Who Said It's Hard To Sell Fiction On The Kindle

99 replies
So, I've been reading some threads about publishing on the Kindle lately, and aside from people like Amanda Hocking and famous fiction writers, I keep hearing that it's hard to sell fiction on the Kindle. Well, I published a short 30 page fiction novelette a few days ago and it's already sold a few copies.

Is anyone else out there having luck selling fiction literature on the Kindle, and I'm not talking about erotica.
#fiction #hard #kindle #sell
  • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
    Originally Posted by Ken_Caudill View Post

    Was it genre fiction? Does it sell without reviews? I'm going to be publishing some fiction there soon. Any tips would be appreciated.
    It's young adult paranormal fiction and yes, there were no reviews. It's literally only been published for a few days.

    My best tip at this point would be to make sure you have a decent cover design that will, if not tempt people into buying, at least look professional enough for them to take your book seriously. Also, use the tags to help identify your audience.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
      Originally Posted by cosmokid View Post

      That's great that you're making sales already. So this would be a Kindle Single, right? Right now Kindle Singles are being listed in the Kindle Bestseller area, so this is getting more exposure for these works. I'm concerned that they will split these up again and people might not find the singles as easily before too long.

      The other night I purchased my first Kindle Single, an 18 page humorous memoir short that only had maybe ten reviews, and it was priced at 2.99. Left you wanting to read more by that author. So I think singles can be a great way of interesting people in your future work and getting a readership going.

      I wish you the best! Keep on writing!
      This book is actually a part of a series that should have about 6 other parts to it, all much longer than the first. I just threw the first one out as kind of a pilot to the series. I had originally published a free version of it on one of my niche websites to see how well it would be received. Most of the people on there loved it. So, after discovering Kindle publishing I thought I'd put it on there and see how it does. I guess it would probably benefit me to add some reviews from my website onto the description.

      Right now I have it priced at .99, but once some buzz gets around, if it picks up the way that I'd like it to, I'll probably raise the price whenever X amount of copies sell.
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      • Profile picture of the author paulie888
        Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

        This book is actually a part of a series that should have about 6 other parts to it, all much longer than the first. I just threw the first one out as kind of a pilot to the series. I had originally published a free version of it on one of my niche websites to see how well it would be received. Most of the people on there loved it. So, after discovering Kindle publishing I thought I'd put it on there and see how it does. I guess it would probably benefit me to add some reviews from my website onto the description.

        Right now I have it priced at .99, but once some buzz gets around, if it picks up the way that I'd like it to, I'll probably raise the price whenever X amount of copies sell.
        I read in one of the articles about successful Kindle publishing that a fairly well-known Kindle author (can't recall his name) employs a dynamic pricing strategy to keep his ebook on top of the bestseller lists - he starts it off low at 99 cents to get the sales volume and for it to get listed as a bestseller, and then raises the price to $2.99 or higher. Once it falls off the list, he cuts the price down to 99 cents again, and goes through this same cycle multiple times.

        Apparently this strategy has worked in his favor, and he has been able to keep his ebook on top the bestsellers lists for at least several months now.

        Paul
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        • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
          Originally Posted by paulie888 View Post

          I read in one of the articles about successful Kindle publishing that a fairly well-known Kindle author (can't recall his name) employs a dynamic pricing strategy to keep his ebook on top of the bestseller lists - he starts it off low at 99 cents to get the sales volume and for it to get listed as a bestseller, and then raises the price to $2.99 or higher. Once it falls off the list, he cuts the price down to 99 cents again, and goes through this same cycle multiple times.

          Apparently this strategy has worked in his favor, and he has been able to keep his ebook on top the bestsellers lists for at least several months now.

          Paul
          I'm not sure of who you are speaking, but I plan on employing a similar strategy. If you're not well known, I think that starting out at 99 cents is almost essential to gain buyer interest, especially in fiction niches.

          It's probably not the same for non-fiction niches, since many consumers would be more readily willing to part with their money if they thought that they could find the solution to their problems in a book.

          Either way, I plan on using the above strategy on everything that I publish. When demand is low, lower the price, when demand is high, raise the price. Simple economics.
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          • Profile picture of the author Mike McAleer
            Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

            I'm not sure of who you are speaking, but I plan on employing a similar strategy. If you're not well known, I think that starting out at 99 cents is almost essential to gain buyer interest, especially in fiction niches.

