People won't buy, if your content doesn't provide value

27 replies
This post is going to be a bit of a rant so feel free to close it and read something else if you don't like rants

Ok, so here's a thing - often enough, when searching for something in Google, a lot of the results on the first page are douchey IM pages, who do not provide any value whatsoever to any sane person who is reading them.

Since I happen to sell stuff through internet as well, I can recognize the pattern most people on here follow easily - and see through it. Here's news to people creating those.. most people without IM experience see through that as well.

They won't buy squat from such page. Instead they will find a page with a real content, while one keyword optimized sites without any real value and fake reviews will get closed right away.

Kudos to IMers who do actually create content of value, and wouldn't you agree that content with a real value sells better?
#buy #content #people #provide
  • Not only does it sell better but seriously whats the point for promoting an affiliate product that is about to launch that's way super hyped in the sales letter only to find that it's a pretty appalling product at the end of the day and most of your affiliate sales are going to be refunded.

    Plus you'll get a bad reputation, you'll have problems getting jvs in the future if your content and product doesn't hold up.

    at the end of the day i really don't think it's worth it but a lot of these people seem to be after a 300,000 car or something.

    regards

    colleen
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  • Profile picture of the author Alex.Fields
    Look at all the big gurus online. They all provide Golden Nuggets before they launch their product. in most of the cases the the golden nuggets are far better then the actual product. but we are willing to pay money if we can use the techniques that people teach us to make even more money.

    Alex.
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      You nailed it. Once I realized that I had to provide value to the consumer when I write my articles, website content, reviews etc that's when I started making money.

      Most newbies will write their content trying to sell something to the reader. Consumers can detect this and won't buy your stuff. Provide value, think of the consumer first. Think what they would want out of this piece of content and give it to them in an honest manner. Once you start doing this you will start converting sales.

      Cheers
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    • Profile picture of the author Matt Ausin
      Originally Posted by Alex.Fields View Post

      Look at all the big gurus online. They all provide Golden Nuggets before they launch their product. in most of the cases the the golden nuggets are far better then the actual product. but we are willing to pay money if we can use the techniques that people teach us to make even more money.

      Alex.
      Honestly I don't see how this is relevant.
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  • Profile picture of the author scrofford
    Originally Posted by MattWrites View Post

    This post is going to be a bit of a rant so feel free to close it and read something else if you don't like rants

    Ok, so here's a thing - often enough, when searching for something in Google, a lot of the results on the first page are douchey IM pages, who do not provide any value whatsoever to any sane person who is reading them.

    Since I happen to sell stuff through internet as well, I can recognize the pattern most people on here follow easily - and see through it. Here's news to people creating those.. most people without IM experience see through that as well.

    They won't buy squat from such page. Instead they will find a page with a real content, while one keyword optimized sites without any real value and fake reviews will get closed right away.

    Kudos to IMers who do actually create content of value, and wouldn't you agree that content with a real value sells better?
    I don't agree...For example, if you have a killer sales letter, you could wrap up a turd and sell millions of them...not to say you wouldn't get all chargebacks, but the point is that yes good content is what should be there, it's the words used to create a desire and a hunger to whomever is reading about whatever it is that is being sold.

    I have seen sites that had massive good content and nothing was being sold. I have also seen sites and products that suck and the sales page was awesome, and the product was selling like hotcakes.

    Valuable content is important...I agree...I am just saying that it isn't always the defining factor of sales.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dave Rodman
      Banned
      A lot of people aren't capable of creating really good content. Either because they don't actually have any good ideas or because they are bad at communicating. Some people have such great ideas and can communicate them, that creating really good content (outside of a pre-launch) is kind of a waste of time...or a bad ROI.

      A guy like shoemoney.com is a good example of someone who started with great content and expanded into other businesses.
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    • Profile picture of the author jan roos
      Originally Posted by scrofford View Post

      I don't agree...For example, if you have a killer sales letter, you could wrap up a turd and sell millions of them...not to say you wouldn't get all chargebacks, but the point is that yes good content is what should be there, it's the words used to create a desire and a hunger to whomever is reading about whatever it is that is being sold.

      I have seen sites that had massive good content and nothing was being sold. I have also seen sites and products that suck and the sales page was awesome, and the product was selling like hotcakes.

