[Urgent] : About Your ClickBank Account

25 replies
Yes, I know, I know. We went through this before - deceptive email subject lines.

But I just have to ask... where do we draw the line?

Here's the subject line of an email I received today - actually, it came from 2-3 different sources:

[Urgent] Sylvia Dickens : About Your ClickBank Account

Now, if you see [Urgent] in an email that references your CB account, wouldn't you feel a little worried? I know I did. I thought, what the heck. Is there a problem with my CB account? Have I done something wrong? Have I lost money? Has my account been compromised somehow? Is someone trying to hijack my money?

Of course, it was simply a hyped up email that continues:
Hey Sylvia Dickens,

How do you go from the poor guy who
lost his job to the recession and
walked for miles to pick up his
$100 welfare check...

..to making over $1m dollars in 3
months on ClickBank?

The answer is STARING AT YOU
on this page...
And so it goes. The sender is promoting some software that helps you make money from CB.

Now I ask you. What is so [Urgent] about this other than the fact the guy wants to make a sale?

What's wrong with it, you ask? The alarming nature of the email that has no real urgency regarding my CB account. Plus the fact that I'm beginning to 'junk' these without looking and could inadvertently miss a real urgent email regarding my accounts.

"Cry Wolf" ring any bells?

Yes, I know. It's just another 'trick' to get us to open the emails. "The key is in what you put in the subject line", as so many people keep pointing out.

And yes, I feel the same about emails with subject lines that "claim" that "You've made a sale!"

Personally, I'm getting so fed up with this tactic that I'm starting to unsubscribe from lists that I otherwise would not. I don't like being "tricked" or alarmed unless there is a true emergency that I need to deal with quickly.

Surely there are others who feel the same.

Another point to this that I wonder about is the 'false advertising' rule. Claiming I made a sale when I clearly did not is, at least in my view, false advertising, since email has become the new advertising medium.

The marketing world has changed considerably over recent years - telemarketers that leave you hanging while they finish with another call, TMs who call during dinner, TM calls that are recordings only, and now emails with false statements in the subject line.

Is it just me? Or am I just becoming increasingly intolerant in my old age?

Sylvia
#account #clickbank #urgent
  • Profile picture of the author LiquidSeo
    Originally Posted by sylviad View Post

    Yes, I know, I know. We went through this before - deceptive email subject lines.

    But I just have to ask... where do we draw the line?

    Here's the subject line of an email I received today - actually, it came from 2-3 different sources:

    [Urgent] Sylvia Dickens : About Your ClickBank Account

    Now, if you see [Urgent] in an email that references your CB account, wouldn't you feel a little worried? I know I did. I thought, what the heck. Is there a problem with my CB account? Have I done something wrong? Have I lost money? Has my account been compromised somehow? Is someone trying to hijack my money?

    Of course, it was simply a hyped up email that continues:
    Hey Sylvia Dickens,

    How do you go from the poor guy who
    lost his job to the recession and
    walked for miles to pick up his
    $100 welfare check...

    ..to making over $1m dollars in 3
    months on ClickBank?

    The answer is STARING AT YOU
    on this page...
    And so it goes. The sender is promoting some software that helps you make money from CB.

    Now I ask you. What is so [Urgent] about this other than the fact the guy wants to make a sale?

    What's wrong with it, you ask? The alarming nature of the email that has no real urgency regarding my CB account. Plus the fact that I'm beginning to 'junk' these without looking and could inadvertently miss a real urgent email regarding my accounts.

    "Cry Wolf" ring any bells?

    Yes, I know. It's just another 'trick' to get us to open the emails. "The key is in what you put in the subject line", as so many people keep pointing out.

    And yes, I feel the same about emails with subject lines that "claim" that "You've made a sale!"

    Personally, I'm getting so fed up with this tactic that I'm starting to unsubscribe from lists that I otherwise would not. I don't like being "tricked" or alarmed unless there is a true emergency that I need to deal with quickly.

    Surely there are others who feel the same.

    Another point to this that I wonder about is the 'false advertising' rule. Claiming I made a sale when I clearly did not is, at least in my view, false advertising, since email has become the new advertising medium.

    The marketing world has changed considerably over recent years - telemarketers that leave you hanging while they finish with another call, TMs who call during dinner, TM calls that are recordings only, and now emails with false statements in the subject line.

