Powerpoint/Camtasia Video Creation Tip

17 replies
This is for creating powerpoint type presentations where there is a lot of
"live" action going on.

For example. You're showing somebody how to find products at the
Clickbank marketplace. So you go there, type in your search parameters,
scroll through the results, and so on.

This can be a time consuming process for two reasons.

1. Load time of the site itself. Sure, you can pause the video in between
searches, but there's an easier way where you don't have to worry about
losing your train of thought or getting out of your groove. After all, waiting
for a site to load can eat into the crispness of your delivery.

2. When you're doing something live time, unless you know your subject
VERY well, you tend to stumble over words and do a lot of um, and ah.
This makes the presentation sound like crap...pardon my French.

So instead of trying to do this live, here is what you do. It may sound like
more work, but it will create a better video.

Here are the steps.

Step 1 - Take a screen print of each web page you're discussing. This
way, load time doesn't come into play. Make sure any typing that needs
to be done is already on the page.

Step 2 - Bring screen print into editor and add any arrows or other graphics
that you feel are needed.

Step 3 - Import each screen print into Powerpoint, creating a new slide
for each one. A simple "insert picture" will overlay the screen print onto
the blank Powerpoint slide.

Step 4 - Write out the script for each slide in a Word Doc and then print
it out.

Step 5 - Go through the Powerpoint presentation adding the narration. You
won't have to stumble over any words because the script is right there
in front of you.

Step 6 - Import into Camtasia and produce in whatever format you want.

By doing this, you don't have to worry about any of those annoying "live"
things that might pop up.

* slow load time
* forgotten passwords
* results you didn't expect
* expired coupons (for demonstrating GoDaddy domain buying)

And so on.

By going through the process beforehand and capturing each screen
as you get to it, you virtually eliminate any problems you might run into.

Try it. You might find that you like this much better than recording live.
#creation #powerpoint or camtasia #tip #video
  • Profile picture of the author Bill Farnham
    Thanks Steven,

    See, if we had a Video Forum this is the kind of post that would really add value.

    And all in one convenient place...

    ~Bill
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    • Profile picture of the author Diver's
      Originally Posted by Bill Farnham View Post

      Thanks Steven,

      See, if we had a Video Forum this is the kind of post that would really add value.

      And all in one convenient place...

      ~Bill
      I was hoping for this section also..

      Shah
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      • Profile picture of the author Marty S
        Steven I do understand what you are trying to say, but I feel there is an even better way to do this while maintaining the action nature of a screencast, rather than just using still images.

        Here is my method:

        1-) Record your screencast ad lib, using any pre-planning you are comfortable with. What you might want to do is just write down major points or steps you need to cover.

        2-) Fire up Camtasia and start your screencast. Follow your major points but NOT worry a bit about verbal stumbling, uhm and uhs at this stage. Save your recording and open up a new project.

        3-) In your project split your audio track and listen to the entire audio while writing it out into a readable script - of course less any stumbles and bumbles. At this stage you can correct any errors and make improvement to the flow of the message.

        4-) Take the new written script, and make an audio recording of this in Audacity sounding as natural as you can. You can even make a headshot video of this using your webcam and Camtasia again.

        5-) Bring your new audio (web-cam) file into the original project and delete the original audio altogether. Now just match up the video (edit using speed, cuts, zooms and arrow/image pngs) to the new audio file.

        You will have a much more engaging video using real actions rather than still images. I hope you get what I mean here. Here is a sample of such a video using this technique:

        LANGUAGE WARNING
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  • Profile picture of the author julesw
    great tip !
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    • Profile picture of the author alwaysready
      Thank you for the tips !
      important topic
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      • Profile picture of the author dwightsmith2009
        Step 6 - Import into Camtasia and produce in whatever format you want.
        If I were you, I will convert the PowerPoint file to HD video directly using a converter. As we all know, Camtasia Studio costs hundreds of dollars.
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        • Profile picture of the author mattsrinc
          You don't need to buy Camtasia Studio if you have PowerPoint 2010. This version (latest) finally gives good video export, even for embedded videos in presentation since PowerPoint 2010 now has proper graphics "engine" (specifically, DirectX 9).

          So, plug you USB mike, start recording (Slide Show, Set Up group, Record Slide Show, Start Recording from Beginning - then in Record Slide Show select Narrations and laser pointer check box) and at the end confirm that you'd like to save transition times etc. Then go to File, Save & Send, click Create a Video. You can choose YouTube HD (1.280 x 720 pixels). And there you have it.

          If you ask me, it's worth buying (PP 2010). Don't forget to use good microphone since audio is 60% of percepted video quality. Like Audio Technica 2020 USB or at least Samson C01U or C03U.
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          • Profile picture of the author dwightsmith2009
            Originally Posted by mattsrinc View Post

            You don't need to buy Camtasia Studio if you have PowerPoint 2010. This version (latest) finally gives good video export, even for embedded videos in presentation since PowerPoint 2010 now has proper graphics "engine" (specifically, DirectX 9).

