Paul Myers Is Teaching and If You Ain't Listenin' Then You Too Could Be An Idiot.

15 replies
Site scrappers, content thieves, content spinners, and other losers:

Take Heed. Content on the internet is not in the public domain.

Mr. Myers' latest email is a succint and on point message to all ethical and honorable people, who think that content available on the internet is free for the taking.

I would copy and paste his cogent message here but that would be exactly what he was talking about.

If you are on his list, then you should read it soon. Take it to heart. Believe that repercussions eventually catch up to the people who victimize others and their hard work. I have found that the longer it takes for that to happen, the worse it is when the "spit hits the fan" as Mr. Myers says.

Many people mistake Google as the "god" of rulemaking for the internet. Some day you may find that there are copyright laws in all countries, and they could all come down on your head some day. That would be a heavy crown to wear.

So, read Paul Myers piece or, maybe he will post it here as a public service.

He always says to send you here: http://www.talkbiz.com/?page=1

So, go there and get on his list, especially if you are a newbie ... and even moreso if you are an idiot.

TB
#idiot #listenin #myers #paul #teaching
  • Profile picture of the author Rob Howard
    hahaha, he is probably referring to the idiot at Cooks Source (hereby known as "crooks source"), who had an errant believe that anything published online was public domain!

    Rob
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Donovan
    Originally Posted by teaball View Post

    So, go there and get on his list, especially if you are a newbie ... and even moreso if you are an idiot.
    Good advice, but I'm not sure that last line quite reads as intended..


    Frank
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    • Profile picture of the author Tina Golden
      and even moreso if you are an idiot
      The problem here is that rarely does an idiot KNOW that they're an idiot.

      Tina
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    • Profile picture of the author teaball
      Originally Posted by Frank Donovan View Post

      Good advice, but I'm not sure that last line quite reads as intended..


      Frank
      Frank,
      Idiots are not beyond hope. They too can learn to be better, honorable and more importantly, learn to do their own work!
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  • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
    I hope Paul posts it here, since that would be awesome, for warriors to read.

    Caleb
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    Canadian Expat Living in Medellin, Colombia

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    • Profile picture of the author bretski
      Originally Posted by Caleb Spilchen View Post

      I hope Paul posts it here, since that would be awesome, for warriors to read.

      Caleb
      I'd flag it as self-promotion which might get him in a bit of a pickle... would suck to have to warn yourself or give yourself a stern talking to... KIDDING!

      I'm on his list. That's probably the easiest way to learn from the dude...
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      • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
        Originally Posted by bretski View Post

        I'd flag it as self-promotion which might get him in a bit of a pickle... would suck to have to warn yourself or give yourself a stern talking to... KIDDING!

        I'm on his list. That's probably the easiest way to learn from the dude...
        Have you noticed that Paul removes his sig when people as for a link to his newsletter, because he doesn't want any "self promo"..

        As Jstraw taught us you just remove the ad at the bottom and you can post the e-mail

        Caleb
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        Canadian Expat Living in Medellin, Colombia

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        • Profile picture of the author Paul Myers
          TB,

          I don't usually distribute the stuff from the newsletter to anyone but subscribers unless I turn it into a paid product. This one might be useful here, though.

          I have to say, I'm not sure about that whole, "sign up if you're an idiot" thing, though.

          Bretski,

          Nothing for sale here, and the promotion was already done by someone else.

          Anyway... the article follows...

          "Mom, Apple Pie, and ... Plagiarism?"

          This could easily qualify as an installment for the "Stupid
          Email Tricks" series. It's certainly an appropriate follow-up
          to last issue's, "Stoopid Misteaks" section.

          Seems there's this woman who wrote an article back in 2005 on
          apple pie in the Renaissance period. A friend recently told her
          it had appeared, with her byline, in a cooking magazine. Ms
          Gaudio, the writer of the piece, was somewhat surprised.

          You see, no-one had bothered to ask her permission.

          As the story is told, Ms Gaudio engaged the editor of the
          magazine (Cooks Source) via email. She asked for two things: An
          apology and a contribution of $130 to be made to the Columbia
          School of Journalism.

          That's a fairly measured response, I think. Ms Griggs, the
          editor who is said to have been on the other end of the
          exchange, expressed a somewhat different opinion. Among other
          things, she is claimed to have included this little tidbit in
          one of her replies:

          "But honestly Monica, the web is considered 'public domain'
          and you should be happy we just didn't 'lift' your whole
          article and put someone else's name on it."