      Valuable content is important...I agree...I am just saying that it isn't always the defining factor of sales.
      I don't think he was talking about sales letters in this post. I think he is mainly talking about regular website, blog content and articles etc. Sales letters and copywriting is a different ball game all together and yes, the point there is to try and sell and sell well.

      For those who knows copywriting techniques well it can be used very effectively in regular website, blog or article content which is why copywriting is probably the most valuable IM skill to learn.

      If you don't understand copywriting then don't try and blatantly sell in your content and it's better to take a different approach and think of the customer first when writing.

      Cheers
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  • Profile picture of the author marcuslim
    It's usually not a good idea to sell too hard or push too hard, cause you end up pushing customers away...but just be upfront and list the benefits of the product, and show them how it can provide value to them. The thing is that it is possible to trick someone with flashy hyped up marketing once, but they won't come back again for a second time!
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    • Profile picture of the author Crew Chief
      Originally Posted by MattWrites View Post

      Kudos to IMers who do actually create content of value, and wouldn't you agree that content with a real value sells better?
      Matt, a number of critical questions to ponder...

      (a). Who determines what content is valuable and what content is poop?
      (b). If you write what you believe is great content but a person with a much higher IQ than yours, views what you believe to be great content and condemns it as being the worse content they have ever laid their eyes on, how would "You" adjudicate such an issue?
      (c). If a person with a lower IQ than yours, reads what you believe to be poop content and asserts that it is a literary Picasso, how do you pontificate your perspective without seeming linearly dogmatic?
      (d). If you pose a dissenting view on the particular value of a page of content, who's opinion are we to accept and acknowledge? Yours? The content provider? A third party who loves the content? Or a third party who hates the content like you do?
      (e). Since it seems as though you are clearly grading content, should your grading system become ubiquitous Internet wide? Or do you see a need to establish a ICGC Internet Content Grading Committee that is empowered with the authority to de-index web pages you believe do not meet your standards of content with a real value?
      (f). Can you say beyond a shadow of a doubt that your assessment of any and all content is without a scintilla of opinion, prejudice and/or subjectivity?
      (g). In your grading system, do you arbitrarily reject the content of individuals who have yet to master the English language?
      (h). In your grading system, do you arbitrarily reject the content of novice writers, interns and others who are just starting off writing and just starting off providing content?
      (i). In your rant, you used the term, "Content of Value" as you know, rating any content boils down to being nothing more than a subjective matter. That said, the next set of questions are related directly to those who possibly would be assigned with grading content. In your mind...
      (1). What should the educational level of the graders be?
      (2). Should the content graders only be accepted if they are from Ivy League schools? Or will graduates from state colleges be acceptable?
      (3). What will be the minimum IQ of those determining if content is of value or not?
      (4). Should content graders be required to posses PhDs? MBAs? And what exactly should their major(s) be?
      (5). Are those without college degrees precluded from determining if content has value or not?
      (6). Are teenagers allowed to provide their perspective of whether the content is of value or not?
      (7). Is a person that only graduated from a technical school less qualified to access the value of content than say a IVY League school graduate?
      (8). Is a person who graduated with a degree in American Studies or English Literature less capable of determining the value of content than say someone who graduated with a degree in Civil Engineering or Chemical Engineering?
      Just a few things to think about before anyone starts dogmatically asserting what they believe is content of value versus poop content.

      Opinions vary...

      Originally Posted by MattWrites View Post

      ...wouldn't you agree that content with a real value sells better?
      Does this answer your question?




      Giles, the Crew Chief
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      • Profile picture of the author Matt Ausin
        What the hell were these questions all about? Honestly, I feel flattered that you took the time to type them out, but why?

        To make a point that the value of content is a subjective matter? Doesn't everyone know that already?

        I was merely saying that people who don't know squat about the stuff they're selling, shouldn't sell it. Period.

        I mean, really. Doesn't matter if you're Ivy League or whatnot, for example, if you have never traded Forex, what possible value can you give to people looking to buy a FX product?
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      • Profile picture of the author oneplusone
        Originally Posted by Crew Chief View Post

        Matt, a number of critical questions to ponder...