            It's probably not the same for non-fiction niches, since many consumers would be more readily willing to part with their money if they thought that they could find the solution to their problems in a book.

            Either way, I plan on using the above strategy on everything that I publish. When demand is low, lower the price, when demand is high, raise the price. Simple economics.
            That is true about utilising simple economics. Without setting your prices correctly, you could be missing out on profits...
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          • Profile picture of the author drmani
            Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

            I'm not sure of who you are speaking, but I plan on employing a similar strategy. If you're not well known, I think that starting out at 99 cents is almost essential to gain buyer interest, especially in fiction niches.
            ...
            Either way, I plan on using the above strategy on everything that I publish. When demand is low, lower the price, when demand is high, raise the price. Simple economics.
            I may be over-thinking this process, but am stuck between going ahead with a
            Kindle promotion for my novel because of a concern... how does this scale?

            Let's say you sell 100 copies on the Kindle at $2.99. What next?

            Your next novel/novella may sell 100 or even 200 - but at not a great price,
            leaving a modest profit only. And then, you're writing more and more for a
            very slowly increasing readership.

            Is the idea of a Kindle launch to catch the eye of an agent/publisher, so you
            can go mainstream with fiction?

            With NON-fiction, I'm convinced traditional publishing is NOT the way ahead,
            and direct marketing at higher price points can be very lucrative. But fiction
            marketing is a completely different beast, I think.

            What is your overall or ultimate strategic destination - to build a big readership
            through your Kindle sales, or find an entry into traditional publishing via this
            route?

            Thanks for sharing your thoughts on this, I'm sure others will also find it
            helpful.

            All success
            Dr.Mani
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            • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
              Originally Posted by drmani View Post

              I may be over-thinking this process, but am stuck between going ahead with a
              Kindle promotion for my novel because of a concern... how does this scale?

              Let's say you sell 100 copies on the Kindle at $2.99. What next?

              Your next novel/novella may sell 100 or even 200 - but at not a great price,
              leaving a modest profit only. And then, you're writing more and more for a
              very slowly increasing readership.

              Is the idea of a Kindle launch to catch the eye of an agent/publisher, so you
              can go mainstream with fiction?

              With NON-fiction, I'm convinced traditional publishing is NOT the way ahead,
              and direct marketing at higher price points can be very lucrative. But fiction
              marketing is a completely different beast, I think.

              What is your overall or ultimate strategic destination - to build a big readership
              through your Kindle sales, or find an entry into traditional publishing via this
              route?

              Thanks for sharing your thoughts on this, I'm sure others will also find it
              helpful.

              All success
              Dr.Mani
              Ultimately I'd love to be picked up by a reputable publisher, but I'll settle for slow and steady wins the race. I write fiction because I love writing it. Knowing that other people are buying/reading it is just a reward that goes a long with it.

              I did go ahead and publish a physical copy of the first novelette. I also finished the second one in the series and submitted that to the Kindle and CreateSpace as well.

              Here is my strategy, which I'm currently testing. I'm writing this series of short novelettes so that there will be several in the series, approximately 7. By making them short, it allows me to produce them faster. By making a series, it pretty much ensures that anyone who reads and enjoys the first one will look forward to buying subsequent novelettes in the series. If I wrote it all into one book, which would easily be possible, I would probably only realistically be able to change $0.99 for the book while I'm waiting for it to get noticed. Then, after people read it, while they may be interested in my work, they would have to wait for however long it would take me to create another full length novel, and by that time they could have forgotten about me completely.

              By writing a short series. #1) I get to charge $0.99 cents per novelette. #2) The fact that it's a series will increase the chance that interested buyers who have read the first novelette will keep checking back for new additions to the series which will equal more sales for me. If the series becomes popular, then word of mouth will spread it. If best comes to best then I will eventually be able to hike up the price of each novelette, thus further increasing profit.

              If a group of people enjoy one of your series, they'll likely be interested in whatever you put out next that's within their genre, creating a stream of repeat buyers. Pretty much the same principle with creating multiple products in the same niche with internet marketing.

              $2.99 isn't a lot of money, but if your book goes viral then it can blow up fast. Imagine selling 100,000 copies a month. (Probably not realistic, but it does happen. Think Amanda Hocking.)

