28 replies
For anyone interested...Mailchimp.com (not affiliate link) now gives you the ability to store 1000 free email address that you can send up to 6000 messages to a month for FREE!!!

For anyone that is looking to build their list, but wants to hold off on spending money off the bat for a paid service (aweber, constantcontact, getresponse) this may be right up your alley.

This may be old news to some; however I just found out about this. Pretty cool I thought. The last time I was there is was free for 500 so they doubled the amount you can add and send.

I hope it helps
Craig
#build a list #email marketing #list building #mailchimp
  • Profile picture of the author Social Experts
    Woo sweet. Mailchimp seems to be getting better and better
    Signature

    Chill.

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2911562].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Greg D
    It is a great find. Some know, some don't.

    Only thing why the setup is free is there is a Mailchimp logo and link on the bottom of every email on the 'free' account.

    If that doesn't bother you, then go for it, free is great.

    Nice share.

    Greg
    Signature
    Premium Wordpress Directory Theme
    No Other Directory Theme Compares
    Premium Wordpress Adspace Plugin
    All On Site Advertising On Autopilot
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2911571].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author J Bold
    I agree with Jeremy. Don't go there. Pay for it. It's well worth it to pay for something reliable and that actually likes affiliate marketing. Mailchimp doesn't.

    Do some research on autoresponders like aweber, getresponse, imnica, etc. and then pick the one that looks best.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2911600].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Greg D
    There is a thread I read recently (in the past week or 2), I wish I could find it.

    The poster talks about a white labeled version of Aweber that would hold up to 10,000 in the account for $20 a month.

    I am sorry I cannot find it. Buying is better. I was just letting people know about the ad in the emails for the free Mailchimp account.

    Greg
    Signature
    Premium Wordpress Directory Theme
    No Other Directory Theme Compares
    Premium Wordpress Adspace Plugin
    All On Site Advertising On Autopilot
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2911652].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Craig Brower
      Originally Posted by Greg D View Post

      There is a thread I read recently (in the past week or 2), I wish I could find it.

      The poster talks about a white labeled version of Aweber that would hold up to 10,000 in the account for $20 a month.

      I am sorry I cannot find it. Buying is better. I was just letting people know about the ad in the emails for the free Mailchimp account.

      Greg
      I believe its called Profollow.com, and I think that they may actually be a subsidiary of Jeff Walker/ Internet Alchemy.

      I wanted to mention Mailchimp here because its a decent deal for someone that is just getting into IM. A lot of people end up spending more than they can make at first, and I thought that using Mailchimp would be a good way to test the waters before going out and spending money that may not be getting earned yet.

      I was unaware of the fact that they may ban you for promoting the wrong way, or against their terms of service, but then again, you can get banned from anything if you are not in compliance.
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2913518].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        It makes no difference "whom you agree with", guys.

        Affiliate marketing is expressly prohibited by MailChimp's terms of service.

        Warriors have built up and suddenly lost their lists there for doing affiliate marketing.

        Whomever you "agree with", those two things both remain factual. No opinion involved in this one. Simple enough to understand, I think? It's not about "promoting the wrong way", nor about "giving people on your list the opportunity to accuse you of spamming them". This is all phooey and hot air. Either you're doing affiliate marketing or you're not: it's about as objective as you can get.

        If you're doing affiliate marketing, and you choose MailChimp as the place to build your list, then you need to have your head examined. And if the person who does the examining finds anything much in there, then he needs to have his head examined. Life is just too short for this sort of stupidity.
        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2913647].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
          The amount of mis-information in this thread with regards
          to MailChimp is staggering.

          I for one have contacted the Compliance Department of
          MailChimp for clarification on their policy regarding the
          use of affiliate links.

          I've also tested their service thoroughly for myself and
          my clients.

          Admittedly, their Terms of Service is very unclear on what
          is allowed and what isn't allowed with regards to affiliate
          links.

          Their terms of service say that affiliate marketing is not
          allowed.

          However, MailChimp DO allow affiliate links to be used for
          lists but only within a very narrow set of circumstances.

          If you're a dedicated affiliate marketer who has a list for
          the sole purpose of promoting other businesses - then you
          are better off using a provider other than MailChimp because
          they do not allow this type of affiliate marketing.

          However, if you primarily promote your own products and
          services and that is the primary purpose of your list, then
          you are actually allowed to use occassional affiliate links
          for other third parties.

          Their terms of service is unclear on the subject of affiliate
          links which is why I sought advice direct from the source
          (rather than hearsay on a forum).