        (a). Who determines what content is valuable and what content is poop?
        (b). If you write what you believe is great content but a person with a much higher IQ than yours, views what you believe to be great content and condemns it as being the worse content they have ever laid their eyes on, how would "You" adjudicate such an issue?
        (c). If a person with a lower IQ than yours, reads what you believe to be poop content and asserts that it is a literary Picasso, how do you pontificate your perspective without seeming linearly dogmatic?
        (d). If you pose a dissenting view on the particular value of a page of content, who's opinion are we to accept and acknowledge? Yours? The content provider? A third party who loves the content? Or a third party who hates the content like you do?
        (e). Since it seems as though you are clearly grading content, should your grading system become ubiquitous Internet wide? Or do you see a need to establish a ICGC Internet Content Grading Committee that is empowered with the authority to de-index web pages you believe do not meet your standards of content with a real value?
        (f). Can you say beyond a shadow of a doubt that your assessment of any and all content is without a scintilla of opinion, prejudice and/or subjectivity?
        (g). In your grading system, do you arbitrarily reject the content of individuals who have yet to master the English language?
        (h). In your grading system, do you arbitrarily reject the content of novice writers, interns and others who are just starting off writing and just starting off providing content?
        (i). In your rant, you used the term, "Content of Value" as you know, rating any content boils down to being nothing more than a subjective matter. That said, the next set of questions are related directly to those who possibly would be assigned with grading content. In your mind...
        (1). What should the educational level of the graders be?
        (2). Should the content graders only be accepted if they are from Ivy League schools? Or will graduates from state colleges be acceptable?
        (3). What will be the minimum IQ of those determining if content is of value or not?
        (4). Should content graders be required to posses PhDs? MBAs? And what exactly should their major(s) be?
        (5). Are those without college degrees precluded from determining if content has value or not?
        (6). Are teenagers allowed to provide their perspective of whether the content is of value or not?
        (7). Is a person that only graduated from a technical school less qualified to access the value of content than say a IVY League school graduate?
        (8). Is a person who graduated with a degree in American Studies or English Literature less capable of determining the value of content than say someone who graduated with a degree in Civil Engineering or Chemical Engineering?
        Just a few things to think about before anyone starts dogmatically asserting what they believe is content of value versus poop content.

        Opinions vary...



        Does this answer your question?




        Giles, the Crew Chief
        Giles posts are long and sometimes mysterious, but I love them though and can't help reading them
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      • Profile picture of the author mcmahanusa
        Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

        Linearly dogmatic?

        What the hell is that?

        Linear: Developed sequentially from the obvious without in-depth understanding

        Dogmatic: prone to expressing strongly held beliefs or opinions

        So: Prone to expressing strongly held beliefs or opinions that are developed sequentially from the obvious without in-depth understanding.

        Great expression. Lot of that going on around here.
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  • Profile picture of the author paulie888
    Great post, Matt. This perfectly explains why some people rant and complain that SEO doesn't work. Of course SEO works, and while you can rank your site no. 1 on Google, if the content on there is trash and does not provide any real value to the visitor, your website is never going to convert well. Unfortunately, we see far too many of these types of sites with "optimized" content that does not do a whit in terms of providing value to the visitor, but instead compels them to click away from it faster than a speeding bullet!
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    • Profile picture of the author oneplusone
      Talk about making hasty generalizations.

      Look: I've tested content based sites vs sales pages on Google, and in many markets the sales pages will win by huge margins and make far more money, regardless of how I structure things.

      Often there isn't any need to BS around, you just need to close the deal and make the sale.

      Recently, I was searching for a specific light bulb for my luxury apartment, do you really think I gave a s*** about reading any "valuable content" on light bulbs?

      I just wanted to buy the specific light bulb, and as soon as I found a site selling it, I bought it.

      Ultimately, it depends on understanding your market and the mindset of the people who are searching.

      Providing value isn't an excuse for ignorance and generalizations, you have to test everything and look at the actual numbers.

      Don't get me wrong, I use content based sites myself when appropriate, but many times they are not and selling straight away with no apologies is the way to go.
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      • Profile picture of the author Matt Ausin
        Originally Posted by oneplusone View Post

        Talk about making hasty generalizations.

        Look: I've tested content based sites vs sales pages on Google, and in many markets the sales pages will win by huge margins and make far more money, regardless of how I structure things.

        Often there isn't any need to BS around, you just need to close the deal and make the sale.

        Recently, I was searching for a specific light bulb for my luxury apartment, do you really think I gave a s*** about reading any "valuable content" on light bulbs?