              Also keep in mind, that as a marketer, I'm not just putting my work on the Kindle and hoping for the best. I will be doing promotions via press releases and other methods, bringing the readers to me instead of waiting for them.

              For non-fiction, my thought process is the same as yours. I imagine that I would probably do much better throwing up a squeeze page and selling an ebook version of my non-fiction via ejunkie or Clickbank. Obviously the income difference is vast. On Kindle you would probably only get a few dollars for something that you could sell for $40 on your own website.

              Two different beasts, as you said.
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            • Profile picture of the author Paul Coleman
              Originally Posted by drmani View Post


              Let's say you sell 100 copies on the Kindle at $2.99. What next?

              Your next novel/novella may sell 100 or even 200 - but at not a great price,
              leaving a modest profit only. And then, you're writing more and more for a
              very slowly increasing readership.

              Is the idea of a Kindle launch to catch the eye of an agent/publisher, so you
              can go mainstream with fiction?

              All success
              Dr.Mani
              Hi Doc,

              All your Kindle books keep collecting readers. So as you add books, you will get a cumulative effect. You are looking for critical mass. The mantra when it comes to Kindle sales is: "Write another book."

              By the way, many successful Kindle authors have turned down publishing deals. And some have made a "partial" deal where they keep all rights to their current books, but sell the rights to the next three in the series.

              Paul
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          • Profile picture of the author paulie888
            Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

            I'm not sure of who you are speaking, but I plan on employing a similar strategy. If you're not well known, I think that starting out at 99 cents is almost essential to gain buyer interest, especially in fiction niches.

            It's probably not the same for non-fiction niches, since many consumers would be more readily willing to part with their money if they thought that they could find the solution to their problems in a book.

            Either way, I plan on using the above strategy on everything that I publish. When demand is low, lower the price, when demand is high, raise the price. Simple economics.
            If I remember correctly, this author is a fairly well known fiction writer that has been on Kindle for a while now. I'll try to dig his name up sometime soon, as I'm sure you are interested in knowing who he is.

            I'm pretty sure that when an ebook is priced at 99 cents and has already garnered good reviews, it becomes an irresistible impulse purchase that will attract many buyers that otherwise would not consider picking it up.

            Paul

            EDIT: I believe this author's name is John Locke.
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    • Profile picture of the author Fun to Write
      I'm planning on publishing some fiction on Kindle soon.

      How did you get your covers designed?

      Did you do it yourself or pay a designer?


      Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

      My best tip at this point would be to make sure you have a decent cover design that will, if not tempt people into buying, at least look professional enough for them to take your book seriously. Also, use the tags to help identify your audience.
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      • Profile picture of the author Canuckystan
        I've had crime fiction on Kindle for a year now, with 4 and 5 star reviews, lots of promoting through book review blogs, forums etc etc.

        A very good month is $150. A bad month is $30. There are more bad than good months. Many more. My book is $1.99.

        Do it because you love writing fiction - you can make much more with less effort doing many other things.

        The number of self-published ebooks loading to Kindle is absolutely huge. You need to make a massive effort to be seen (and purchased) above the crowd.

        Remember that those who are successful now started 1 or 2 years ago when there were a fraction of the books that are available now. The number has grown by over 10X since then. And big publishers are starting to drop their prices. Before there was very little available at low cost. Now there are mountains of books available at cheap prices. Just saying.

        I think you can make much more writing a non-fiction ebook and selling it yourself on a nicely ranked website.
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      • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
        Originally Posted by Fun to Write View Post

        I'm planning on publishing some fiction on Kindle soon.

        How did you get your covers designed?

        Did you do it yourself or pay a designer?
        Then first one, I paid someone on Fiverr . . . and it came out absolutely horrid, so I ended up redesigning it myself. I know that a lot of people recommend finding people to do ecover design on Fiverr, but you need to keep in mind that most ebook cover designers on Fiverr are limited to what images they can get for free and if you're publishing a fiction novel that is going to need any type of creativity in regards to design, Fiverr is probably not the place to find an ebook cover designer. However, if you're trying to sell a non-fiction book in a popular niche, you'll probably do just fine paying someone from Fiverr to design your cover.

