Emails marketers: I've got parts A and C, but how do you do part B?

4 replies
Ok,

In most of the markets I work in, there's so much info
and such a wide range of topics that I can never run
out of follow ups and ways to split the sales funnel.

HOWEVER,

I am just about to run a campaign in a smaller niche
where although there's a fair bit of content to drum up,
I am stuck with something:

I have the lead generator report. (Part A)
I have the final product.(Part C)
I have backend affiliate products to pitch. (Part D)

...but I cannot work out Part B.

What can I follow up with via email in order to build
a relationship, but without repeating myself, sounding
too salesy or simply giving away what I want to sell?
#emails #marketers #part #parts
  • Profile picture of the author Kelly Verge
    Nuggets.

    Take a nugget of information and flesh it out into a couple of paragraphs.

    Your subscribers will likely be happier with brief emails than novels, anyway.
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    • Profile picture of the author Nick Brighton
      Originally Posted by Kelly Verge View Post

      Nuggets.

      Take a nugget of information and flesh it out into a couple of paragraphs.

      Your subscribers will likely be happier with brief emails than novels, anyway.
      Good point. I've got lots of 'em to share when I think about it. I just don't want to end up sending 30 emails and collectively give out what I intended to sell.

      Niche marketing is hard!
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      • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
        Nick, what you need is an AR series based on the product and/or niche.

        For example, for one of my products, which is a comprehensive home
        study course, I have a 52 week series where I cover a different topic each
        week. It gives enough info to be useful, but not so much that they don't
        have to buy the product associated with it.

        It's a fine balancing act and does take some time to perfect.

        Too much info, they don't buy.

        Too little info, they opt out.

        It is a very fine line. Naturally, the more info your product has in it, the
        more info you can give in your AR series.
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        • Profile picture of the author Nick Brighton
          Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

          Nick, what you need is an AR series based on the product and/or niche.

          For example, for one of my products, which is a comprehensive home
          study course, I have a 52 week series where I cover a different topic each
          week. It gives enough info to be useful, but not so much that they don't
          have to buy the product associated with it.

          It's a fine balancing act and does take some time to perfect.

          Too much info, they don't buy.

          Too little info, they opt out.

          It is a very fine line. Naturally, the more info your product has in it, the
          more info you can give in your AR series.
          Yeah, it's one of the things that stumps me in smaller markets. As I say, no probs in big industries, but the smaller niches and it's like trying to tight rope on a strand of hair.
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  • Profile picture of the author indexphp
    Talk to them. Send them videos, pdf's, valuable things. Show them that you are looking out for their best interests. Let them see who you are. Offer them things. etc... etc...
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