99% Of The Stuff I'm Told To Do DOESN'T Work For Me...And Here's Why

20 replies
Every once in a while, I'll try something new. I'm not one of these marketers
who's stuck in his ways. Somebody gives me something to try, I'll try it. I
mean what the heck. It can't hurt, right?

So why is it that 99% of the stuff that people give me to try doesn't do a
darn thing for me? I'm talking TOTAL ZIP.

Here's the answer, and it's the very thing that everybody who creates a
product to be sold, myself included, should understand.

No matter how explicit the instructions, there is going to be a variable
that the instructions CAN'T account for.

Know what it is?

Free will.

As long as each person has free will, there are going to be differences in
the way each person goes about a process. I don't care what the process
is. If there is a human factor involved, there is always the chance that
the human will either not have enough assumed knowledge to pull it off
or something else.

For example:

Somebody gives you a solid system for coming up with some kind of ad,
whether it be for PPC or emails or whatever. The whole system can be
laid out step by step.

Doesn't matter.

If the person has to do any thought at all, such as applying the ad tactic
to his particular product (meaning he has to ultimately come up with some
original thought) then there is always the chance that he's going to do
something wrong.

But you're probably going to say, "But how come the person who gave you
the system can do it?"

Well, several reasons. The most important is that they're really familiar
with it. They know all the ins and outs. They understand all the subtleties
of the system. Sometimes these subtleties are easily transfered in the
step by step instructions. But in many cases they are not because they
go beyond the step by step instructions and into an area of intuition that
is very hard to get across.

Can the person learning the new technique someday master it? Of course
he can. Doesn't mean he will, but he can.

How?

Ah, that's where we get into more way too philosophical stuff than I want
to strain my brain with tonight.

Yes, the simpler the system, the more likely the chance that the person
using it can have success with it. The more complexities you throw into
the mix, the less chance of success.

That is why you hear about so many people buying these huge traffic
packages and coming back and saying, "I can't get traffic" and others
will get Travis Sago's simple Bum Marketing freebie and come back with,
"I made my first dollar online."

The problem is, the simple stuff usually doesn't produce dramatic incomes.

And that's why every Internet marketer isn't making 6 and 7 figures a
year, aside from the known fact that many people don't even really try.
But that's another topic altogether.

Point is this. If you're going to create an info product, please keep this
in the back of your mind. Your customers don't have the intuition that
you possess in regard to your masterpiece that you came up with. To
them, it's as foreign as a new language, and the simplest tasks may
generate the most mind boggling questions.

Be ready to answer them with something better than, "You just do."
#99% #meand #stuff #told #work
  • Profile picture of the author SullyUI
    Good point Steven. Good communication makes great products that last.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ken Preuss
    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    Yes, the simpler the system, the more likely the chance that the person
    using it can have success with it. The more complexities you throw into
    the mix, the less chance of success.

    The problem is, the simple stuff usually doesn't produce dramatic incomes.
    Bingo Steven. Welcome to my perpetual dilemma.

    I've made a sick amount of money online over the past handful of years - more than one single person should be allowed to make (in my opinion). And I say that with total humility.

    My problem? I want everyone to "get it" for themselves and succeed wildly. But the issue is exactly what you say...

    When I get really specific no one has the same exact skills as I do. To replicate what I've done to the letter would be impossible for 99.99% of people - not because they "can't" but for the sheer fact they are not me. Their circumstances, skills, ideas, beliefs, etc. are different than mine.

    On the other hand when I get really general, the perceived value goes WAY down. And I know from experience that general sells FAR less than specific sells.

    Ah well, need to find that ideal middle ground I guess.

    Well-written and thoughtful post as usual Steven.

    Best regards,
    Ken
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    A Secret to Success: Making serious money online or offline is not complex unto itself - we're the ones who complicate it. Simply sell them what they are already buying.

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    • Profile picture of the author ss442
      Exactly right Steven, and there are other issues. Folks want to live a better life. have more money and time with the family. They are willing to shell out cold hard cash time and again after being "sold" on this new "incredibly simple" cash sucking system that makes you money with little effort.

      But, the realty is, when we get home from work we're looking to relax some, and not go back to work. I can't tell you how many times I come home, spin up the HP intent upon working on a system (including one of yours) and just draw a blank!

      I have a few blogs I have been working and updating them requires shifting gears from one subject to another to add content as they age to build some substance. Again, motivation from just being worn out is telling.