        With my first novelette, I found some free images via stock.xchng - the leading free stock photography site and designed my cover to my liking over at eBook Cover Creator - eCover Design Online Free It was simple, fun, and inexpensive.

        For the second novelette in my series, I started by publishing on CreateSpace, took one of their basic cover designs, inserted my own image, and published that way. Cost $0.

        Your ebook cover design does not have to cost you a fortune. It just needs to be professional looking, and that's easy enough to achieve on your own using simple software.
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      • Profile picture of the author edlewis
        Originally Posted by Fun to Write View Post

        I'm planning on publishing some fiction on Kindle soon.

        How did you get your covers designed?

        Did you do it yourself or pay a designer?
        Designers are great...and the really great one's do an amazing job. But...for most people it's not feasible to lay out $200 or $300+ for a cover before ever selling a copy.

        The best way is to use stock images...

        I know money can be tight at times, but if you can't invest $12 or so to buy some credits over at Fotolia or Bigstockphoto...then you are digging yourself a hole and possibly setting yourself up to fail.

        As for ecovers....I don't use them on Kindle. There is no need. And my testing has shown a flat image converts better. No one is using ecovers except "internet marketers" and Kindle spammers who simply re-publish tired old PLR.
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    • Profile picture of the author steverich
      Don't judge a book by it's cover .................... or do!
      Been looking into producing kindle products, and yes, image is everything (well it sure helps)
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    • Profile picture of the author JayPeete
      Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

      My best tip at this point would be to make sure you have a decent cover design that will, if not tempt people into buying, at least look professional enough for them to take your book seriously.
      I also publish on the Kindle (haven't tried fiction yet) and I know that the cover is really important. Unfortunately people still judge a book by its cover...
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  • Profile picture of the author dgridley
    That's encouraging.. I'd been thinking of trying my luck as well. Nice to hear about even samll successes.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rose Anderson
    I've been thinking about publishing some short fiction on kindle. How many pages do the singles ususally run?

    Thanks for sharing!
    Rose
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  • Profile picture of the author TeamGlobal
    Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

    So, I've been reading some threads about publishing on the Kindle lately, and aside from people like Amanda Hocking and famous fiction writers, I keep hearing that it's hard to sell fiction on the Kindle. Well, I published a short 30 page fiction novelette a few days ago and it's already sold a few copies.

    Is anyone else out there having luck selling fiction literature on the Kindle, and I'm not talking about erotica.
    Congrats!

    That's very cool. I haven't published on Kindle yet, but it's nice to know that there is an interest in fiction.

    It might be time for me to dig up some of my old sci fi short stories.

    All The Very Best,


    Tony
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  • Profile picture of the author Sarah S
    Just out of curiosity, about how much of a commission do you earn as an author every time someone buys your book on Kindle?
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    • Profile picture of the author nursewriter
      You earn a 35% royalty payment on books priced 2.98 and under. For books priced 2.99 and up you can earn 70% royalties. I think there are restrictions on this depending on the country.

      Self publishing is fast becoming a great way to get your books published. Kindle has really leveled the playing field for authors.

      However, this has to be said....if you want to make good money publishing your book on Kindle you must take it serious. Quality is the key because your sales depend upon the readers' reviews of your book.

      I will be publishing fiction on Kindle in the near future but only after I have edited and then re-edited and then hired an editor to edit my work again. I will also have my book covers developed by a real artist. (This is something I will definitely not attempt myself however my daughter is an amazing artist so I have an advantage here)

      There are indie Kindle authors out there that are bringing thousands in each month. However, they have all the essential elements in place that make a great book.
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      • Profile picture of the author imon32red
        I know plenty of people that do well on the Kindle. In fact I have several fiction books under different pen names that do well.

        I am currently writing a fiction series and piecing together some nonfiction stuff for a couple of other books.

        I like to target the 70% commission range when I publish my books. I make way more from ebooks than I ever do with the print version. In fact, I personally know indie writers that make a five figure monthly income from the Kindle alone.
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        • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
          Originally Posted by imon32red View Post

          I know plenty of people that do well on the Kindle. In fact I have several fiction books under different pen names that do well.

          I am currently writing a fiction series and piecing together some nonfiction stuff for a couple of other books.

