Clickbank failed me

by cbrauer 18 replies
I tried Clickbank for a while but had no sales. I have a couple of my products on other sites like Paydot but do not seem to be doing very well. Traffic that I drive myself seems to convert about 20% higher than my affiliates. Traffic I drive myself sells about 4 out of 100 visitors and 17 to 30 opt ins out of 100.

So, this brings some nagging questions to mind. How are my affiliates driving traffic to my site that is not converting.

Are they placing misleading ads?
Are they posting misleading links?
Are they posting in off topic sites?
Are they using the affiliate tools I provide? (banners,emails,articles, and so on)

I am not a marketing expert and will never claim to be. I use a very select couople methods for driving my traffic and it converts well. I have shown my affiliates these ways and most ask questions and repond to my emails. I am working on a private site for my affiliates that will explain how to market my products step by step and increase their profits.

I feel I have let my affiliates down and frustrates me to think of how much money these people could be making. I know it is not my fault if they make no money selling a product that is not mine. When my affiliates are not making money it makes me feel like I have failed them as a vendor.

Any advice or suggestions would be great. If my affiliates were converting like I am they would be making a ton of money online. I am just at a loss.
#main internet marketing discussion forum #clickbank #failed
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  • Profile picture of the author flowers4love
    I can very much understand your frustration – it's not a nice experience to invest money, time and effort and not see any results. Did you do a market research before developing your product? What product are you marketing? Sometimes there's a big market for something and then all of a sudden there is an oversupply.
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    • Profile picture of the author cbrauer
      Originally Posted by flowers4love View Post

      I can very much understand your frustration – it's not a nice experience to invest money, time and effort and not see any results. Did you do a market research before developing your product? What product are you marketing? Sometimes there's a big market for something and then all of a sudden there is an oversupply.
      Thanks for the reply.

      I am not really into markets that everyone is doing, I don't do:

      Make money online
      Health,diet,weight loss, or anything.
      Autoblogging or building content site.
      Adsense,Clickbnk,PPC, or Social sites.

      I am not affiliate or sell products that don't work. I do not claim to make $10,000 a month online or promise others they can do so. Products I sell are information on spacific subjects to save people money, how to guides, common sense.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rob Howard
    You will almost always convert better than your affiliates.

    You understand your market the best. You have the data from sales tracking. You know the numbers. You created the product, know it's sales copy, and can use that to align your message to your traffic.

    Your affiliates are at several disadvantages. Most affiliates don't really understand the importance of good copy. Even in writing presell's and articles, most fail to really understand - thus convert - people.

    Preselling is an artform of copy in and of itself. Most will just slap up a review page and drive traffic to it.

    Not many will build email lists (which can have a profound effect on conversions)

    There are some affiliates, known as super affiliates, who really know what they are doing - they will sell well, have consistent traffic for a long time, and make lots of money.


    But they are in the minority. The weight in your cash is the shear amount of affiliates you can get promoting.

    So don't feel bad if a majority of your affiliates convert way less than you. You aren't failing them. It's just the way it is.

    You can help by giving them good training and tools - but even then, you can't force them to do things perfect.

    Don't beat yourself up. As long as they are getting the money they make, and you show that you care, they'll be happy.

    Rob
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      Originally Posted by ccmusicman View Post

      You will almost always convert better than your affiliates.

      You understand your market the best. You have the data from sales tracking. You know the numbers. You created the product, know it's sales copy, and can use that to align your message to your traffic.

      Your affiliates are at several disadvantages. Most affiliates don't really understand the importance of good copy. Even in writing presell's and articles, most fail to really understand - thus convert - people.

      Preselling is an artform of copy in and of itself. Most will just slap up a review page and drive traffic to it.

      Not many will build email lists (which can have a profound effect on conversions)

      There are some affiliates, known as super affiliates, who really know what they are doing - they will sell well, have consistent traffic for a long time, and make lots of money.


