4 way intersection in town,publicly.
      Then they will stop.
      Period.
      My Gawd...I didn't realize the Taliban was on the WF as well. Man, this forum is certainly a far reaching global community.
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      • Profile picture of the author rosetrees
        Originally Posted by mattlaclear View Post

        My Gawd...I didn't realize the Taliban was on the WF as well. Man, this forum is certainly a far reaching global community.
        Actually, I think pcpupil has a point - although his solution might be considered a little extreme

        Scammers continue to scam because, for the most part, they know they will get away with it.

        It's almost unheard of for mobile phone companies/internet phone companies/international police - to actually co-operate on locating them. Many would be relatively easily traced IF there was the "policital" will to do it. There isn't, so they continue.

        In my experience (from my anti-scam blog) most victims fall for scams because they "want" to believe - I know that, because that's what they tell me.
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  • Profile picture of the author Richnana
    We wer running a computer training business in Silicon Valley. One of our customers came by one day to tell us that the banks in his native Nigeria was causing him some problems. He had over 25 million in the account. He needed to get the money out of the country because of some political issues with his family.

    If we would help him, he would pay us over 8 million dollars.

    He presented some really official looking documents from the Bank of Nigeria. Gave us a a telephone number to call to confirm the transfer. The person answered the phone as a Bank of Nigeria Manager. Told us that we needed to open a separate account in U.S and put at least 100K in the account.

    We then needed to call them once this was completed so they could verify that we had the money to pay fees, etc. The fees kept going up until we decided we were not going to make any more money available.

    But, we were pumped. How many computers and how much training would we have to deliver to make 8Million.

    My partner and I were pumped. The request, however, went too far.

    The only reason we were saved from financial ruin is that they wanted us to fly to Nigeria. When we went to get Passports, we were alerted to the fact, that many Americans who went to Nigeria to get money, never returned.
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    • Profile picture of the author Daniel Brock
      Originally Posted by Richnana View Post

      The only reason we were saved from financial ruin is that they wanted us to fly to Nigeria. When we went to get Passports, we were alerted to the fact, that many Americans who went to Nigeria to get money, never returned.
      They get killed??? Don't even have the words....
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    • Profile picture of the author CanuckWarrior
      Does anybody else see the irony of this thread?

      Just wondering.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    That exact thing happened to me... but they werent trying to deposit money, they were buying a truckload of wholesale merchandise from me, and wanted me, after the check cleared the first bank, to wire money back their freight forwarder to come pick up the shipment.

    Why not? My bank cleared the check right? I did the right thing and didnt move till it cleared right? Wrong!

    On day 32 the second bank called my bank, then my bank called me and said I had to put the 12k back in because the check was a scam... unfortunately I had already sent their "freight forwarder" thousands of dollars, and it was too late to turn it around.

    I can identify.


    Originally Posted by kindsvater View Post

    A Nigerian-style email scam made it into a California court case, with some important lessons to be learned. (If you start seeing more spam of this type you can thank our hero for this.)

    Our hero, Peters, received one of the those emails requesting help depositing a large sum of money.

    Peters received over $800,000 in checks and deposited them with his bank.

    After the bank confirmed the checks had cleared he then had his bank wire about $460,000 to the scammer in Hong Kong.

    A couple weeks later the bank came back and said the checks had been altered with a special acid and upon further review were worthless.

    The bank then sued Peters for $460,000.

    Result: bank wins right to attach Peters property even before trial because it is likely to win the case.

    Why: Peters was negligent and per the Uniform Commercial Code was thus precluded from asserting a defense that the bank was also negligent. Peters was also unable to allocate any portion of the loss to the bank because he failed to prove the bank was negligent.

    Oops.

    Lessons:

    The obvious - don't fall for emails from foreign lands claiming they have tons of money which they need your help in depositing.

    The less obvious until now - you cannot rely on your bank telling you funds have cleared. If you have a huge sum of money coming in which you are relying upon to send money out, which could bankrupt you if the funds are bad, be extra slow in paying that money out.