          I like to target the 70% commission range when I publish my books. I make way more from ebooks than I ever do with the print version. In fact, I personally know indie writers that make a five figure monthly income from the Kindle alone.
          Yeah, I don't picture myself attacking the print media side of it until the digital kicks off a bit better, though I was originally going to publish it on CreateSpace.

          I think that if you want to do fiction writing, now is probably the right time with the rise of the Kindle.
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          • Profile picture of the author Andyhenry
            Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

            Yeah, I don't picture myself attacking the print media side of it until the digital kicks off a bit better, though I was originally going to publish it on CreateSpace.

            I think that if you want to do fiction writing, now is probably the right time with the rise of the Kindle.
            That's funny - I have the opposite approach. I've only been doing physical books until lately and now going for kindle publishing.
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            • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
              Originally Posted by Andyhenry View Post

              That's funny - I have the opposite approach. I've only been doing physical books until lately and now going for kindle publishing.
              Same here. I'm just getting to publish my first paperback as a Kindle e-book.

              Kindle e-books are rising but paperbacks are still the majority. CreateSpace makes it so easy that you can have your cake and eat it too... meaning publishing your book for Kindle and paperback at the same time.
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              • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
                Originally Posted by Alan Petersen View Post

                Same here. I'm just getting to publish my first paperback as a Kindle e-book.

                Kindle e-books are rising but paperbacks are still the majority. CreateSpace makes it so easy that you can have your cake and eat it too... meaning publishing your book for Kindle and paperback at the same time.
                I just worry that the price they charge (pre my commission) for a 32 page novelette is a bit more than most people would be willing to pay. With $0 commission selling it through Amazon on CreateSpace, the lowest price they'll allow me to sell it for is $6.10. Seems a bit high for something only 32 pages that's NOT in the IM niche. lol Just had to add that. :p

                I definitely plan on selling physical copies of my longer novels though.

                Do you guys have the Pro Plan through CreateSpace? And if so, is it worth it?
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                • Profile picture of the author drmani
                  Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

                  I definitely plan on selling physical copies of my longer novels though.

                  Do you guys have the Pro Plan through CreateSpace? And if so, is it worth it?
                  The Pro plan, through added commissions, can pay for itself if you make
                  enough sales (you can do the math and calculate how many copies you
                  need to sell to hit that level). Also, you get 'extended distribution' (not
                  sure if it's generally available nowadays, when I signed up a couple of
                  years ago, it was a Pro level feature) - which gets your book into many
                  channels not otherwise available.

                  A nice 'extra' was that (probably because of the number of sales generated)
                  they waived my annual fee for the 2nd year of Pro plan, so I got two years
                  for the price of one

                  Hope this helps.

                  All success
                  Dr.Mani

                  P.S. - Please keep us posted about how sales of your fiction work goes.
                  I'm still torn between self-publishing my novel on CreateSpace and Kindle
                  versus trying to find a publisher. Hoped the Amazon.com Breakthrough
                  Novel Award would offer an opportunity, but my submission didn't make
                  the cut to go to phase 2
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                • Profile picture of the author mediahog
                  Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

                  I just worry that the price they charge (pre my commission) for a 32 page novelette is a bit more than most people would be willing to pay. With $0 commission selling it through Amazon on CreateSpace, the lowest price they'll allow me to sell it for is $6.10. Seems a bit high for something only 32 pages that's NOT in the IM niche. lol Just had to add that. :p

                  I definitely plan on selling physical copies of my longer novels though.

                  Do you guys have the Pro Plan through CreateSpace? And if so, is it worth it?
                  If you have a series of Novelette's, you can put them in to a physical product as a collection and then sell them.
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      • Profile picture of the author drmani
        Originally Posted by nursewriter View Post

        However, this has to be said....if you want to make good money publishing your book on Kindle you must take it serious. Quality is the key because your sales depend upon the readers' reviews of your book.
        You may well be right, though I'll take a different stance and state that the
        MARKETING of one's Kindle ebook matters more than how well you package
        and present the content itself. (I completely agree about "reader's reviews"!)

        In a week's promotion, I took my Kindle version of "47 Hearts" to #5 on the
        Motivational books and #7 on Personal Management sections - and the ebook
        itself is formatted VERY plainly, and even has some formatting errors which
        I couldn't get fixed in time for the launch.

        Oh, and all it took was 7 days of INTENSE promotion to get that going.