      But they are in the minority. The weight in your cash is the shear amount of affiliates you can get promoting.

      So don't feel bad if a majority of your affiliates convert way less than you. You aren't failing them. It's just the way it is.

      You can help by giving them good training and tools - but even then, you can't force them to do things perfect.

      Don't beat yourself up. As long as they are getting the money they make, and you show that you care, they'll be happy.

      Rob

      What HE said...which is why I never rely on affiliates to promote my
      products.
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      • Profile picture of the author halmo
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        What HE said...which is why I never rely on affiliates to promote my
        products.
        Steven, you just said a golden nugget here. In other words, "don't make yourself dependent on other people." A good eye opener.

        Superaffiliates will sell your product if it's good, but you have to get there first to get the attention of superaffiliates.

        This is validated by the fact that 90% of your affiliates will bring 10% of your (affiliate) sales, and 10% of your affiliates will bring 90% of your (affiliate) sales.
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  • Profile picture of the author Black Hat Cat
    Banned
    How did Clickbank fail you?
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Barboza
      I was wondering the same. I can't see Clickbank's fault anywhere

      Originally Posted by Black Hat Cat View Post

      How did Clickbank fail you?
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by cbrauer View Post

    Traffic I drive myself sells about 4 out of 100 visitors and 17 to 30 opt ins out of 100.
    Do you have an opt-in on the same sales-page to which your affiliates are sending their traffic?

    If you do, then the overall proportion of your affiliates' traffic converted will, I'd imagine, necessarily be much lower than is the case with your own traffic, by definition, i.e. simply because you're dealing exclusively with affiliates who are willing to promote a product with a vendor's opt-in on the sales page.

    I don't mean it as a criticism of anyone - this is just factual: very many of the more successful, professional affiliates are not willing to promote such products, obviously leaving their vendors, overall, with a preponderance of less successful, less professional affiliates. I think it would be naive not at least to wonder whether this is what's happened here.

    A long, leisurely read through this thread may possibly give you food for thought?

    Of course, I have no idea what your product is, but even from my own fairly narrow field of clients there are certainly some who improved matters a lot, on the affiliate sales front, by having available a version of the sales page without the opt-in, simply because doing so enabled them to attract an altogether different sort of affiliate who wouldn't otherwise promote the product. You can still use the one with the opt-in for your own traffic, of course, so it costs nothing to try. Giving the affiliates a choice may attract some more serious ones.

    Respectfully, I think it may be that your expectations of Clickbank weren't altogether realistic, rather than that they "failed you". Don't expect them to find affiliates for you: you need to do that part - especially if you want good ones.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
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      Originally Posted by redicelander View Post

      I've seen Alexa slam this tactic by Clickbank vendors time and time and time again, so I know what she thinks about it, heh heh.
      To be fair, my point wasn't about what I think of it. The argument relates to the factual reality that many other successful, professional affiliates also think the same and select their products to promote accordingly, and you can see a few dozen of them explaining why, here. Heh heh ...
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    • Profile picture of the author cbrauer
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      Respectfully, I think it may be that your expectations of Clickbank weren't altogether realistic, rather than that they "failed you". Don't expect them to find affiliates for you: you need to do that part - especially if you want good ones.
      I have a product on there that has been there for 5 1/2 months with 288 affiliates. The only sale from that site is my original test sale.

      To be honest I had no expectations for Clickbank. I was just trying to help others make some money with well converting products.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rob Howard
    Alexa is right as well.

    I would create (if you don't have one or are doing this) a second sales page without an opt in on the page and see what that does for you.

    Also, don't be afraid to go out and search for affiliates manually. Find people with large sites, lots of traffic, and offer them a deal.

    Rob
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  • Profile picture of the author J Bold
    I don't see too much wrong with an opt-in form on a clickbank vendor's page as long as they are clear that they will send traffic directly back to the sales page so affiliates will still get the sale, taking advantage of the 60-day cookie policy. It's not full-proof but it could actually perhaps increase the likelihood of a sale for the affiliate, in the end. Just may have to wait a bit longer for it.

