Is Blogging Going Away?

49 replies
According to the NY Times: "Blogging is becoming less popular with young people, according to a Pew Research Center study, with the number of bloggers ages 12 to 17 declining by 50% between 2006 and 2009. That has left some mulling the future of the medium."

"Some say blogs are too time-consuming to maintain and attract too few viewers, while others say bloggers are simply wrapping other social forms into their online activities. "At this point, anyone who is taking blogging seriously -- they're using several mediums to get a large amount of their traffic," says Toni Schneider, CEO of the company behind the WordPress blogging platform"

What do you think of this statement and what if any impact will these findings have on blogging?
#blogging
  • Profile picture of the author Mike McAleer
    Yes, Blogging is no longer viable IMO. Lots of kids these days are satisfied posting on twitter or facebook to get lots of followers/friends
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by FreshDomains View Post

      Yes, Blogging is no longer viable IMO.
      I'm having one of those days when I almost can't believe some of what I'm reading in the forum and am looking in vain for the ironic/sarcastic smilies apparently omitted from people's posts.

      I entirely take the point about the huge increase in social networking replacing some potential blogging, but that's largely potential blogging, not actual blogging. The "raw number" of people blogging may be increasing less quickly, in percentage terms, than it was a couple of years ago, but it's still increasing, not reducing ... we're a very, very long way indeed from blogging being "no longer viable"!
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  • Profile picture of the author Emilis Strimaitis
    Blogging is not so popular, but that doesn't mean it's not powerful To be honest, I even think it's better if fewer people will blog, because that means much lower competition ranking in google overall.

    Facebook and twitter tweets are not a competition at all looking from search engine perspective, in my opinion.
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    • Profile picture of the author coolgeee
      Originally Posted by Emilis Strimaitis View Post

      Blogging is not so popular, but that doesn't mean it's not powerful To be honest, I even think it's better if fewer people will blog, because that means much lower competition ranking in google overall.

      Facebook and twitter tweets are not a competition at all looking from search engine perspective, in my opinion.
      I agree, Blogging is definitely powerful, and wordpress is awesome for getting your sites and your clients sites more traffic and higher search engine rankings.

      Blogging and blog platforms will be around for awhile!
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    • Profile picture of the author etefetuk
      Originally Posted by Emilis Strimaitis View Post

      Blogging is not so popular, but that doesn't mean it's not powerful To be honest, I even think it's better if fewer people will blog, because that means much lower competition ranking in google overall.

      Facebook and twitter tweets are not a competition at all looking from search engine perspective, in my opinion.
      I don't think blogging is going away. It is becoming even more effective in this day and age, especially on social media sites like twitter and facebook. I'm a big proponent of 'don't believe everything you read'.

      Etieno Etuk
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    • Profile picture of the author Alex Barboza
      Originally Posted by Emilis Strimaitis View Post

      Blogging is not so popular, but that doesn't mean it's not powerful To be honest, I even think it's better if fewer people will blog, because that means much lower competition ranking in google overall.

      Facebook and twitter tweets are not a competition at all looking from search engine perspective, in my opinion.
      This is pretty much what I think. This trends can be cyclical, who knows. Blogging can become very hot again
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  • Profile picture of the author HorseStall
    I don't think bogging is going away, but I do think many people read blogs but don't even realize that they are reading blogs. The line between blogs and regular web content is blurring.
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    • Profile picture of the author jonobl
      Originally Posted by HorseStall View Post

      I don't think bogging is going away, but I do think many people read blogs but don't even realize that they are reading blogs. The line between blogs and regular web content is blurring.
      How would you define a blog? How are they different?
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      • Profile picture of the author LarryHaywood
        Originally Posted by jonobl View Post

        How would you define a blog? How are they different?
        Google's response
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  • Profile picture of the author MrDay
    I think more and more people are figuring out that blogging isn't easy and takes quite a bit of effort and skill. Plus you have to consider there is much more competition these days. As a result of this, I could see how blogging is becoming less popular.
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  • Profile picture of the author LarryHaywood
    I agree with MrDay. Less popular maybe but I don't anticipate blogging going away anytime soon. I think since Wordpress is one of the more popular ways to start a website these days that should also help its longevity IMHO.
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    • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
      The article also mentions that some of those people that don't consider themselves bloggers actually have blogs on Tumblr. So, the apparent decline may be, as the article points out, in part a matter of semantics.