          She then suggested that Ms Gaudio ought to pay HER for the
          edits the magazine made to the article.

          As it turns out, this was a Very Bad Move.

          Can you say "Nerd Rage?"

          ....

          By the way, the thing has exploded past what I've covered here
          since I started this piece. Google the phrase "Cooks Source"
          for a remarkable lesson in the power of an outraged virtual mob.

          Anyway... Back to our story.

          ....

          Ms Gaudio posted about this to her blog. Some people saw it and
          commenced to telling world+dog about the editor's nasty
          attitude and questionable journalistic practice. Bloggers
          carried the banner for her.

          And then the spit hit the fan page.

          Cooks Source went from 110 'friends' to thousands, literally
          overnight. The magazine's Facebook wall was flooded with
          comments from their new pals, none of them flattering. And the
          crowd started digging, posting links to alleged examples of
          copying by Cooks Source from The Food Network, CNN, Martha
          Stewart Living, NPR, and dozens of other sources.

          Advertisers started to drop their placements.

          The story hit Time Magazine's "NewsFeed" column, the
          Washington Post, the Guardian, and the Los Angeles Times. So
          far. Cooks Source pulled their phone number from their web
          site.

          And, if the crowd is right and there was copying from The Food
          Network, Martha Stewart Living or any of the other alleged
          sources, there's a good chance the magazine will be hearing
          from a blather of lawyers.

          That's sort of like a murder of crows, but not as cheerful.

          ....

          Now, I'm not an attorney, so take this with whatever amount of
          salt you think appropriate.

          I suspect those publications register copyright on their
          material, which could mean rather large punitive damages if the
          magazine is sued and found to have infringed those copyrights.
          If this whole thing turns out to be true, those are some
          serious consequences. They could have been easily avoided, in
          several ways. And those are what this issue is really all
          about.

          The first is to simply not use someone else's material without
          their permission. One would think a paid editor and writer
          would have chosen that route by default. Unfortunately, even
          some experienced people have the ridiculous notion that
          everything posted on the web is public domain.

          Note that I didn't use the word 'professional' there. A pro
          would never make that claim.

          ....

          The second would have been for Ms Gaudio to register the
          copyright to her work. Then, when she found it had been used by
          the magazine, she'd have had legal grounds to go after punitive
          damages, without the very difficult process of having to prove
          actual damages. Faced with that reality, most people and
          companies will not return fire with ill-conceived and poorly
          worded retorts. They will look for ways to deal with the issue
          that don't involve defending an expensive case they can't win.

          If the recipe was up on the magazine's web site, another
          approach would have been for Ms Gaudio to file a proper DMCA
          takedown notice with their web host. That could be used in
          conjunction with any of the other responses, of course.

          Yet another would have been for the editor to have
          acknowledged the wrong, apologized, and made the requested
          donation.

          Now, I'm not suggesting that Ms Gaudio should have ever needed
          to take those kinds of steps to protect her property. She did
          nothing wrong. She found the problem and tried to address it in
          a responsible and civil fashion. And she got verbally slapped
          in the face for her courtesy.

          Rudeness online isn't all that remarkable. Sometimes it's even
          appropriate. It's not usually much of anything to get annoyed
          over. But when someone is attacked for being polite to a person
          who has demonstrably wronged them (attacking the victim), all
          bets are off.

          And the gloves come off, too.

          Nerd rage is an ugly thing.

          ....

          What's this got to do with you?

          A lot of people who do business online depend on their own
          creativity, or that of their paid employees and contractors, to
          build the content and systems that grow their businesses. And a
          lot of people steal content that belongs to others as a means
          to shorten the process.

          If you're one of the latter, there are some things you need to
          understand. The biggest being that you have no right, legally
          or ethically, to use anyone else's content, graphics, ad copy
          or other intellectual property without their express
          permission.

          We're not talking here about "fair use doctrine." Most of the
          folks using other people's work don't have the faintest clue
          how that works, and shouldn't bother trying to get around it.
          If you think that's an overstatement, Google the phrase
          "copyright trolls," without the quotes. That should give you
          nightmares.

          You don't get to use someone else's work and give them a link,
          and then claim that's all you needed to do. It isn't. You need
          permission.

          You don't get to steal someone's material and get away with it
          because they didn't put a copyright notice on it. Everything is
          copyrighted, as soon as it's rendered in a fixed medium.

