How best to determine desperate PROVEN buyers

23 replies
Hey guys,
I have a small phrase here that I kept from one of James Schramko's powerpoint slides that reads as follows.....

SNEAKY SUCCESS FORMULA.

provide valuable solutions
to desperate proven buyers
with problems you can solve
in the largest market
you can easily access

I understand this concept clearly, but am a little stuck at the second point, "desperate proven buyers"

How is it possible to accurately determine PROVEN buyers in a particular marketplace? I mean I guess, I could check amazons best sellers, or look at CPC and so forth, but are there any other ways that I could use to better verify this?

Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.

John
#buyers #desperate #determine #proven
  • Profile picture of the author packerfan
    One way would be to have a buyers list. Offer a cheap report, ebook, video series, etc. Even it's only a buck, they've proven they'll spend money, and aren't just info seekers.

    That's one way...
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  • Profile picture of the author Wayne-JJ
    I think there isn't much different between the needs of online and offline customers.

    Often we find ourself searching online for certain information on how to solve a problem if we can't find any solution to our problems in the offline world.

    Come to think of it, the online world is just like the offline world, except bigger.

    What sells in the offline world will sell online
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  • Profile picture of the author officer_iron
    As PackerFan said, there's a difference between having a list of buyers and a list of freebie addicts. If you charge something for your product, you will have buyers. You may not have as many downloads, but your list will be worth MUCH more, even if it is much smaller.
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  • In my experience, internet marketing is all about getting your product in front of the right people. It really doesn't matter what you are selling. If you can do this you will be targeting 'desperate proven buyers'.
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  • Profile picture of the author petevamp
    Desperate buyers are simply those who have a problem and want to have it solved. These buyers will simply purchase anything. A great example of desperate proven buyers is the making money niche. The people looking at these products are either looking for a solution to solve there financial woes or they simply want to start making more money so they can enjoy the life of freedom just a little more.

    Another good example of proven desperate buyers are those who want to lose weight. People will buy anything to lose weight. Heck look at that one diet that came out a couple of years ago. The COOKIE Diet that is one big joke however the guy that created that diet made a fortune.

    All I do to see how likely a niche will be with buyers is simply look at the cpc in googles adwords tools. You need to think about it this way that bid price would not be that high if people where not paying to advertise for that keyword. You can dig even deeper on that by using a site like keywordspy. There it would tell you how many advertisers are bidding on that keyword.

    Now I do not know what your niche is or what your product is. However if you simply stay with the market that the cpc is above $2.50 you can be assured there are quite a few buyers in that market. Anything under $1 I would normally stay clear of but not if it is a brand new market. Typically the higher the number the better. Just have a look at some of the markets you already know are hot and established. The cpc on those keywords like real estate, debt relief and weight loss all have cpc in the double digits. There for you know the market has alot of very proven buyers.

    Then to find the proven part just start looking through the how to keywords. Many of these are going pretty high and you should beable to find a bunch of markets in a single sitting of desperate shoppers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nikhil V Nair
    Originally Posted by ramone_johnny View Post


    I understand this concept clearly, but am a little stuck at the second point, "desperate proven buyers"

    How is it possible to accurately determine PROVEN buyers in a particular marketplace?
    The best way is to put yourself into your customer's shoes.

    You Are Your Prospect

    How much severe is the problem you are facing?
    How much money are you ready to spend?
    How fast do you want a solution?
    Are you ready to buy the solution online?
    How many times do you think of this problem every day?


    Analyze your answers to these questions and you can easily find whether it is a market with "desperate proven buyers"

    Eg:

    Consider the following three markets

    1) People who like to learn Spanish as a hobby
    2) People who want to buy a new chair
    3) People whose home is about to be foreclosed

    Put yourself into these situations and answer the above questions.

    You can easily determine that the third one (People whose home is about to be foreclosed) is desperate market.

    If you have good solution to sell them, it will bring more fortune than the other markets.