      I think the major decline may be in the number of non-serious bloggers. For them, something like Facebook is fine, because they probably only wanted their friends and family reading their "blog" anyway.
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      • Profile picture of the author BeechHill
        I believe blogging is becoming pretty much a thing of the past. As the next generation grows up and stays with the sound bites of info based on Twitter and FaceBook the importance of blogs will fade even more. A lot of it has to do, I feel, with information overload and the 99% of worthless blogs that exist out there, many abandoned for months or years.

        The progression went from forums, which were made to discuss a particular topic among a diverse group of posters, to blogs which catered to followers that held the same principles and ideas, to now social medial networks that only allow close friends with the same interests. In a way the Internet is becoming more insular then expansive.

        WordPress has pretty much evolved from strictly a blog into a flexible developer platform for products and services that can be changed and updated easily. Which is probably the main reason it still remains so popular.
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  • Profile picture of the author Johnny12345
    I don't think blogging is going away. It just became so popular that a large number of "garbage" blogs appeared. What may be happening now is just a natural shakeout.

    John
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  • Profile picture of the author Elion Makkink
    Originally Posted by Barbara Gathany View Post

    According to the NY Times: "Blogging is becoming less popular with young people, according to a Pew Research Center study, with the number of bloggers ages 12 to 17 declining by 50% between 2006 and 2009. That has left some mulling the future of the medium."

    "Some say blogs are too time-consuming to maintain and attract too few viewers, while others say bloggers are simply wrapping other social forms into their online activities. "At this point, anyone who is taking blogging seriously -- they're using several mediums to get a large amount of their traffic," says Toni Schneider, CEO of the company behind the WordPress blogging platform"

    What do you think of this statement and what if any impact will these findings have on blogging?
    I agree they are time consuming but they are definitely not dissappearing! They are still very profitable and not replacable by twitter or facebook. If you really engage with your readers on your blog then you'll have a very nice amount of traffic and you're able to make some serious money.

    However, due to social media I understand the decline.
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  • Profile picture of the author x3xsolxdierx3x
    You get out of a blog what you put into. I do think that the decline in 12 to 17 year old bloggers MAY have something to do with impatience....oftentimes, blogs require alot of work, and alot of time invested, before they bare any fruit.

    Many are just about making money, too. When that doesn't occur within the first week or two, people just simply give up. People have lost the fundamental concept behind blogs--to engage and form relationships with people. Because relationships require work and upkeep, I think that that age group in particular may become turned off by them quickly.

    Originally Posted by Barbara Gathany View Post

    According to the NY Times: "Blogging is becoming less popular with young people, according to a Pew Research Center study, with the number of bloggers ages 12 to 17 declining by 50% between 2006 and 2009. That has left some mulling the future of the medium."

    "Some say blogs are too time-consuming to maintain and attract too few viewers, while others say bloggers are simply wrapping other social forms into their online activities. "At this point, anyone who is taking blogging seriously -- they're using several mediums to get a large amount of their traffic," says Toni Schneider, CEO of the company behind the WordPress blogging platform"

    What do you think of this statement and what if any impact will these findings have on blogging?
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  • Profile picture of the author YseUp
    The internet is all about content. It used to be news groups, then HTML websites, then blogs, then social networks and video sites. Those are all just vehicles to deliver the content.

    Create content in a way that makes it easy for people to access it and you're good to go.

    It doesn't matter much in what kind of vehicle the content is delivered as long as you get it out there.
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  • Profile picture of the author mikemac1
    This NYTimes story obviously has touched a nerve online, thought Matt Mullenweg (the creator of Wordpress), had a interesting post in response...