          According to MailChimp's Compliance Department, the
          occassional use of affiliate links are allowed if they are
          not the primary purpose of your list.

          So, I can send out a newsletter talking about my products
          and services and then recommend a vendor within it via an
          affiliate link, provided that's not the sole focus of the e-mail.

          So hardcore affiliate marketers are best to look elsewhere.

          But if you focus on selling your own products and services
          primarily, then MailChimp is fine with the occassional use of
          affiliate links.

          I actually like their Terms of Service because it keeps away
          some users who can have a negative affect on the reputation
          and deliverability of their servers.

          Dedicated to your success,

          Shaun
          Signature

          .

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2913701].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
            Originally Posted by Shaun OReilly View Post

            According to MailChimp's Compliance Department, the occassional use of affiliate links are allowed if they are not the primary purpose of your list.
            Shaun: Thank you for the research. However, the quote above is entirely too
            subjective, at least for me. It's a thin line between "occassional" and "frequent"
            and "primary" and "secondary." On top of that, the only opinion that truly matters
            is that of Mailchimp. I can define my frequency as "occassional," but I'm screwed
            if they think otherwise.

            I'd rather not leave the viability of my greatest asset up to squabbles over definitions.
            Thus, I have to agree with Alexa on this one.

            Of course, Mailchimp could possibly be a viable option for marketers who do not
            do any affiliate marketing.
            Signature

            Raising a child is akin to knowing you're getting fired in 18 years and having to train your replacement without actively sabotaging them.

            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2913908].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
              Originally Posted by Dan Riffle View Post

              Shaun: Thank you for the research. However, the quote above is entirely too
              subjective, at least for me. It's a thin line between "occassional" and "frequent"
              and "primary" and "secondary." On top of that, the only opinion that truly matters
              is that of Mailchimp. I can define my frequency as "occassional," but I'm screwed
              if they think otherwise.

              I'd rather not leave the viability of my greatest asset up to squabbles over definitions.
              Thus, I have to agree with Alexa on this one.

              Of course, Mailchimp could possibly be a viable option for marketers who do not
              do any affiliate marketing.
              I agree that the boundaries on the permitted use of
              affiliate links is unclear.

              That's why I contacted MailChimp's Compliance Department
              rather than relying on a mixture of informed and uninformed
              views elsewhere on the net including here.

              Here's the conclusion from the support ticket exchanges:

              If you send a campaign, the content of the campaign must be yours. If you are sending to your contacts from example.com, then the content of your campaigns must reflect this domain. Essentially, the email must be a example.com email, not an email from you that is about an entirely different product or company.

              However, in the content of your newsletter, you may include these affiliate links. So, if in your email you are talking about example.com material and you mention "I just started using Company A and think it is AWESOME! You should totally check them out" This is fine, as long as the rest of your content should reflect example.com. Instead of your newsletter being a giant advertisement for another company, it is more included in the body of your example.com content as suggestions for other sites to check out.

              I hope this helps clarify everything! Basically, we do not mind you making suggestions or providing links in your campaigns, but we do not want you to send a campaign from example.com that is entirely about MailChimp or any other company or product.
              The words occassional, and primary, etc were my own
              words to describe their policy.

              If you're using good e-mail practices, then you shouldn't
              have too much to worry about with using MailChimp provided
              your products and services are the main focus of the content.

              I have established contact with people in the Compliance
              Department and will deal with them if any issues arise.

              I also have the option of importing my list into my account
              at iContact if I want to do exclusive affiliate-focused e-mails.

              I can understand some people being a bit more conservative
              and not wanting to take the risk.

              It's a choice.

              There are many advantages to MailChimp including their
              high deliverability (because of their strict policies - stricter
              than AWeber), powerful API and Social Media integration.
              Plus, they're fun to work with too.

              Dedicated to your success,

              Shaun
              Signature

              .

              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2914085].message }}
              • Profile picture of the author Dan Riffle
                Originally Posted by Shaun OReilly View Post

                I agree that the boundaries on the permitted use of
                affiliate links is unclear...

                ...If you're using good e-mail practices, then you shouldn't
                have too much to worry about with using MailChimp provided
                your products and services are the main focus of the content.

                Dedicated to your success,

                Shaun
                (Quote edited for simplicity)

                Shaun, again thank you for sharing your research. I run clean email lists
                and this policy still scares me, but that's me. I'm conservative by nature.

                I wouldn't recommend the service to others when there are other services
                available that do not raise this concern, but I can see your point.

                ~Dan
                Signature

                Raising a child is akin to knowing you're getting fired in 18 years and having to train your replacement without actively sabotaging them.