    I am a huge fan of desperate marketing

    Hope it helps

    Nikhil
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  • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
    Thanks Nikhil,
    This definitely helps.

    For anyone thats interested, this video was recommended to me here a few weeks ago. I keep watching it - and it is definitely helping.

    GURU BluePrint Blog » Blog Archive » How To Identify And Target Highly Profitable Information Niches Online
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  • Profile picture of the author Syamsul Alam
    Hm... I think it is by examining what people buy online, every day.

    How to get that information?

    By these tools:

    Google AdWords: Keyword Tool
    Search Marketplace - ClickBank
    Trellian Competitive Intelligence
    KeyCompete
    Google Trends
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  • Profile picture of the author moneymakerz
    I think the answer also lies in targeting people who are in the correct frame of mind for buying.
    The person who is casually searching for buying mobile phone will type in "buy mobile phone" as search query
    Then he will put up the query as "nokia phones" once he has decided to buy nokia phones
    The final buying phrase will be "nokia 6110". This is when the person has decided to buy your product
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  • Profile picture of the author J.M.Wilson
    It's extremely easy to find markets full of desperate buyers. Here are just a few things you can do to find out if a market you are interested in has rabid buyers;

    Adwords Ads - usually if there are a lot of ads around your niche/keywords, you will find a market where people are spending substantial amounts of money. The more ads that stay around for long periods of time the better. On the whole, people don't advertise for nothing.

    Forums - visit your niche forums and find out the scoop. It's easy to use the WF as an example here. Look at the WSO and how many are viewing... how many replies to the threads... how many transaction ID's are posted...

    Look also at the Product Reviews section for more actualy proof people are buying.

    Visit forums and investigate if people are talking about buying certain things and how much of it they are buying.

    Those are two ideas you can use to gauge how profitable your venture may or may not be. Hope they helped you.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      I've always found AdWords quite a good guide, John: not only the cost-per-click but also an inspection of (a) "how quickly you see the same ones coming round" when you click through the pages of the Google SERP's for the relevant keywords: if you get the same ones on each page, each means that not so many people are paying for them, which might not be a great sign; and (b) whether you see the same ones running regularly over a couple of weeks or more, which indicates that they're not just "testing" but are making something out of it, i.e. it's a niche in which people spend money.

      Not "proof", but evidence.

      Little digression: I think there's another category of "desperate buyers", too, comprising reasonably affluent "enthusiasts". These are people looking for a solution to a problem, but it's a "problem" caused by their obsession with a subject and their willingness to spend money on "feeding their obsession" and reading/seeing something new about it. I suspect many people dismiss these niches on the grounds of their comparatively small size, but in some of them the proportion of "information-desperate buyers" (for our purposes) can actually be high enough to compensate for that, and make them pretty easy pickings.
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      • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        I've always found AdWords quite a good guide, John: not only the cost-per-click but also an inspection of (a) "how quickly you see the same ones coming round" when you click through the pages of the Google SERP's for the relevant keywords: if you get the same ones on each page, each means that not so many people are paying for them, which might not be a great sign; and (b) whether you see the same ones running regularly over a couple of weeks or more, which indicates that they're not just "testing" but are making something out of it, i.e. it's a niche in which people spend money.

        Not "proof", but evidence.

        Little digression: I think there's another category of "desperate buyers", too, comprising reasonably affluent "enthusiasts". These are people looking for a solution to a problem, but it's a "problem" caused by their obsession with a subject and their willingness to spend money on "feeding their obsession" and reading/seeing something new about it. I suspect many people dismiss these niches on the grounds of their comparatively small size, but in some of them the proportion of "information-desperate buyers" (for our purposes) can actually be high enough to compensate for that, and make them pretty easy pickings.

        Thanks Alexa...a few questions if you dont mind

        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        when you click through the pages of the Google SERP's for the relevant keywords: if you get the same ones on each page, each means that not so many people are paying for them, which might not be a great sign;
        Im not sure what you mean by this? Are you saying that not all keywords, although closely related arent profitable? Is that what you mean?

        Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

        (b) whether you see the same ones running regularly over a couple of weeks or more, which indicates that they're not just "testing" but are making something out of it, i.e. it's a niche in which people spend money.
        Interesting. This leads me to believe you may study a marketplace, or keyphrase for a few weeks at a time before moving in. Am I correct? Could you please tel me.......how much time do you spend evaluating a particular niche/market before deciding its a viable decision and will most likely be profitable? A few hours? Days? Weeks???

        In the past, Ive made a habit of doing keyword research, picking a niche, registering a domain name and started product development, all in one day. Some work, others dont. Id like to get this success/failure ratio more to a 80/20. At the moment its more 20/80

        Out of interest, I gave myself a report card score last night...

        keyword research 9/10
        website development 10/10
        seo 10/10
        backlinking 9/10
        niche selection 3/10
        product development 7/10 (outsourced)

        There are no doubt a few other areas I havent covered above, but I know for certain that niche selection is my weakness. Definitely an area I need/want to improve upon.

        Looking forward to your response.
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        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
          Banned
          Originally Posted by ramone_johnny View Post

          Im not sure what you mean by this? Are you saying that not all keywords, although closely related arent profitable? Is that what you mean?
          Partly this, yes ... I believe that within niches, there can still be "buying" and "non-buying" keywords. And that the sites where you can (allegedly) "check the level of buying intention" for given keywords are completely unreliable. So seeing whether any advertisers are continuing to spend promotional money for a keyword may be a much more valuable clue. But still only evidential, rather than probative, of course.

          Sometimes there can be keywords with comparatively high search frequency and low competition and a good reason for that: nobody's making any money out of them.

          Originally Posted by ramone_johnny View Post

          This leads me to believe you may study a marketplace, or keyphrase for a few weeks at a time before moving in. Am I correct?
          Only because I'm slow moving.

          I never target anything particularly "current/hot" as some people do, so the "urgency" factor doesn't really arise, for me. I recognise that it does, and perfectly validly, for some, though. But I'll typically be thinking about a niche - on and off - for weeks before putting up a site and trying something.

          "Taking fast action" isn't my style of marketing at all.

          Originally Posted by ramone_johnny View Post

          Some work, others dont. Id like to get this success/failure ratio more to a 80/20. At the moment its more 20/80
          I think there's often some element of this involved in it. (Which is partly why I'm always pretty dismissive, for myself, about the AdSense models one sees discussed here in which the projected income figures referred to so often rest on "rinsing and repeating twenty times": it seems to me that one might need to test 100 different sites in order to find the twenty for which the rinsing and repeating is actually successful).

          Originally Posted by ramone_johnny View Post

          I know for certain that niche selection is my weakness. Definitely an area I need/want to improve upon.
          I think people gradually develop their own methods of "niche selection"? To be honest, I sometimes do the whole thing "back-to-front" according to the advice generally offered here on this subject. I sometimes start from a potential product I've seen while searching Clickbank's marketplace, if I like the sales page enough (and then at least the "product-selection" issue's sometimes resolved before I start) and work "outwards" from there, rather than starting by identifying a niche and seeing whether I can find an appropriate product or two. Not everyone's cup of tea, though.

          I do think (regarding affiliate promotion of Clickbank products) that many people do enormous amounts of work/research on a niche, bring a whole range of impressive marketing skills to bear on it and then promote the wrong product, and the longer I do this for, the more important I think product-selection is. It seems to me that if one gets that wrong, it just doesn't matter how good one is at anything/everything else.

          It's simply my own personal perspective and bias, of course, but it makes me shudder a bit when I see in posts here that people apparently obsess about all sorts of technical details for which I'd have to go to night school just to understand the vocabulary, and then expect to select a Clickbank product to promote in about 15 minutes. If I tried to do that, I'd end up with enormous traffic but promoting products that couldn't convert it. Sorry - digressing completely, now ... :p
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          • Profile picture of the author Lee Wilson
            I personally think people take the term "desperate buyers" too literally. I'd much prefer to target an obsessive buyer like an enthusiast. You could call them desperate because they are constantly seeking information to feed their interests long term and you can sell them pretty much the same thing over and over.