          You don't get to take someone's lengthy content and just
          reword it with impunity, without changing the structure or the
          ideas and techniques. If you believe that's okay, I recommend
          doing a search on the phrase "derivative work."

          You don't get to compile posts from a discussion forum into a
          product, under the idea that such posts are "public domain."
          They are not.

          If you doubt any of this, I recommend talking to a good
          intellectual property lawyer before doing this stuff. It's a
          lot cheaper than the lawsuits you could end up facing.

          Not to mention the consequences of violating the "angry
          villager" rule.

          ....

          If you're a content creator, there are some things you will
          want to keep in mind. The first is that you simply can't keep
          100% control over your content. There are countries that just
          don't care about copyright in any way that matters. And there
          will always be people who can hide better than you can seek.

          Get used to the idea.

          What can you do? First, you can register your work with the
          copyright office in your country. I can't speak for the rest of
          the world, but that provides a lot more leverage for creators
          in the US.

          Without that registration, you can only legally expect/hope to
          get infringers to stop using your material, and possibly sue
          for actual damages. Those are notoriously difficult to quantify
          and prove. With the registration, you can also sue for punitive
          damages, which can be significant. That's a much more effective
          deterrent to would-be thieves.

          You can register copyrights in the US quite inexpensively
          online, at http://www.copyright.gov/eco/

          If you find someone using your content online without your
          permission, you have several options. The simplest is to send
          their web host a properly constructed 'DMCA takedown notice.'
          (Google that phrase for an explanation and instructions.)

          You can also have your attorney send them a cease and desist
          letter, if a simple request for removal of the infringing
          material doesn't work.

          You can expect one of a few over-used responses most of the
          time. The most common will be some variant of the editor's
          response above: "It's alright to use it, since it was posted on
          Teh Interwebs." If you get that response, stop talking to the
          person and escalate. They're convinced they're right, because
          they read it somewhere online.

          Another very common response will be, "I paid someone to
          create the content for me, and had no idea they copied it."
          Sometimes that's just a convenient lie, but it's also sometimes
          true. If you pay people from some countries to write or design
          graphics for you, you're almost as likely as not to get stolen
          content for your money. It's somewhat less likely for
          contractors in North America and much of Europe, but it's still
          more common than you'd think.

          It can be difficult to monitor this. One step you can take to
          reduce your risk of getting stolen content from workers is to
          provide your writers or designers with very clear outlines for
          what you want, and make sure they stay close to those
          specifications.

          Another is to check the delivered product using
          http://www.copyscape.com (You can also use that site to look
          for people stealing your content online.)

          There's no way to be certain that you're not paying someone
          who's just copying another's work and taking your money for it,
          but some vigilance can reduce the odds significantly.

          If you're outsourcing to another country, contracts aren't
          likely to help. If you're hiring within your own country, I
          recommend getting a lawyer to draft a contract that specifies
          that all work must be original, that it's a work for hire
          (which means you own the copyright), and that the contractor
          agrees to indemnify you if they deliver infringing work.

          That last one may be meaningless if you get sued and can't
          collect from the contractor, but that's why you need to talk to
          a competent contract attorney.

          It's worth the effort.

          ....

          If you create your own content, it's easy. Just don't copy
          someone else. At all.

          That doesn't protect you completely. There are all sorts of
          games being played online, including some in which a person
          ends up being sued by an infringer. That one can be beaten by
          simply registering the copyright to your work, before someone
          else takes it and registers it themselves.

          Yeah. That happens.

          What can I say? The world is full of thieving scumbags, who'll
          do anything at all to grab someone else's work or money. And
          they're not all as obvious as spammers, identity thieves, or
          pickpockets.

          The biggest thing you can do to protect your intellectual
          property is to be aware of the issues. Spend a little time
          reading on these subjects, even if it's just a half hour or so
          each week. Or get a book on copyright and trademark topics, and
          read it from cover to cover. That won't make you an expert (or
          even close to it), but it will help you to know where the
          pitfalls might be.

          That can make all the difference.

          Be careful out there.
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          • Profile picture of the author thatgirlJ
            Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post


            A lot of people who do business online depend on their own
            creativity, or that of their paid employees and contractors, to
            build the content and systems that grow their businesses. And a
            lot of people steal content that belongs to others as a means
            to shorten the process.