    The less less obvious - in this case the money transfer was through a corporation, ironically called "Faux". Peters was still personally liable as typical bank accounts require personal responsibility for company debts.

    .
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  • Profile picture of the author LarryC
    I think more of these e-mails now come from Asia than Africa, though they come from all over. Sure, such scammers deserve to be punished, but I have trouble feeling too much sympathy for the victims in these cases. It just defies all common sense that a total stranger is going to trust you with huge sums of money. In most cases, I'd guess that the victim is trying to pull a scam himself. Actually, it must be an extremely tiny percentage of people who fall for this. Just about everyone gets these e-mails -I get several every day- and this scam has been well known for a long time.
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  • Profile picture of the author John Durham
    Originally Posted by enterpryzman View Post

    How on Earth could anyone with even an ounce of brains ever fall for such a scam ? These types of stories completely shock me and it is pretty much impossible for me to relate or feel in any way sorry for the person dumb enough to try this.......the truth hurts !

    Enterpryzman
    If a check was cleared by your trusted banking institution and they said it was good wouldnt you believe them?

    Thats what happens.... somehow. These guys are so good they fool bank presidents who have seen it all... certainly they could fool some of us.
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    • Profile picture of the author enterpryzman
      Originally Posted by John Durham View Post

      If a check was cleared by your trusted banking institution and they said it was good wouldnt you believe them?

      Thats what happens.... somehow. These guys are so good they fool bank presidents who have seen it all... certainly they could fool some of us.


      No, I would never give the time of day to anything like this, it would NEVER happen in real life and that is the place I live....in real life.

      I have had many offers like this and never gave it a second thought. I have had overseas calls come to my office that are op. assisted which means the caller is typing what the op is to say to me.....they claim to want to buy some of my products and have me ship them to nigeria...they want to pay with a credit card which would be obviously stolen......when I explain that they can mail me funds and after they clear I will wait an additional 30 days and then ship to them, they disconnect the call.

      I have had the same exact call at least 4 times in the last year or so........I know that some in my offline industry have fallen for this but as I stated, it only takes about 1 second of thought to know it is a total scam.

      Enterpryzman


      PS:
      as smart as I say I am, I have been duped by a warrior who said he was hard-up and needed pre-paid for a job which he never did and then his phone was disconnected. I LET MYSELF get screwed out of several hundred dollars <<<<< that should have never happened and it was nobody's fault but mine.
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      • Profile picture of the author John Durham
        Originally Posted by enterpryzman View Post

        No, I would never give the time of day to anything like this, it would NEVER happen in real life and that is the place I live....in real life.

        I have had many offers like this and never gave it a second thought. I have had overseas calls come to my office that are op. assisted which means the caller is typing what the op is to say to me.....they claim to want to buy some of my products and have me ship them to nigeria...they want to pay with a credit card which would be obviously stolen......when I explain that they can mail me funds and after they clear I will wait an additional 30 days and then ship to them, they disconnect the call.

        I have had the same exact call at least 4 times in the last year or so........I know that some in my offline industry have fallen for this but as I stated, it only takes about 1 second of thought to know it is a total scam.

        Enterpryzman


        PS:
        as smart as I say I am, I have been duped by a warrior who said he was hard-up and needed pre-paid for a job which he never did and then his phone was disconnected. I LET MYSELF get screwed out of several hundred dollars <<<<< that should have never happened and it was nobody's fault but mine.

        Well, you are a smarter man than me! Good for you!
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      • Profile picture of the author DogScout
        Originally Posted by enterpryzman View Post



        PS:
        as smart as I say I am, I have been duped by a warrior who said he was hard-up and needed pre-paid for a job which he never did and then his phone was disconnected. I LET MYSELF get screwed out of several hundred dollars <<<<< that should have never happened and it was nobody's fault but mine.
        You're a good guy. I would have done it too. As long as I had money I didn't care if I saw it again. & I do occasionally. I have paid for groceries for the guy in front of me at the store when his credit card wouldn't go through. (It was diapers and baby food, if it had been beer and cigs, I wouldn't have. He said he'd send me the $ and I said, "pass it on". He may or may not, not my concern.) Don't let one a$$ jade your outlook.