            Niche selection is easy, product selection is harder. Anyone who tells you there are methods to get this right first time IMO is either a liar or they have some amazing insight that most everyone else doesn't have, so it's worthless. If it was that easy then companies wouldn't be spending millions refining their ad campaigns, packaging, sales literature etc.

            Everything between the potential buyer's initial query to the purchase of a product matters. So much so, that putting all the emphasis on just one stage of the process is madness. Change any one of the steps in between (including the product itself) and you can alter the conversion massively, or maybe just a little. Trial and error, split testing and analysing is the only way to refine things. Everything else is either luck or it's good enough so I'll leave it.

            Two people could feasibly sell the same product with hugely different results using similar looking sales pages, similar follow ups, similar keywords and similar everything. "Similar" can be miles apart from the "same". Everything matters, not just a bit, but a lot. It's the very reason IMO why newbies struggle so badly, they are convinced they are doing everything right because on the surface it all seems the same.

            You can change one single word in an Adwords ad and change your conversion rate by a few percent. Change two words or a whole line, another 2 or 3+%. Change the headline on the landing page, another 10% and so on. What "appears" to look the same to the average person can be the difference between making $1000 a day vs $100 a year.

            If you have what you think is a good product then you can work to make conversions better. Obviously your pre-selling or sales page can make a huge difference but it also has to match the product itself, not just the outline of the subject matter. Great pre-selling copy for one particular product might not necessarily be great pre-selling copy for a different product selling essentially the same thing with a different sales page.

            IMO there is more money and less effort in refining these stages of the selling than there is with rinse and repeat. That of course won't be the same for everyone but realising just how important it all is will make you better at whatever you do, even if you use the rinse and repeat model. Each time you take notice of it, you learn something and get better at it.

            Regarding keywords, just to expand a bit on what Alexa said about watching PPC ads ... A lot of PPC marketers don't know what they are doing with Adwords. If you are going to use this method then learn to follow the ones that know what they are doing.

            Follow the ones that not only keep appearing for similar searches but find the ones who are properly split testing, (keep hitting refresh) both their ads and their landing pages. The ad should be optimised for the landing page so if you see one that throws up a wide variation of ads all going to the same page then take it as a probability they don't know what they are doing. (You can check all this without clicking on their ads by the way, something which I'm not advocating).

            Of course that isn't a guarantee because they might have only just got started on a campaign and still gathering data to work with, or perhaps something is working so well that they leave it alone to free up time to monitor their other campaigns. Follow someone like this for a while and when you see their split testing either stop or the split ads start becoming very similar, i.e., changes in just a word, puncuation, word placement, plural vs singular etc, then you know you're close to some good buying keywords.

            You could of course find those keywords, use them yourself and still blow it with the pre-selling or a wrong headline and be none the wiser but you could pretty much rest assured at this point that the keywords might not be your problem.

            This all takes some time so probably not a good idea for niche selection but a good thing to monitor the competition for the niches you are in already.

            What I'm trying to get at is I think you need to be careful of putting too much emphasis on one suggestion that doesn't mean anything on it's own. I could easily go and find proven desperate buyers but screw the whole thing up with some of the things I've said above. IMO a better understanding of the whole process is far far more important than a "success formula" like the one mentioned in your opening post doesn't tell you anything or help in any way.

            Just my two opinionated cents!
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            • Profile picture of the author James Schramko
              My mention of desperate referred to the needy buyer.

              definition: having a very great desire, need, etc.
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              • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
                Originally Posted by James Schramko View Post

                My mention of desperate referred to the needy buyer.

                definition: having a very great desire, need, etc.
                Thank you for pitching in James, I really appreciate it.

                Is there any way to better confirm the "needy buyer" apart from just an educated guess?

                Are there any tools or resources that you could recommend?