    The New York Times has a pretty prominent article today called Blogs Wane as the Young Drift to Sites Like Twitter. The title was probably written by an editor, not the author, because as soon as the article gets past the two token teenagers who tumble and Facebook instead of blogging, the stats show all the major blogging services growing — even Blogger whose global “unique visitors rose 9 percent, to 323 million,” meaning it grew about 6 Foursquares last year alone. (In the same timeframe WordPress.com grew about 80 million uniques according to Quantcast.)

    Blogging has legs — it’s been growing now for more than a decade, but it’s not a “new thing” anymore. Underneath the data in the article there’s an interesting super-trend that the Times misses: people of all ages are becoming more and more comfortable publishing online. If you’re reading this blog you probably know the thrill of posting and getting feedback is addictive, and once you have a taste of that it’s hard to go back. You rode a bike before you drove a car, and both opened up your horizons in a way you hadn’t imagined before. That’s why blogging just won’t quit no matter how many times it’s declared dead.

    Blogging (with WordPress) is the natural evolution of the lighter publishing methods — at some point you’ll have more to say than fits in 140 characters, is too important to put in Facebook’s generic chrome, or you’ve matured to the point you want more flexibility and control around your words and ideas. (As The Daily What did in their recent switch from Tumblr to WordPress.) You don’t stop using the lighter method, you just complement it — different mediums afford different messages.
    btw, here's the link to his post: http://ma.tt/2011/02/blogging-drift/
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  • Profile picture of the author BeechHill
    The concept of providing just great content is a little over hyped, no offense. Even a great book, gets boring if the story goes on for too long. While search engines like unique content most people today have little time for much of it.

    It's really about creating value and in sales that usually comes in the form of providing a terrific product. Give me something I really need and present it in a way that I can quickly grasp the value and you’ve caught my attention.
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  • Profile picture of the author openconnect
    People might like to use twitter and facebook but that's because they are communicating with each other and sharing. Blogging has really just turned into online news and editorials. Blogs these days are more like websites that hold content. They are like online interactive magazines. You cannot compare a social network like Facebook and a blog. As long as people are covering stories, they will be blogging.
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  • Profile picture of the author BloggingPro
    I'm not sure how youths blogging becoming unpopular is going to effect blogging for business.

    A blog is an excellent way to get your point across to a large readership. Blogs have become a huge floodgate for news to flow freely and quickly. Because of that reason alone I don't see blogs going anywhere.

    The younger generation may prefer 160 characters or less now, but as they get older they will surely have more to say and move onto another medium.
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  • Profile picture of the author TravisVOX
    I think you could make a legitimate argument that using other forms of message distribution other than blogging is more effective when you consider resource usage versus return.

    I think you could also make a legitimate argument that Twitter is overrated, and will eventually die-off, or not be mentioned as the Godsend in media stories day in and day out.

    I also think people still perceive blogs to be diaries published on-line, and not useful and/or entertaining content.

    There's also only so much content you can provide in 140 characters, or in a restricted space like Facebook.

    But ultimately, doesn't it come down to what people want? People meaning your audience, or customers. I find it hard to believe people (whether now, or in 10 years) people can have all their problems and desires solved via Twitter and Facebook.
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  • Profile picture of the author DontWorryBeHappy
    Blogging isn't going to go away anytime soon and as said the less competition the better all around. I also agree that the lines are becoming very blurred as no doubt all of us here in this forum are aware
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  • Profile picture of the author Dave Rodman
    Banned
    A young person is more likely to use Twitter/Facebook than to start a blog. Isn't that kinda obvious? It doesn't mean blogging is dead.
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    • Profile picture of the author BeechHill
      When USA Today first came out the main street papers quickly denounced the news source as "news bites for the younger generation" that would never hold up against traditional in-depth stories in the long run.

      Now, many of those old line news paper publishers are gone along with their papers. USA Today still remains, but is under pressure like all other print from electronic media.

      The point being that holding onto a form of sales distribution just because your comfortable with it doesn't mean that people's tastes and needs won't change on you, regardless of your personal opinion.

      Like rock stars, one day you're playing to a crowd of 50,000 people in a stadium, the next to 50 in a smoky lounge at an Indian casino in up state New York. If you can't deliver a hit the next generation likes in the form they like, then expect poor results.
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  • Profile picture of the author trytolearnmore
    Well, blogging is kinda dead. People do not bother to share any thoughts with each other, because it is like talking to a brick wall. Facebook and Twitter have killed blogging and maybe the last chance for teens to improve their grammar.