    Is it just me? Or am I just becoming increasingly intolerant in my old age?

    Sylvia

    I couldn't agree with you more Sylvia. I always unsubscribe from lists where the owner repeatedly puts out garbage content or deceptive, hype filled emails.

    Of course...I am turning 40 in a few months!
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    • Profile picture of the author ledine
      Originally Posted by LiquidSeo View Post

      I couldn't agree with you more Sylvia. I always unsubscribe from lists where the owner repeatedly puts out garbage content or deceptive, hype filled emails.

      Of course...I am turning 40 in a few months!
      I agree, some of my email accounts is turning to garbage by these emails and some times there is no way how to stop them sending them
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    • Profile picture of the author KEY
      Is it just me? Or am I just becoming increasingly intolerant in my old age?
      yes! we are all getting intolerant as time passes, AND
      these sort of tactics being put into play are no help!

      odd how these mails are getting out and about ... had
      to go out and get some supplies, before the 'big' blizzard
      hits and used the drive time to think...

      for those of us that do NOT want to do business this way?
      this is a fantastic thing! my thinking is that these idiots
      that are adopting this style of subject line will drive people
      off of their lists and onto the lists of people that do NOT
      have fake urgency or payment received subject lines. LET
      them continue!

      business is still a bit like war. let them cut their supply lines
      and weaken themselves. those of us that actually give a
      damn about the integrity of our lists and do things the 'right'
      way will win the 'war' as a result. :p
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      • Profile picture of the author sylviad
        One big point that screams at me in such emails is... "You Lied To Me!"

        The next thought is: "Can I Trust You?"

        Inevitably, the answer is no. I do not feel I can trust someone who sends such emails, even though some have come from marketers I recognize and who I always thought had integrity.

        Translation: "I'm no longer interested in anything you have to say." Or at the very least, "I'll be skeptical of your emails in future."

        Action: "Add to 'Junk' folder" or if possible "Unsubscribe".

        And even that isn't always an option. Some such emails give you the unsubscribe button which only takes you to a page not available. I know some spammers /phishing emails use this tactic to collect information from you. As soon as you click the unsubscribe, you become a target. So I've resorted to simply 'junking' them.

        Sylvia
        Signature
        :: Got a dog? Visit my blog. Dog Talk Weekly
        :: Writing, Audio Transcription Services? - Award-winning Journalist is taking new projects. Warrior Discounts!
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        • Originally Posted by sylviad View Post

          One big point that screams at me in such emails is... "You Lied To Me!"

          The next thought is: "Can I Trust You?"

          Inevitably, the answer is no. I do not feel I can trust someone who sends such emails, even though some have come from marketers I recognize and who I always thought had integrity.

          Translation: "I'm no longer interested in anything you have to say." Or at the very least, "I'll be skeptical of your emails in future."

          Action: "Add to 'Junk' folder" or if possible "Unsubscribe".

          And even that isn't always an option. Some such emails give you the unsubscribe button which only takes you to a page not available. I know some spammers /phishing emails use this tactic to collect information from you. As soon as you click the unsubscribe, you become a target. So I've resorted to simply 'junking' them.

          Sylvia
          Exactly, I also unsubscribe from crap like that. Sometimes I really wonder why I ever subscribed in the first place and hype filled emails like you quoted are so old that I've become blind to them already. So when I see [Urgent] somewhere in an email, I instantly know it's some marketer that is going to pitch me something.
          Signature
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          >Let Me Build HIGH QUALITY Backlinks For You!<
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  • Profile picture of the author AndrewStark
    This tactic comes and goes, someone at a seminar must have said it made them a killing, and now everyone is copying it in the blind hope it will make them more sales.

    If we all hit the unsubscribe button and report spam button on anyone who uses it then it will soon disappear again.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Originally Posted by sylviad View Post

    Now, if you see [Urgent] in an email that references your CB account, wouldn't you feel a little worried?
    Honestly, not really, because I'd also see right next to that who it comes from, wouldn't I? :confused:

    I'd probably unsubscribe, because I don't like being on the lists of people who do that (can't learn anything from them and wouldn't do business with them anyway), but that's a different matter.