                {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2914379].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author kenny5
    I've used Mailchimp in the past and in my opinion paying the $20 or so for aweber or something else is worth it, I hated Mailchimp and there is always the chance they will ban your account.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2911672].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Alexandre Valois
    Let me bust the myth here.

    Mailchimp has absolutely nothing against promoting to your list. What they frown upon is setting up lists only to push affiliate products and bank on commissions, but any intelligent marketer building a real business will have no problem with that.

    If you only create niche wordpress blogs and push affiliate products left and right, or use landing pages to pre-sell clickbank products... Mailchimp is not an option and they are clear about that.

    But as long as you build a legitimate business, offer a product, follow up support, a newsletter, and recommend other products once in a while, you're clear by MailChimp's standard. And I got this from talking to one of their rep after reading the big scare posts everywhere on this board.

    Just be careful as there IS a list of products and sites that they will not accept on the network, such as get-rich-quick schemes...

    As far as I'm concerned, they provide a smart service, great features that I haven't been able to find anywhere else, and at a good rate and have become my n.1 autoresponder service.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2911687].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author James Campbell
      Originally Posted by Alexandre Valois View Post

      ...but any intelligent marketer building a real business will have no problem with that.
      Who says that building a list and promoting to it isn't a "real business"?

      In fact there are 1000's of companies that do just that, and they are "real businesses".

      Some people thinking that selling information online isn't a "real business", some people think that lead generation and then marketing to those leads isn't a "real business", but truth is, they are ALL real businesses.

      Just keep that in mind.

      James
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2914713].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author jewin
    I agree with Alexandre here. Mailchimp does a great job on their backend. Offer value to your audience, don't pummel them with crap offers and you'll be fine. I use MailChimp for 4 separate lists and its done well for me.
    Signature
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2911799].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Bane
    Also in agreement with Alexandre - and in my experience the only people with bad experiences are ones that were burning their lists to the ground with any affiliate link they could find that was even remotely related to the point of the list.

    If you don't give reason for your users to report you for spam, you do not get removed from the service - it's that simple.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2911821].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author marshallbailey
    How does Mail Chimp know what your sending your list???

    Do they read the emails you send your list???
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2913676].message }}
    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by marshallbailey View Post

      How does Mail Chimp know what your sending your list???

      Do they read the emails you send your list???
      It doesn't matter. :rolleyes:

      No affiliate marketer in their right mind is going to build their business's list (their most valuable business asset, right?!?!), in a place where affiliate marketing is expressly prohibited by the terms of service! :rolleyes:
      {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2913689].message }}
      • Profile picture of the author Mohammad Afaq
        And just for the recoded guys, I once contacted mail chimp because another warrior member said Mail chimp allows affiliate marketing despite for the fact that i showed him their TOS.

        I cannot find the thread i started back then but their response was simply on the lines of "No affiliate link"
        Signature

        “The first draft of anything is shit.” ~Ernest Hemingway

        {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2913710].message }}
        • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
          Originally Posted by Mohammad Afaq View Post

          And just for the recoded guys, I once contacted mail chimp because another warrior member said Mail chimp allows affiliate marketing despite for the fact that i showed him their TOS.

          I cannot find the thread i started back then but their response was simply on the lines of "No affiliate link"
          Did you contact MailChimp support or the MailChimp
          Compliance Department who are specifically in charge
          of what is and what isn't acceptable?

          I had to contact their Compliance Department - multiple
          times - before I got a bit more clarity on what their policy
          is with regards to affiliate links.

          What I've stated is direct from the people within MailChimp
          who are responsible for enforcing their Terms of Service -
          their Compliance Department.

          Part of the challenge is that their position is unclear unless
          you do more digging.

          Dedicated to your success,

          Shaun
          Signature

          .

          {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2913751].message }}
          • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
            Banned
            Originally Posted by Shaun OReilly View Post

            Part of the challenge is that their position is unclear unless you do more digging.
            I'm really very, very surprised to hear this, Shaun. I just looked myself at their terms of service. There's a list of things that are prohibited, and one of the items says, quite simply and plainly, "affiliate marketing".

            I see no ambiguity there at all, and no unclear boundaries.

            Clearly there's nothing to stop anyone contacting them, for themselves. But that, together with the threads I've read here started by Warriors who have built up a list there and suddenly lost it, would certainly be more than enough to put me off.

            It's a choice, as you say.
            {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2914092].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Caleb Spilchen
              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              I'm really very, very surprised to hear this, Shaun. I just looked myself at their terms of service. There's a list of things that are prohibited, and one of the items says, quite simply and plainly, "affiliate marketing".