      I think mindset is the key. There are times when I spend hours into the 1:30 to 2:00 am slot working to get some progress underway whether it's placing ads, writing an Ezine article, or trying to absorb new material that looks interesting because the internet is changing quickly.

      I am sure that a lot of these programs are garbage or an old system with a new twist that works or worked for that person, but probably not for everyone. I know you can take a system you have in place and quickly put it to work and make some cash, others however?????????
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      Ed Sunderland

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  • Profile picture of the author onera
    Excellent thoughts. How one implements the whole system depends on the person who is implementing it, his/her knowledge, understanding of the issue and efforts. Otherwise, everybody will get the same result and the system will become ineffective.
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    • Profile picture of the author Killer Joe
      Man, I can relate to this...

      I've had to write instruction manuals for machinery, corporate programs, and directions for consumer products found in stores like Wal-Mart, Home Depot, Pep Boys, etc.

      The one unfailing thing I learned is that everybody draws a different picture with the words you give them.

      And intellegence has nothing to do with how that picture comes out. I've seen Harvard graduates in focus groups that can't grasp concepts that 10th graders have no problem with when it comes to reading directions. It's almost spooky.

      I'm convinced that it is impossible to create a work that will be universally seen as what the author intended. Some will get it, some won't, and some will actually find a way to hurt themselves using the exact same sequence as everybody else.

      I'm just glad I was never assigned the task of explaining how a traffic light works to new drivers.

      KJ
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  • Profile picture of the author getmorebuyers
    I agree. There are some that give up too easily and don't have the fortitude that a lot of people have to stay in even when it does not seem to be working. It takes a determined person to make money online because there are days when you may feel like giving up.
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    • Profile picture of the author PotPieGirl
      Originally Posted by getmorebuyers View Post

      I agree. There are some that give up too easily and don't have the fortitude that a lot of people have to stay in even when it does not seem to be working. It takes a determined person to make money online because there are days when you may feel like giving up.

      My hubby calls it "fearlessly pig-headed and stubborn"


      Jennifer
      ~PotPieGirl
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      • Profile picture of the author Kenneth Smith
        Great post Steven.

        There is a maxim in Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) called "The Map Is Not The Territory". For example the most detailed map of New York is still not New York. Another example: the most detailed menu in a restaurant is still not the meal.

        In other words, everyone's interpretation of a topic will always be based on their own internal map of the world. You can try to account for this as much as you possibly can in your communication, but it will never be perfect.

        Kenneth
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        • Profile picture of the author PotPieGirl
          Originally Posted by Kenneth Smith View Post

          Great post Steven.

          There is a maxim in Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) called "The Map Is Not The Territory". For example the most detailed map of New York is still not New York. Another example: the most detailed menu in a restaurant is still not the meal.

          In other words, everyone's interpretation of a topic will always be based on their own internal map of the world. You can try to account for this as much as you possibly can in your communication, but it will never be perfect.

          Kenneth
          Nice!

          :::tucking this away for future use::::


          Jennifer
          ~PotPieGirl
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  • Profile picture of the author JayXtreme
    This is the one sole reason why I think there is a NEED for so many make money products... even the ones that talk about the same thing.

    Because each product will "talk" to the consumer in a different way, and some will understand the language some won't, but those that won't might understand it if it is told in a different "language" if you catch my drift..

    Waggerz' product might speak to me like I need to.. but it might not speak to Joe James in a way that resonates with him.. ya know?...

    It's really a hit and miss affair, even the simplest of instructions won't nail things down for some people...

    Peace

    Jay
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    Bare Murkage.........

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  • Profile picture of the author PotPieGirl
    Steven -

    What a wonderful post!

    I think it comes down to two mentalities tho....

    When I buy info products, I am buying education.

    I LOVE reading about other peoples experiences in internet marketing. If I get 2-3 little nuggets out of the read that stimulates that gray matter between my ears, I'm tickled. I buy to learn - not to follow. That make any sense?

    However, I feel it is very possible that many others buy info products to have an exact system to follow forever. Almost as if they are buying a job description. If it appears too difficult, or doesn't "work" after one or two tries, they're off looking for another job.

    I read something great this weekend. It was a step by step concept - very clear, very detailed. However, I'm not going to use it "as is". It got my wheels turning and gave me some great ideas on how to improve on what I'm already doing. I can't wait to test it and tweak it!

    I hope this all doesn't sound condescending because I absolutely do not intend for it to come across that way. I just think that when we buy info products, we need to keep our reasons for buying in check.