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  • Profile picture of the author skibbz
    These Nigerian scams are always coming in my inbox as junk mail,I thought everyone would be familiar with them by now. who in their right mind would send $50 million dollars to a stranger's account?
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  • Profile picture of the author alanmoore78
    They are everywhere. Name the niche, the scammers have it covered.

    Are you looking to become a nanny? I am a foreign consulate attache' and I spend way too much time abroad. I would like you to care for my special needs child. I will send all needed equipment and supplies to you to care for him/her and their condition. Because of the attention to detail needed I will pay you $4000 a month. But because I care for my child and I want them to be safe, I must run NICS background and criminal and civil checks on you and each member of your family. Please send all of their personal details including SS numbers we'll sell to criminal elements in your home country, and send a huge sum of money to us via wire transfer so we can disappear permanently with your money and leave you wondering if you have a criminal history. Well, don't worry, if you didn't before you met us, then after the pimps, hookers, drug pushers, and mobsters have their way with your identity, you will!

    Do you want to work at home? Well we here at Scamscum Data Systems are looking for a freelancer who can work at home. All you need is an internet connection, valid driver's license, and access to a DHL dropoff point. We'll have people from all around the country send you computer equipment to mail here to Nigeria. We'll send you a check which will bounce later, and you'll ship all these awesome MacBooks and portable hard drives and things to us, we will use them to triple our current output of listings and emails and then you'll be out all that money.

    Are you looking to make $700 a week just by running errands? You're hired. Now we will send you to Western Union offices to collect money that we scammed off other people, and then have you keep a little and re-wire it to us. Because everyone thinks people in Nigeria are scammers, we decided to sell our fake cars and computers and pretend we are soldier's wives or something and unable to do the transaction in person due to being afraid of the internet. Sound good? When can you start?
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  • Profile picture of the author DogScout
    In 2 weeks, He could have been in a country where %700/mo allows one to live like a king. His BIGGEST negligence was not taking the 2 week widow of opportunity to leave. Lol.

    (Actually, don't mind me, I used to rob banks for a living...)
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  • Profile picture of the author Kevin_Hutto
    Here is another less less less obvious lesson.

    Like the OP said, that the bank can say the funds are valid when they are not...

    Well here is another version of that:

    If you sell anything higher end you have to be careful of this one:

    The canceled cashier's check.

    Someone pays you with a REAL cashiers check. You give them the merchandise and deposit said check only to find out that they had cancelled payment on the check.

    Many people dont realize it, but a cashier's check can be cancelled just like a regular check can. So, just because its certified funds doesnt always mean that something fishy isnt going on.

    So if you sell anything high end like that, make sure you get a money order or cash. You cant cancel either one of those.
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    • Profile picture of the author PatriciaJ
      Unfortunately they wouldn't bother sending them out if they didn't work. The scams play on the greed of recipients wanting to believe that they will get money for nothing.

      The latest twist to the 419 scam is targeting victims of the scams, subject line:

      Scam Victims - ( Contact Mr. Michael Bolts )

      From Mrs. Cynthia Steele claiming that she has received compensation funds of $1,500,000.00 with the help of Mr. Michael Bolts and it only cost her $400 for the paperwork blah blah blah

      some sick puppies out there
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  • Profile picture of the author Kris Weber
    I always feel bad when I get one of those type of emails, because I know that by pure chance there has to be at least one person out there that falls for the hundreds of thousand emails they send out.