    People do these things because they see other people doing them and imagine that they "must" work. These are marketers with little awareness of their own branding, reputation and image, who just chase quick sales, I think, more or less to the excusion of other considerations more important in the longer term.
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    • Profile picture of the author KEY
      Now, if you see [Urgent] in an email that references your CB account, wouldn't you feel a little worried?
      like Alexa, I would not be concerned...because I do not
      use the same emails for lists as I do for accounts like
      clickbank, paypal, 2CO, etc - and while some systems
      will subscribe me to a list after a payment with my
      paypal email? I generally either do not confirm/unsubscribe
      or I subscribe and then immediately go in and change
      the email address to one of my 3 'list' addresses.

      do this and you will save yourself a lot of time!
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    • Profile picture of the author sylviad
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      Honestly, not really, because I'd also see right next to that who it comes from, wouldn't I? :confused:

      ...
      Not necessarily. In this instance, the name beside the subject line is: "For Your Account". In another email with this same subject line, the name was from "John".

      Many official emails that I've received come from unfamiliar names which always amazes me. If you are legitimately from this company, why sign it with a name I would not recognize? My host account is one that I can think of off top of my head.

      Some spam provides legitimate-sounding 'from' names, too. I've received them from 'PayPal', 'Management', 'Account Manager' and the like.

      In view of this, I don't always put much faith in the 'received' column unless it's obvious who it's from.

      Sylvia
      Signature
      :: Got a dog? Visit my blog. Dog Talk Weekly
      :: Writing, Audio Transcription Services? - Award-winning Journalist is taking new projects. Warrior Discounts!
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  • Profile picture of the author Zeus66
    What a monumentally stupid thing to do if you have marketers on your email list! Reputation? Shot to hell. Unsub rate? Through the roof. Sales from such a lame subject line? Who cares??? Cutting off your nose to spite your face comes to mind.

    I guess if you don't mind tricking people and they're not marketers, you might get away with this silly tactic and make more sales. But you're still a sad sack in my book.

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author scott33
    you ever get those emails with black backgrounds in the subject line? I don't know how some of these guys get through tbh
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  • Profile picture of the author cashcow
    Yeah, I find these types of subject lines to be incredibly annoying and I always unsubscribe from the list.

    BUT, the one I got last week takes the cake. Same type of subject line but when I went to unsubscribe, the unsubscribe link took me to a sale page! I couldn't even unsub!!


    Lee
    Signature
    Gone Fishing
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    • Profile picture of the author pappyy3
      Got the same email today, (Just before reading this post).

      However - I never got to read it. My finger has a mind of it's own lately. It just shot out and pressed the delete button.

      Damn Finger
      Signature

      Tonster

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      • Profile picture of the author kurtoneil
        Email marketing like all areas of IM has become extremely competitive. And as a result "open rates" have fallen off a cliff. Just getting the recipient to open your email is a huge challenge.

        The subject line is the primary focus for increasing open rates for email marketers today. Unfortunately some of us go a little too far and can get overly creative with subject lines. But if you are in this niche and on multiple lists you should expect just about anything these days. The examples you quoted are tame compared to some of the stuff I have received lately.
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  • Profile picture of the author humbledmarket
    Banned
    No it's not just you when I see such email my perception about the person drops immediately. Just saw somethign similar removed myself from their list and deleted their email because I was fustrated.
    "[WARNING] $37 Clickbank Scam "
    Then they went on to explaining how that no #37 product will actually make you profitable(The problem is they are not being accurate by categorizing all products. I personally put a lot of effort into my own products and I know many people will do.) because no one is going to sell their business plan for $37.

    Then the email goes on to selling a business like groupon with coaching. Now that' ironic. The swap is talking about selling a business for $37 then they offer a saturated business propersol. Personally whenever I offer a service or product I feel I have to ensure it's actually a value to them. Offering someone to set up a groupon site in the masses doesn't really set up for much success for the buyers.

    The thing that fustrates me most is they first talk about other products $37 products not being good which don't really work when i know MANY who actually work but truth is they are right to a certain degree but I don't like the way the portray it and categorizing everyone together then promoting their own business.

    If groupon was so successful instead of coaching others why not do it themselves on a larger scale or have some franchaising.
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  • Profile picture of the author ShaneRQR
    Well, there's also a bright side to this: You know who to unsubscribe from and who NOT to watch and take notes from, when it comes to marketing.