              I see no ambiguity there at all, and no unclear boundaries.

              Clearly there's nothing to stop anyone contacting them, for themselves. But that, together with the threads I've read here started by Warriors who have built up a list there and suddenly lost it, would certainly be more than enough to put me off.

              It's a choice, as you say.
              This other thing thats off limits also got
              me wondering...

              • Get-rich-quick or work-at-home schemes
              Would some of the offers that are wso's be
              work at home schemes?

              Caleb
              Signature

              Canadian Expat Living in Medellin, Colombia

              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2914117].message }}
            • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
              The Terms of Service is very ambiguous - especially
              since all outgoing e-mails from their Forever Free
              1000 e-mail accounts MUST contain affiliate links for
              MailChimp.

              I think that they're trying to put-off certain people
              who are in industries associated with higher spam
              complaints that could ultimately affect the deliverability
              of MailChimp's servers.

              I wish they'd clarify it once and for all but I've done
              my own digging and am happy to recommend them
              to clients who meet their strict criteria.

              But hardcore affiliate marketers should go elsewhere
              for sure.

              Dedicated to your success,

              Shaun
              Signature

              .

              {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2914136].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author blueclcl
    so as long as you don't use affiliate link in the email then that's fine.

    so i can send them to my site which would then link them to an affiliate page.

    Is this OK with them

    blueclcl
    Signature
    Free cheat sheet for getting your first paying writing client on Upwork within 7 days - Learn More [/B]
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2913791].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Craig Brower
    Wow...in a way I feel a little bad for starting this thread LOL. I didn't realize any of the information being discussed as far as affiliate marketing.

    At the same time, I guess it is a good thing for people unaware of this as well, and primarily do affiliate marketing.

    I have my own products and services, as well have told some of my offline clients about Mailchimp, but they are also not affiliate marketers.

    So I do apologize to anyone this information was not the best to share with, as I was unaware of the repercussions that could happen.

    Craig
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2914027].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Vincenzo Oliva
    Thanks for that info. I was just today thinking of finding a free responder to do some testing, awesome.
    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2914141].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Istvan Horvath
    Besides profollow there is another white label "aweber" automateyourlist.com - run by Michael Rasmussen.
    Signature

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2914459].message }}
  • Profile picture of the author Nicola Lane
    If you are happy that mailchimp have no problem with your email based on your conversations with them then that is your choice.

    But I suspect that most affiliates would not find them a good fit - the list of things they don't allow is far too long!

    In addition, I don't want to take a chance that a customer service/compliance person who wasn't in on my e-mail exchange will decide to ban my account - leaving me with no autoresponder and a lost list!

    A previous thread on this subject is here:

    http://www.warriorforum.com/internet...downsides.html

    The mailchimp TOS is here:

    MailChimp Terms of Use | MailChimp.com

    Here is the relevant prohibited list from Mailchimp:

    (f) Prohibited Content and Industries

    Don't use MailChimp to send anything offensive, to promote anything illegal, or to harass anyone. You may not send:
    Pornography or other sexually explicit Emails
    Emails offering to sell illegal substances
    Emails that violate the CAN-SPAM Law

    Also, there are some industries that send certain types of content that result in higher than normal bounce rates and abuse complaints, which in turn jeopardize the deliverability of our entire system. No offense intended, but because we must ensure the highest delivery rates possible for all our customers, we do not allow businesses that offer these types of services, products, or content:
    Illegal goods or services
    Escort and dating services
    Pharmaceutical products
    Get-rich-quick or work-at-home schemes
    Online trading, day trading tips, or stock market related content
    Gambling services, products or gambling education
    Multi-level marketing
    Affiliate marketing
    Credit repair, get-out-of-debt content
    Mortgages and/or Loans
    Real estate prospecting or listing
    Nutritional Supplements, Herbal Supplements or Vitamin Supplements
    Pornography or nudity in content
    Adult novelty items or references in content
    List brokers or List rental services
    Marketing or sending commercial email without proper permission

    Generally speaking, if you're in an industry that is frequently associated with spam, you know who you are (it's probably why you're reading this far, right?). We make no judgments about your line of business, but we cannot afford to risk our deliverability. In fact, most ESPs like MailChimp will not be able to help you. You will most likely need to look into setting up your own mail servers. The term to search on is "email delivery server." There are many industrial strength MTAs to choose from with built-in delivery and reporting tools for high-volume senders.


    Hope this all helps,
    Signature

    I like to keep an open mind, but not so open that my brains fall out

    {{ DiscussionBoard.errors[2914898].message }}

Trending Topics