    I mean, you could think that most people are already aware of these cliché scam emails, but most are not. Why is there never any campaigns or PSA's on internet fraud, scams and other e-crime in general. It's very disappointing that people's lives are being ruined right now through these scams, while we could raise awareness in such simple ways.
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  • Profile picture of the author ivanadee
    Yeaa...
    I have ever received scams like that..
    I guess, people keep falling for that because of the thought "make money quick"
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  • Profile picture of the author derekwong28
    There are some aspects of this story that doesn't make sense

    1. I can understand that the receiving may not be at fault but surely the cheque issuing bank do have some liability? It is their cheque and it is they who are responsible for checking the authenticity before sending the money.

    2. Just how did the scammer get a cheque belonging to a current account that have more than $800,000? Very few rich people or even companies would keep that sum of money in a no/low interest current account.
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    • Profile picture of the author enterpryzman
      Originally Posted by derekwong28 View Post

      There are some aspects of this story that doesn't make sense

      1. I can understand that the receiving may not be at fault but surely the cheque issuing bank do have some liability? It is their cheque and it is they who are responsible for checking the authenticity before sending the money.

      2. Just how did the scammer get a cheque belonging to a current account that have more than $800,000? Very few rich people or even companies would keep that sum of money in a no/low interest current account.



      They get checks by stealing mail and those that steal the mail then sell the checks or more importantly they sell the account #'s which are then used to replace the account #'s on real bank checks that look very official ( because they are ) and they lastly change the dollar figures displayed on the check.

      This could easily be tracked by companies such as Western Union ( only an example ) that are used to wire the change back to the person who sent the check to scam someone.

      Some real person appears to collect the money, arrest them and it's over.


      You can read all about this on the FTC website in America.

      Enterpryzman
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  • Profile picture of the author espresso
    it could be worse
    there was a case here in Ireland 3 years ago where a man was scamed and then went to africa to try and find the scam artists

    The Irish Times - Wed, Oct 31, 2007 - Irish hostage rescued in Ghana
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  • Profile picture of the author jayman
    I once got a call from a guy who said I have won a yacht and a BMW in some contest I don't remember I ever entered and want me to wired him $5K to clear the winnings.

    I told the guy, just take the yacht and cash it, pay my $5K and keep the rest. And only send over the BMW to me, I told him in a serious tone like I realty mean it. He was lost for words, probably a newly trained scammer. I have had several similar calls throughout the years and are finding it quite fun playing with them
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    • Profile picture of the author Kim Standerline
      Reminds me of the odd dirty fone call I used to get

      I gave as good as I got, (I've got a filthy mouth when I want:rolleyes and in the end they hung up on me

      I don't get them now, maybe word got round lol

      Kim

      Originally Posted by jayman View Post

      I once got a call from a guy who said I have won a yacht and a BMW in some contest I don't remember I ever entered and want me to wired him $5K to clear the winnings.

      I told the guy, just take the yacht and cash it, pay my $5K and keep the rest. And only send over the BMW to me, I told him in a serious tone like I realty mean it. He was lost for words, probably a newly trained scammer. I have had several similar calls throughout the years and are finding it quite fun playing with them
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  • Profile picture of the author Cardsearch
    I had three different people on Craigs list try to scam me. I took the worthless checks to the bank and they agreed they were worthless, but what upsets me is that they never do anything about it. just told me to rip up the checks.
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  • Profile picture of the author LB
    Similar things (to a degree) have happened to people on ebay who deposit cashier's checks with their banks who are told that the funds have cleared only to later find out it was a scam and they are now out the funds and the goods.

    This often involves "check washing" in which real checks are stolen and then "washed" of their old info and then new info is entered. Real accounts, real checks, fake info.

    Things are getting rough out there, although the poor guy in this story was just foolish because of his own greed.
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  • Profile picture of the author Fritzjoerg
    Just think for a moment: Would a stranger or the Nigerian Government give you $10M to "park" in your account? In other words; would you give a stranger $10M to hold in their account somewhere in a far away country?

    This scam has been reported on in the late 80's on 60minutes and many other networks.
    Its just sad people are falling for it ...
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