    Love your insightful posts, Steven - Keep 'em coming!

    Jennifer
    ~PotPieGirl
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  • Profile picture of the author hughbanks
    Hi Steven, you hit that nail right on the head my friend.

    Bruce Hughbanks
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      Originally Posted by tommygadget View Post

      Steven,

      I have something for you to try. Yes, step by step. PM me, no strings attached

      TomG.
      Tom, I'm going to take you up on this. I'll PM you first chance I get...as soon
      as I figure out this thing I'm currently working on that isn't working.
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      • Profile picture of the author John Henderson
        Wonderful post, Steven.

        Only on Warrior Forum could I admit that I've spent vast swathes of the last 12 years thinking about this very subject. I really am an uber-geek on this one; if I'm flicking through a book or watching a TV show, I'm just as likely to be analysing how well the message is being conveyed to me as I am actually taking in the message itself.

        On many scraps of paper around my keyboard are scribbled messages like: "People turn up with their own ideas of what they can and cannot do - this is why we have worked examples (to hand-hold through the "how") and real life applications (to demonstrate the "why")."

        I just can't 'switch off'.

        I've even bought (and attempted to read) academic textbooks on this subject, "instructional design". However -- and somewhat ironically -- the very books that are intended to teach others how to create effective learning materials are themselves long, jargon-filled, and very tough going. What a funny old world we live in. :rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author billionareHuman
    Yes that's what makes the world so interesting it is because we all have free will, new ideas generate new ideas. Imagine if we all did things exactly the same way, how boring would that be!
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  • Profile picture of the author Bujuk
    totally agree with Steven, especially for noob like me. the key (I believe) is persistence. we should never quit. we need to fine tune the system until it works. unfortunately majority of us just quit after the first trial.
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  • Profile picture of the author sam12six
    Good post, Steven. It's like old-school martial arts teachers - they wouldn't demonstrate a move, they would describe it and let the student try, then correct any weaknesses in their technique. The point is: they didn't want the student trying to copy their punch, they wanted the student to develop his own punch.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ron Kerr
    Great insight Steven. We do all look at things a little differently and therefore take slightly different actions in the same circumstances.

    One of the things I do is write software and I can sit for hours trying to create an error without success, and yet I install a program for a new client and you can almost guarantee they will create an error.
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    • Profile picture of the author Kenneth Smith
      Communication is vital! So many of us think that communication is all in what we say.

      No, communication is always what the other person UNDERSTANDS what we have said.

      Communication is very rarely perfect, but it can get closer if we can learn how to put it in terms that the other person may understand.

      Kenneth
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  • Profile picture of the author Bruce NewMedia
    WOW ! Steve this is an Outstanding post....its soooo true.

    I was literally just thinking about this very subject yesterday. I've been trying to train someone to do a project for me. All I've done is recite the same process I personally used to get the optimum results. It has ALWAYS worked well for me.

    Guess what? this talented person is getting barely usable results! Drives me nuts.

    But I'm starting to realize there are TONS of little tweaks that I must be doing unconsciously that he is leaving out. Things I never thought about because they seemed so minor to me. Many are just things I would do intuitively. But they do add up and they affect the result MUCH more than I thought.

    This is a good lesson for everyone to remember.
    ______
    Bruce
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  • Profile picture of the author Mary Gallivan
    Hi Steven

    An interesting post that got me thinking.

    Step by step sounds easy in theory but it's not as simple as that. I once wrote instructions for something that I thought could easily be achieved in 10 simple steps. Those steps were simple to me because I knew what I was doing. This is were some of the difference lies. It's always easy when you know it.

    I received a number of emails saying that the steps didn't work. I stressed again to follow the steps 'exactly' as printed and in the same order.

    Same people emailed again - no good. So, I made those 10 simple steps into about 22 even simpler steps and that worked. What had often happened though was people would get to a certain step which happened to be familiar ground so went on their merry way thinking they knew what they were doing but had missed out only very tiny simple step because 'they knew best' but that one step screwed up the entire set-up process.

    How often have we been given a set of instructions for DIY furniture, for example, skip through them and then wonder why we have a handful of screws left over at the end?

    It can be the same with step by step instructions for anything.

    Others have different ways of learning. I'm one of those people who like to be physically shown step by step say, techy stuff on my computer. It doesn't matter how many printed instructions I have it just doesn't sink in as easily.

    When it comes to things like marketing I often find there's some good info in one book and some in another etc which would have helped if it was all in one place - but - that's life!

    Mary
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