        I just wanted to buy the specific light bulb, and as soon as I found a site selling it, I bought it.

        Ultimately, it depends on understanding your market and the mindset of the people who are searching.

        Providing value isn't an excuse for ignorance and generalizations, you have to test everything and look at the actual numbers.

        Don't get me wrong, I use content based sites myself when appropriate, but many times they are not and selling straight away with no apologies is the way to go.
        Of course anyone remotely sane won't give a s*** about the value of content when looking to buy lightbulbs. That wasn't remotely my point.

        I was talking about pages/blogs that are made to sell lets say a clickbank product about forex, and it can be clearly seen that the owner of the page/blog doesn't know a first thing about, however is posting an article after article on "30 day system to succeed in forex".

        Or, let's leave forex alone. Look at the majority of WSOs.
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        • Profile picture of the author oneplusone
          Originally Posted by MattWrites View Post

          Of course anyone remotely sane won't give a s*** about the value of content when looking to buy lightbulbs. That wasn't remotely my point.

          I was talking about pages/blogs that are made to sell lets say a clickbank product about forex, and it can be clearly seen that the owner of the page/blog doesn't know a first thing about, however is posting an article after article on "30 day system to succeed in forex".

          Or, let's leave forex alone. Look at the majority of WSOs.
          I know where you're coming from, but perhaps your original post isn't as clear as it could be.

          I think what you are trying to talk about is newbies who don't understand their niche, but they will rarely succeed regardless of whether they use content based sites or sales pages.

          I don't think these people should be in these niches in the first place, until they understand what they are talking about.

          There is a disconnect when the prospect feels the seller knows less than them.
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      • Profile picture of the author Crew Chief
        Matt, Matt, Matt...

        Originally Posted by MattWrites View Post

        What the hell were these questions all about? Honestly, I feel flattered that you took the time to type them out, but why? To make a point that the value of content is a subjective matter? Doesn't everyone know that already?
        Apparently, maybe not, read what you wrote...

        Originally Posted by MattWrites View Post

        Ok, so here's a thing - often enough, when searching for something in Google, a lot of the results on the first page are douchey IM pages, who do not provide any value whatsoever to any sane person who is reading them.
        Douchey IM pages???... ...Who do not provide "ANY" value whatsoever to any "SANE" person?

        What exactly are douchey IM pages?

        Matt, those don't seem like the words of someone who understands that the value of content is a subjective matter.

        So my next question is, "How do [You] determine if a person is "SANE"? Or not? Must they have a IQ of 90 to 109 or higher? Or do you use some other barometer?

        If someone purchases a product from a page you classify as a douchey IM page, is that person [In your eyes] a total dimwit void of any sanity?

        Originally Posted by MattWrites View Post

        I was merely saying that people who don't know squat about the stuff they're selling, shouldn't sell it. Period.
        Actually, Matt, that is not how business works. Everyday businessmen and businesswomen sell products and services they know absolutely nothing about. I have a friend on the West Coast who owns a chain of successful grease spoon hamburger joints. But, the thing is, he and his wife are vegetarians and would rather eat horse manure as opposed to eating any red meat.... but they have no problems selling hamburgers.

        Moreover, multitudes of IMers are in markets and niches they themselves know absolutely nothing about. Do you think that one person can provide content for over 130 websites on over 130 totally different subjects ranging from chemotherapy to horseback riding to parts for Mustangs?

        The answer is, "NO!"

        How do they/we do it? We outsource our content to providers who are knowledgeable in the markets and niches we target.

        But I digress...

        To understand why I responded to your thread, you have to peruse the Google Help Forums for: Webmasters, Adsense and GNews sites. There you will see other website owners and IMers reporting and passionately and adamantly clamoring against what they believe to be websites that have a ZERO value of content. Clearly, these individuals feel as though their opinion should be the barometer that determines if a site gets top rankings or gets de-indexed.

        As Adsense Publishers and GNews site owners, myself and my IM Team monitor the Google Forums just to keep our fingers on the pulse of what's going on.

        When I tell you I've seen your rant on the Google forum more times than I can remember, that is an monumental understatement. More times than not the Google forum MODs will take a look at the purported offending site and respond back to the SANE person with, "That's more of a subjective call but you can report the site if you feel a need to..."

        And to answer your question, Robert gets the WF answer of the friggin year!

        Originally Posted by Robert Puddy View Post

        No i wouldnt...