    I mean, what's the point of using the language when you limit yourself to 150 characters or a dumb picture?
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  • Profile picture of the author grannywriteswell
    I think niche blogging is becoming more popular than ever and while it is hard work, and there is a lot of garbage out there with copy and paste text etc, the decent blogs, written by people who are passionate about their topic and who write in an engaging manner are going to see success with their blogs and keep doing them.

    My 2 cents
    Ellen
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  • Profile picture of the author George185
    Why waste your time blogging when you can spend all day on Facebook? The less people blogging the better. We won't be bombarded with piles of useless drivel, just the stuff that matters. And internet marketers of course.
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    • Profile picture of the author mofi1616
      If blogging goes away something would have to take its place, I think it will have its ups and downs but its a vital artery of the internet. Its unfortunate that people are replacing the blogging with facebook, which only allows for short bursts of opinions. I hope it doesnt go away.
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  • Profile picture of the author Oxbloom
    This is like the third time this study or a similar one has come up on here. For whatever reason, the full picture is never spelled out.

    The stats show that among the teens/early-20's crowd, *DOING BLOGGING* is on a downward trend...

    While *READING BLOGS* continues to climb ever upward. Furthermore, the upward reading figures carried across age boundaries.

    What it means, if you understand really, really basic supply and demand, is that more and more people are demanding blogs, while fewer and fewer are writing them. Fewer still are writing them well.

    Does this sound to you like a recipe for a medium that's about to stop becoming profitable?
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  • Profile picture of the author fathertime
    Never! It is just evolving!

    It's all about "micro-blogging" now! Twitter has really made a serious impact on the blogging world and made it more convenient and simplified for everyone of all ages.

    Traditional blogging may not be as trendy to the younger crowds anymore, but they are still resourceful and popular to those over 21... In my opinion at least
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  • The thing is that keeping up with a decent blog is tons of work, and very few people are up for the job. It's like learning guitar when we were in our teens: we all tried because it looked cool, but 99% dropped it when we realized that we actually had to do some serious studying and practicing.
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  • Profile picture of the author Nancy Fleck
    RE: Blogging

    I beleive that blogging will never go away. When I want to know about anything, I google it. I ask google everything! If people stopped blogging about their knowledge, we would all be at a loss! The internet will always be hungry for good relevent content. If kids want to go to Twitter and Facebook to write blogs there, they will eventually grow up and google what they really need to know, not what somebody is doing at the moment. This will eventually even out. We are all hungry for something to read from someones personal experience. So, no I don't think blogging is dead, not by a long shot!!!

    Nancy Fleck
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  • Profile picture of the author paulie888
    Leave it to the news to skew things out of proportion. Kids at that tender young age would naturally not be interested in blogging anyway, so why even bring that up? It's only when reality sets in later and they become adults, and need to discover a source of income online and/or discover a passion for something and want to tell the world about it, that they turn to blogging as the solution to their issues. Some of these "studies" and "statistics" spouted off by the news are utterly nonsensical - pay no heed to them!

    Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author Nevin McQ
    When I read the article it mostly discussed 12 - 17 year olds and their decline of blogging. It told me because they did not want to write that much.

    The only thing I could think of is how can I get these distracted people in 10 years when they have real spending money.

    I would not be that concerned about it...
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  • Profile picture of the author Josh Anderson
    A totally useless and irrelevant statistic when it comes to making money... unless that is your business is selling blogging services to kids.

    What impact will that statistic have?

    Less blogs created by 12-17 year olds.

    Yawn.
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  • Profile picture of the author ForeignProfessor
    Two weeks ago a blog sold for $315m (The Huffington Post). That's not bad for an industry in decline eh?
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    • Profile picture of the author BeechHill
      Originally Posted by ForeignProfessor View Post

      Two weeks ago a blog sold for $315m (The Huffington Post). That's not bad for an industry in decline eh?
      My question would be, is why did she sell it so cheap?
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  • Profile picture of the author tentons
    Blogging might be going down from the mainstream, but I think you will see blogs still being persistent as ways of marketing products in specific niches.