    A headline like that is mildly insulting and extremely short-sighted. Whoever sent the e-mail clearly has no clue.
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    • Profile picture of the author sylviad
      Using such subject lines sure does downgrade your opinion of someone. Another common one used by some fairly well-known marketers references a PayPal sale. They so closely match a typical PayPal notification that you feel uplifted and open it. Those are the ones that say, "You've Made A Sale" and includes "Item #..."

      Well, it's not too difficult for me to figure out in most cases because I don't have as many items for sale as they indicated by that Item #.

      But sometimes, I'm not entirely sure and have to look to find out. Only to find that absolutely asinine subject line leads to an opening: "How would you like to get those messages in your inbox every day" or something to that effect. And every time I open and see that, I cringe and send it right to my junk box.

      Yes, it pays to get creative in your subject line, but not to the point of deception. And certainly not to the point that you destroy your own credibility. :rolleyes:

      Sylvia
      Signature
      :: Got a dog? Visit my blog. Dog Talk Weekly
      :: Writing, Audio Transcription Services? - Award-winning Journalist is taking new projects. Warrior Discounts!
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  • Profile picture of the author chiwawa
    The title is wrong and way of promotion is totally annoying. I think they should try something else.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nick Brighton
    I spent a whole day inside my junk folder once. By midnight, I'd made my first million, grown 4 inches, lost and regained my hair, had my Paypal shut down, missed an important FedEx delivery in the UK and invested in a nice fellow from Nigeria who had inheritance issues.

    Then I switched back to my inbox for the comedown.
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    • Profile picture of the author Steven Wagenheim
      The people who use these deceptive, and at times frightening, subject lines
      should be:

      boiled in oil
      flogged within an inch of their lives
      sentenced to life in front of a firing squad
      made to watch Brady Bunch reruns

      and forbidden from ever making a living online as long as they live.

      Their computers should be taken away and they should have to go out and
      find a 9 to 5.

      If people who did this knew that just one simple email to the authorities
      informing them of the infraction would carry out the above punishment,
      we'd put a stop to this nonsense.

      /Rant
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Come on, Steve ... it's not like you to stand on ceremony about an issue like this: tell us what you really think.
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  • Profile picture of the author TomVa
    I got one today and asked to be taken off, this is the response I got,
    "**** OFF YOU WANKER YOU SHOULDNT HAVE SUBSCRIBED TO IT DUMBO

    real nice eh?
    Signature

    Do you need stable WEBHOSTING? https://hpthost.com HEY folks, for a limited time get the first month of service For only $0.01 That's 1 cents. At checkout use coupon code 1cent. This is only for web hosting, and only applies to the monthly services.

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  • Profile picture of the author WillR
    That's the one thing I hate about this forum - we can't slag off the idiots doing this type of thing. IMO they need to be named publicly and called out for the crap marketing tactics they continue to use. Maybe that will make them wake up. In the meantime just keep unsubscribing from these idiots.
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  • Profile picture of the author King Shiloh
    Banned
    I don't know about any other person but whatever raises my adrenalin level has only got on my nerves and I won't take it funny at all.

    Who took my unsubscribe button? Please bring it to me...
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    • Profile picture of the author REHughes
      Used to be you mostly found these tactics in places like traffic exchanges or something of the sort, but it seems this entire last year this has grown to be a common theme with many IM'rs.
      But it seems to be even more compounded when your well known top list marketers are now stooping to these tactics.
      When I first started dabbling online, it seemed there were certain elite marketers that I could always count on to deliver top notch content in their e-mails.
      Seems that has gone by the wayside now.
      I have noticed lately though that it seems some of the "real professionals" still around are beginning to take notice of this also and are slowly distancing themselves from anyone employing these tactics, as well as other deceptions such as we have seen lately with product launches.
      One serious marketer whose name I won't mention has all but called names lately of some of them, and sadly many of them are past students that he admired previously.
      So, what does that tell you?
      Hopefully, though, with eyebrows really being raised on this subject so much in the last couple of months, people will really begin to take notice and break any affiliation with them.
      I have a feeling this year is going to bring some old faces down and some new faces up in the IM arena, and I for one am looking forward to it!

      Robert
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