        Give them real content in the product itself, but real content wouldnt sell didly squat

        no point in having a big member (promising content) if you dont get the juices flowing first (Adcopy = fore play)
        Brilliant analogy Robert! Friggin brilliant analogy!

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        • Profile picture of the author deertrail
          No, they just won't buy again.

          -Bryan
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  • Profile picture of the author IM nice guy
    This is a BIG thing to get over for so many people, including me

    Just think, you have to quit being so selfish and concerned with "what you will get" before you actually start getting what you want. Quite a paradox hey?

    Learning to keep pushing out value, without thought of what you are getting back, and doing it in a high leverage way (the internet, software, etc) to affect the most amount of people possible in a positive way, has to be one of THE MOST important skills that anyone can learn, ESPECIALLY for those of us in business.

    I'm still training myself to be honest, but getting there

    Good thread!
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  • Profile picture of the author Robert Puddy
    Originally Posted by MattWrites View Post

    This post is going to be a bit of a rant so feel free to close it and read something else if you don't like rants

    Ok, so here's a thing - often enough, when searching for something in Google, a lot of the results on the first page are douchey IM pages, who do not provide any value whatsoever to any sane person who is reading them.

    Since I happen to sell stuff through internet as well, I can recognize the pattern most people on here follow easily - and see through it. Here's news to people creating those.. most people without IM experience see through that as well.

    They won't buy squat from such page. Instead they will find a page with a real content, while one keyword optimized sites without any real value and fake reviews will get closed right away.

    Kudos to IMers who do actually create content of value, and wouldn't you agree that content with a real value sells better?
    No i wouldnt...

    Give them real content in the product itself, but real content wouldnt sell didly squat

    no point in having a big member (promising content) if you dont get the juices flowing first (Adcopy = fore play)
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    • Profile picture of the author Robert Puddy
      Originally Posted by Crew Chief View Post

      And to answer your question, Robert gets the WF answer of the friggin year!


      Originally Posted by Robert Puddy View Post

      No i wouldnt...

      Give them real content in the product itself, but real content wouldnt sell didly squat

      no point in having a big member (promising content) if you dont get the juices flowing first (Adcopy = fore play)
      Brilliant analogy Robert! Friggin brilliant analogy!

      Giles, the Crew Chief
      I figured that would get someones attention. I even enjoyed typing it

      but most people miss the fact that content only comes into play after the purchase, good content will effect your refund rate and your customer retention rate.

      But it doesnt sell product
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  • Profile picture of the author blogginvixen
    How do you determine content with value? I have a website that focuses on a specific product. I'm now number one for the keyword -- after having knocked my competition out of their spots along with the advertiser whose product I promote.

    That specific page consists of a 227 word review (according to wordcounttol.com), not the 800+ words of filler crap that many courses fool people into believing they need to have in order to review a product. Does it not provide value because it's a short overview of the product?

    If I told you that it makes the most money via Share-A-Sale and Adsense than all my other online properties combined -- is it then valuable?

    Yes there are a lot of crappy pages (or "douchey IM pages" as you put it) sitting at the top of SERPs, but value lies in more than just content. There are too many other factors that come into play. Presentation is the key! Give a little milk...but don't give the entire cow away for free!
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  • Profile picture of the author ryanbiddulph
    Add value, receive value seems to be the way it works.

    The exception would be if you provide a tremendous amount of usable content on your blog or through articles. Massive value can build up trust and when someone trusts you they are usually willing to look past a somewhat silly web page.

    That being said, someone providing massive value probably wouldn't publish value-deprived pages like these.

    RB
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  • Profile picture of the author Murlu
    It's all about leading people into the sales process; just blasting your product out there through hype marketing is such a shallow way to go about things - you should realistically be continuously providing great content so people have a reason to stay around - something other than products - it's just ethical.
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  • Profile picture of the author Vince L
    I love it! Good point, good reminder.

    I have read and have even used (GUILTY) some of the techniques you allude to to get a quick ranking on G, but what you are saying is right - the point is to create solid, valuable, sticky content that helps or answers questions.

    Thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author marcuslim
    I think a better title for the thread would be 'People won't buy AGAIN, if your product doesn't provide value'. The thing is that great flashy marketing does work in persuading someone to buy once, but once they discover the product is crap, they won't get tricked again.
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