            So, plug you USB mike, start recording (Slide Show, Set Up group, Record Slide Show, Start Recording from Beginning - then in Record Slide Show select Narrations and laser pointer check box) and at the end confirm that you'd like to save transition times etc. Then go to File, Save & Send, click Create a Video. You can choose YouTube HD (1.280 x 720 pixels). And there you have it.

            If you ask me, it's worth buying (PP 2010). Don't forget to use good microphone since audio is 60% of percepted video quality. Like Audio Technica 2020 USB or at least Samson C01U or C03U.
            PowerPoint 2010 can only output 320x240, 640x480 and 960x720 wmv video.
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  • Profile picture of the author Gary King
    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    This makes the presentation sound like crap...pardon my French.
    Wouldn't that be 'le crap'?

    Thanks for the share Steven. I watched a vid today that was waiting like 10 times for the page to load. Great ideas.
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  • Profile picture of the author smartdoctor
    Great tip Thank you
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  • Profile picture of the author bobsilber
    I just made a dozen product training videos using the pause and edit method. I wish I had this thread last week but I will try both methods in my next project. The pause and edit method wasn't enjoyable for me. Thanks for the tips.
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  • Profile picture of the author donhx
    Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

    This is for creating powerpoint type presentations where there is a lot of "live" action going on.
    So, are you saying that when you do live action videos that you should take the live action out?

    I'd say it is far easier and faster to do a Camtasia live action screen capture, edit, and then lay in a track 2 narration, either script or free-form if you can do that well.

    At the very least you keep the live action in the live action videos, and that does help sustain interest. If I understand you, you are talking about substituting a slide show for a movie, and I don't see how that is an improvement.
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    • Profile picture of the author Marty S
      Originally Posted by donhx View Post

      So, are you saying that when you do live action videos that you should take the live action out?

      I'd say it is far easier and faster to do a Camtasia live action screen capture, edit, and then lay in a track 2 narration, either script or free-form if you can do that well.
      This is what I was describing (above) as well. Still-image videos are almost as lifeless as robot video articles.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      Originally Posted by donhx View Post

      So, are you saying that when you do live action videos that you should take the live action out?

      I'd say it is far easier and faster to do a Camtasia live action screen capture, edit, and then lay in a track 2 narration, either script or free-form if you can do that well.

      At the very least you keep the live action in the live action videos, and that does help sustain interest. If I understand you, you are talking about substituting a slide show for a movie, and I don't see how that is an improvement.
      No, when I say live action (not movies or clips of a speaker, etc.) I am
      talking about showing screen navigation such as navigating a web site
      to say, make a purchase (buy a domain from GoDaddy) where there are
      so many things that can go wrong (slow load time, forgotten passwords,
      etc.)

      If you actually read my post, you would have seen that this was
      specifically what I was referring to.
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      • Profile picture of the author donhx
        Originally Posted by Steven Wagenheim View Post

        No, when I say live action (not movies or clips of a speaker, etc.) I am
        talking about showing screen navigation such as navigating a web site
        to say, make a purchase (buy a domain from GoDaddy) where there are
        so many things that can go wrong (slow load time, forgotten passwords,
        etc.)

        If you actually read my post, you would have seen that this was
        specifically what I was referring to.

        Thanks for the details. It seems I did understand you in the first place, however. I see no net gain in your procedure. You still have to wait to to set up screen shots and all, and when you remove the motion it becomes just another slide show.

        I come from a documentary film making background. I want as much motion as possible. The best way to do that is to shoot live action (on the screen or wherever), then simply edit it to get rid of the stuff that does not move your story along. After the edit, you do the V/O to create a tight, interesting video.

        You seem to want to edit before you shoot and reduce the dynamic value of the video. I'd say that's counterproductive.

        Camtasia is a wonderful on-screen video studio. It is very efficient to capture motion, and worth the effort to learn.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nithiyaah
    Thanks for this wonderful tip Steven and also to you mattsrinc for letting us know that Powerpoint 2010 have its own video producing capability. It's a great news for those who cannot afford to have their own copy of Camtasia. However, in my opinion Camtasia is the best.

    Just a little tip: Guys, some of you might find that your video's audio quality is not clear eventhough you use a good mic. This is most probably because of there is no sound card to support your recording. So, go to any computer shop & ask for the sound card. Then, plug in your mic with it and your audio will be in high quality. This is just my own experience & I'm sharing this with you guys here. Hope this helps someone who really need it..
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  • Profile picture of the author Darren Beecham
    Great tips there

    thanks
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