                Thanks again.
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            • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              Little digression: I think there's another category of "desperate buyers", too, comprising reasonably affluent "enthusiasts". These are people looking for a solution to a problem, but it's a "problem" caused by their obsession with a subject and their willingness to spend money on "feeding their obsession" and reading/seeing something new about it. I suspect many people dismiss these niches on the grounds of their comparatively small size, but in some of them the proportion of "information-desperate buyers" (for our purposes) can actually be high enough to compensate for that, and make them pretty easy pickings.
              Absolutely. I much prefer to target "obsessive buyers" over "desperate buyers."

              For a start, many of the so-called "desperate buyer" niches center around a specific problem or situation. Once the problem is solved or the situation goes away, the desperation does, too.

              If you look, you'll find multiple threads where people ask, "I sold my [niche] product and got them on a list, now what?" And the advice is always what it has to be - pitch them with related products, trying to find something else that might work.

              Give me a good list of hobbyists with OCD anytime...

              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              I think people gradually develop their own methods of "niche selection"? To be honest, I sometimes do the whole thing "back-to-front" according to the advice generally offered here on this subject. I sometimes start from a potential product I've seen while searching Clickbank's marketplace, if I like the sales page enough (and then at least the "product-selection" issue's sometimes resolved before I start) and work "outwards" from there, rather than starting by identifying a niche and seeing whether I can find an appropriate product or two. Not everyone's cup of tea, though.
              This back-end-to process can be even more valuable for product developers than for affiliates, although it can work really well for affiliates, too.

              You simply take the Natural Buying Process and work backwards.

              1. Your prospects first realize that they have a problem they want solved, or a desire they want filled.
              2. Your prospects seek to educate themselves and look for the options available.
              3. With an array of options, your prospects try to narrow down their choices to the ones they believe will best solve the problem or fill the desire.
              4. They decide on a course of action.
              5. They actually pull the trigger and act on their decision.
              Start with #5, the product itself and work backwards to #1, "who might have a want or desire this product would serve, and what is that want and/or desire?"

              It's more work that picking a so-called "buyer keyword" and slapping up a micro-site, but as you work your way from #5 to #1, the potential buyer pool gets immensely bigger.
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              • Profile picture of the author John Romaine
                Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

                Absolutely. I much prefer to target "obsessive buyers" over "desperate buyers."

                For a start, many of the so-called "desperate buyer" niches center around a specific problem or situation. Once the problem is solved or the situation goes away, the desperation does, too.

                If you look, you'll find multiple threads where people ask, "I sold my [niche] product and got them on a list, now what?" And the advice is always what it has to be - pitch them with related products, trying to find something else that might work.
                A while ago, I probably would've responded with "a buyer is a buyer, who cares..."

                But I totally get your point John, and it certainly adds a new perspective. Thanks for sharing.
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              • Profile picture of the author Eno
                Now i know the true difference between the obsessive buyer and the desperate one. Thanks guys.
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                • Profile picture of the author James Schramko
                  search terms like "get rid of" "how to" ,"coupon", "review", "bonus" , "discount" , specific model numbers will help you get closer to a buyer.

                  Proven may just mean that people are already selling these things
                  It may also mean the prospect has already bought something from you.

                  Needy buyers are consumers.

                  I like recurring services because consumers continue to consume
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  • Profile picture of the author Ehsan_am
    I think there is another side to desperate buyer markets. You need to make sure people in a given "desperate buyer market" have enough money to spend on your product.

    For instance people in the "make money online" or "forclosure"" niche are mostly broke and are going to think twice before buying from you.

    However people in "infertility" niche are not only very desperate, but chances are they have more than enough money to spend on info products because they actually try to conceive a child which means that they pobably have a healthy financial situation.
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  • Profile picture of the author PLR Basket
    You can tell how desperate someone is by what they're searching for.

    Per instance, anybody looking for a review is definitely on the brink of making a purchase.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mehak
    great post, it makes sense thanks for sharing. It's best to provide value as people will portray you as a leader.
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