    I've seen Alexa slam this tactic by Clickbank vendors time and time and time again, so I know what she thinks about it, heh heh. Then again not all affiliates that dislike this would probably take the time to find out if the merchant will be faithful in promising to send affiliates' prospects straight back to the sales page, so you'd have to think about that as well.

    edit: And probably you wouldn't want to trust all vendors to follow up faithfully, from an affiliates' perspective. So I agree that leaving the opt-in means you are probably missing out on affiliates promoting your product, regardless of how faithful you would be in sending traffic back to the sales page so they get sales.
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    • Profile picture of the author Roy Penrod
      Have you considered creating some re-brandable pre-sale reports and an autoresponder series for your affiliates?

      If you give your affiliates some good tools to work with, it might help them increase their sales. Everyone wins.

      Have you seen Paul Hancox's Presell Mastery WSO? It's all about understanding the pre-sale process and creating content to put prospective buyers in a "must buy now" mindset before they hit the sales page.

      Amazing course. I bought it, I study it, I love it. It gave me some really big "light bulb" moments, if you know what I mean.

      Roy
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      • Profile picture of the author cbrauer
        Thank you so much for the advice.

        Most of my products have 3 landing pages:

        Main sales page
        Squeeze page with video and optin
        Squeeze page optin no video

        I don't depend on people to sell my products for me I do just fine. The whole point of getting affiliates was to help others make money. I have some products with a 92% payout.....I just take enough to cover my Paypal and payment cost.

        Also....Time and time again I see Clickbank ads I have on wigets on a few of my blogs that don't go to Clickbank.

        Yesterday on my SEO blog I clicked a link for some website templates in one of Clickbank widgets. I was going to find what site it was and visit the site without my Clickbank ID......Now, I go to the main sales page and check out....Bam no Clickbank stright to Paypal.

        After finding this strange I start clicking all my ads on all my sites and found about 23 sites that do not go to Clickbank for checkout.

        So do alot of people sign up to sell products on Clickbank, get approved, grab a ton of affiliates, and then change the payment gateway to rip off affiliates?
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        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
          Banned
          Originally Posted by cbrauer View Post

          Thank you so much for the advice.

          Most of my products have 3 landing pages:

          Main sales page
          Squeeze page with video and optin
          Squeeze page optin no video
          Apologies if I've missed the point (always possible! ) but I can't tell from what you wrote above whether or not the sales page to which your affiliates are sending their traffic has an opt-in. This is, I would suggest, quite possibly the single key point underlying the answer to the question you originally asked.

          Originally Posted by cbrauer View Post

          So do alot of people sign up to sell products on Clickbank, get approved, grab a ton of affiliates, and then change the payment gateway to rip off affiliates?
          I don't know about "a lot", but some certainly change their sales pages after affiliates have started sending traffic, to offer alternative/additional, non-Clickbank payment methods ... which is one of the reasons why affiliates have to keep checking the sales pages for "leaks". :rolleyes:
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  • Profile picture of the author Rob Howard
    Alexa is right - and the solution is really easy. Create 2 pages. One for you to promote and one for affiliates.

    And if you are worried about building a list or failing to sell these people that get sent, then consider this:

    The strength of having affiliates has nothing to do with gettings sales on the front end (though it is important), the real strength is in the BACKEND.

    If you have tons of affiliates promoting you, and they don't want the opt-in on the sales page, then don't include it.

    I'm more concerned with a buyers list anyway. It is way more valuable than a prospect list and with plenty of upsells and backends, you'll be wise to let the affiliates build your list for you.

    This is why 100% commission is so powerful. Who cares if you don't make a dime on the front in...you are making way more by having quality buyers on your lists and bigger, more expensive products.

    Rob
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