            I just wanted to highlight this. I'm sad to say that I've hired people I trusted to write content for me. A simple paste into CopyScape showed me they'd just lifted the majority of the content. Sometimes, it's just ignorance. A lot of people don't understand that "research" is not just rewriting someone else's words (or using it as-is!).

            I'm a ghostwriter, so I have to stick up for my 'peeps (LOL!)...but you can never be too careful when contracting work. Even when you think the person you're hiring is a friend/trustworthy/whatever. Some people have their "rules" scrambled. Others are just insanely lazy and don't care

            Copyscape Premium is super-duper cheap. It helps!
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            • Profile picture of the author teaball
              Originally Posted by Jenn Dize View Post

              Copyscape Premium is super-duper cheap. It helps!
              Since you mentioned Copyscape, a fine service, I thought I'd mention a service too.

              Not affiliated at all ... just a pleased user. OK?

              ArtistScope is another way to secure graphics and text. it's pricey for someone just starting out on a budget, but very effective.

              I use it inside membership sites for all of my content. I create all of my content and tons of it each day.

              I require all subs to download their browser plug-in. If they don't want to, I just refund them and say, "Thank you, and Adios!"

              The browser plug-in prevents all screenshots, screen capture software, right click drags, etc. Works with any browser. Very effective.

              Yeah, sure, somebody can copy by typing, but that would mean alot of work every single day... and I know people are lazy!

              The hidden benefit is this: You don't have to charge an arm and a leg for subscriptions because your content is secure and is kept exclusive. You get more subs who love you because you are great and cheap.

              It works on all media, CD, DVD, .pdf files, html.....

              ArtistScope Copy Protection, Image Encryption and Digital Rights Management

              Try looking at it.

              TB
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          • Profile picture of the author teaball
            Originally Posted by Paul Myers View Post

            TB,

            I don't usually distribute the stuff from the newsletter to anyone but subscribers unless I turn it into a paid product. This one might be useful here, though.

            I have to say, I'm not sure about that whole, "sign up if you're an idiot" thing, though.


            ....

            If you create your own content, it's easy. Just don't copy
            someone else. At all.

            That doesn't protect you completely. There are all sorts of
            games being played online, including some in which a person
            ends up being sued by an infringer. That one can be beaten by
            simply registering the copyright to your work, before someone
            else takes it and registers it themselves.

            Yeah. That happens.

            What can I say? The world is full of thieving scumbags, who'll
            do anything at all to grab someone else's work or money. And
            they're not all as obvious as spammers, identity thieves, or
            pickpockets.

            The biggest thing you can do to protect your intellectual
            property is to be aware of the issues. Spend a little time
            reading on these subjects, even if it's just a half hour or so
            each week. Or get a book on copyright and trademark topics, and
            read it from cover to cover. That won't make you an expert (or
            even close to it), but it will help you to know where the
            pitfalls might be.

            That can make all the difference.

            Be careful out there.

            I'm glad you did post it. Most idiocy is behavior, not a static hopeless state.

            So, I hope folks will heed your words. Building a business is a long tailed process, either online or offline. It pays to be really good at something that people want to buy.

            Again, I'm glad you posted up (I thought you would, as any good marketer would).

            TB
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            The short cut to success is always the long cut for lasting success.
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  • Profile picture of the author Supernatural_fan
    this happened to me as well..i written some articles that not only didn't got paid by an online employer of mine, but were also stolen by him. copyright issues seem so complicated for me. I wouldn't even know where to start. and it seems that many do not fear copyright laws at all. what then? ( this is more of a rhetoric question as i don't have the time or the nerves to deal with that) i'll have a look on that site..thanks!
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  • Profile picture of the author ikosuave
    My friend actually had a page of streaming links that would get people in (tons of traffic) to watch after a re-direct to another site.

    The site got hacked and the information became very easily accessible online after that.
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  • Profile picture of the author Marc Rodill
    Wow. What a pickle. I've been publishing Paul's stuff in
    my (now defunct) offline newsletter -- under the name
    "Saul Friars" -- for DECADES! Damn. Guess I'll stop now.

    Someone should have told me the Internet isn't public
    domain SOONER...

    Marc

    PS. OF COURSE I'm kidding.
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  • Profile picture of the author jasonmorgan
    You don't get to use someone else's work and give them a link,
    and then claim that's all you needed to do. It isn't. You need
    permission.
    A very common misconception I thought was worth quoting since many people who believe they are doing the right thing have been mislead by bad blogger advice.
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    I'm all about that bass.

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