    A shoes blog, a tennis racket blog etc... we all love our wordpress sites
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  • Profile picture of the author chasnsx
    Casual blogging is going away. Those folks whose latest post is "my cat threw up a hairball" have migrated to Facebook.

    What is happening is the same evolutionary process that took place in the early days. Remember when everyone was in an AOL chatroom? Then it was mailing lists, then it was online forums, and then everyone had to have a blog. Now all the folks who use the web casually are on Facebook and Twitter because it is easier.

    So now that all the amateurs are gone, that leaves the real blogs. A good blog post is an article and a good blog is an online magazine. So the amateurs move on to something else, and the professionals remain. Like any magazine publisher, you are only as good as the content you deliver.
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    • Profile picture of the author BeechHill
      Originally Posted by chasnsx View Post

      Casual blogging is going away. Those folks whose latest post is "my cat threw up a hairball" have migrated to Facebook.

      What is happening is the same evolutionary process that took place in the early days. Remember when everyone was in an AOL chatroom? Then it was mailing lists, then it was online forums, and then everyone had to have a blog. Now all the folks who use the web casually are on Facebook and Twitter because it is easier.

      So now that all the amateurs are gone, that leaves the real blogs. A good blog post is an article and a good blog is an online magazine. So the amateurs move on to something else, and the professionals remain. Like any magazine publisher, you are only as good as the content you deliver.
      Couldn’t agree with you more. From a marketing standpoint, a blog violates a couple of my rules, ease of entry and scalability. Too easy to get into and too hard to grow without constant tending. That is if you want to produce quality content, which is the only kind that makes long term money anyway.
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      • Profile picture of the author ExRat
        Hi,

        "Blogging is becoming less popular with young people, according to a Pew Research Center study, with the number of bloggers ages 12 to 17 declining by 50% between 2006 and 2009. That has left some mulling the future of the medium."
        There's nothing wrong with taking note of this particular decline, if that age range is important/relevant to you, but there's quite a lot wrong with the last sentence. It also doesn't make sense to only focus on 'bloggers' without also considering 'readers of blogs.'

        It's a bit like saying that the number of over 65s playing Call Of Duty on the xbox has halved, therefore some are mulling (over) the future of the game console industry.
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  • Profile picture of the author rts2271
    I think blogging is going to concentrate and become more powerful as most of the people with ADD have moved on. However I don't see blogging web sites having the draw as most articles will be read off feeds on aggregators.
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    • Profile picture of the author x3xsolxdierx3x
      I think that blogging is just so competitive, that it really isn't for the feint of heart. I think many give up and, I don't think MOST in the age range mentioned, have what it takes.

      (With a few exceptions, of course: Michael Dunlop, Alex Frazier, etc...)
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      • Profile picture of the author sebastianlatina
        Blogging will never die. I like a point stated earlier, the less that people blog, the less competition out there. Blogging will always be a useful tool. Even if your primary route for generating leads is via social networking, inviting others to read your blog is a great way to break the ice with that individual. They are able to get into your mind. They can see how organized and skilled you are with creating web content. People join people in network marketing, they don't join businesses. It's much easier to build a team selling your skills through a combination of techniques (social networking, blogging, ppc, etc.) rather than selling someone on a comp plan or product.
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  • Profile picture of the author DLMedia03
    Blogging as in, "hey this is what's going on in my life today" is most certainly going away in favor for more streamlined mediums (twitter, facebook), but blogging as a media and information tool is only getting stronger.
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  • Profile picture of the author MarkWrites
    Personal blogs may be on the decline and understandably so as Facebook and Twitter make spreading the word about the most mundane things going on in your life so much easier.

    That being said, blogging from a marketing or business model perspective isn't going anywhere anytime soon.
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  • Profile picture of the author smartdoctor
    It is not the end of blogging but the beginning of social networking that is bring all this confusion
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  • Profile picture of the author jushuaburnham
    Blogging is becoming less popular but it doesn't it loses its aroma, blogging is still helpful for marketing.
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