        Just saying

        All success
        Dr.Mani
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        • Profile picture of the author cherylwright
          Originally Posted by drmani View Post

          You may well be right, though I'll take a different stance and state that the
          MARKETING of one's Kindle ebook matters more than how well you package and present the content itself.
          Does that mean Kindle promotions should be handled differently to other book promotions?

          I am planning on selling my current self-published non-fiction ebooks via Kindle in the near future.

          Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.




          Cheryl
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      • Profile picture of the author Don Schenk
        Originally Posted by nursewriter View Post

        You earn a 35% royalty payment on books priced 2.98 and under. For books priced 2.99 and up you can earn 70% royalties. I think there are restrictions on this depending on the country.
        Are these numbers correct?

        Daniel Hall ran a webinar a week or two ago to Mike Carraway's list. During the webinar he showed the way Amazon pays to authors of kindle books.

        Authors have a choice of earning either 35% or 70%. And must set up their account for each kingle book one way or the other.

        In order to receive 70% authors must agree to keep the price between $2.99 and $9.99. If authors agree to the 35% model, they can price their kindle books from 99 cents up to $200.

        :-Don
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike McAleer
    I was considering putting a marketing ebook on their. Would that work or only fiction?
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    • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
      Originally Posted by drmani View Post

      The Pro plan, through added commissions, can pay for itself if you make
      enough sales (you can do the math and calculate how many copies you
      need to sell to hit that level). Also, you get 'extended distribution' (not
      sure if it's generally available nowadays, when I signed up a couple of
      years ago, it was a Pro level feature) - which gets your book into many
      channels not otherwise available.

      A nice 'extra' was that (probably because of the number of sales generated)
      they waived my annual fee for the 2nd year of Pro plan, so I got two years
      for the price of one

      Hope this helps.

      All success
      Dr.Mani

      P.S. - Please keep us posted about how sales of your fiction work goes.
      I'm still torn between self-publishing my novel on CreateSpace and Kindle
      versus trying to find a publisher. Hoped the Amazon.com Breakthrough
      Novel Award would offer an opportunity, but my submission didn't make
      the cut to go to phase 2
      Finding a publisher is a real pain, especially for fiction novels. My dream career is to be a fiction writer, not even a super famous one, just enough to pay the bills so that I can do what I love for the rest of my life and make money from it. I've written a few full length novels. I sent one out to about 20 different publishers. One publisher almost picked it up but things ended up falling through. It sucked and completely killed my desire to write for several years. After hearing about people having great success with the Kindle I've decided to give it another go.

      You may have better luck than I did finding a traditional publisher due to the fact that you're a doctor, but it's definitely hard to break through. I wish you the best of luck if you choose to go that route.

      Originally Posted by Mike McAleer View Post

      I was considering putting a marketing ebook on their. Would that work or only fiction?
      I hear that marketing books do well on the Kindle.
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    • Profile picture of the author paulie888
      Originally Posted by Mike McAleer View Post

      I was considering putting a marketing ebook on their. Would that work or only fiction?
      Definitely, you can sell both fiction and non-fiction ebooks on Kindle, but of course sales are not guaranteed.
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    • Profile picture of the author Brianne
      Originally Posted by Mike McAleer View Post

      I was considering putting a marketing ebook on their. Would that work or only fiction?
      I've seen marketing ebooks on there...been looking into selling on kindle lately myself.
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  • Profile picture of the author Andrea Wilson
    Wow congratulations to your success! I rarely read Fiction stories in my kindle but seems a lot of people think different. I will spread the word.

    Andrea
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  • Profile picture of the author P.Sharma
    Congratulations on your success, just goes to show that the ways to make money online are limitless....way to go
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  • Profile picture of the author Kristy Taylor
    As for "extended distribution" go straight to LSI as that's who Creatspace and Lulu use anyway, and receive up to 80% "royalties" with no restrictions on retail price (if you truly self-publish you don't receive "royalties" you receive "profits").

    Ta
    Kristy
    Signature

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    • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
      Originally Posted by Kristy Taylor View Post

      As for "extended distribution" go straight to LSI as that's who Creatspace and Lulu use anyway, and receive up to 80% "royalties" with no restrictions on retail price (if you truly self-publish you don't receive "royalties" you receive "profits").

      Ta
      Kristy
      Is this the correct link to LSI? https://www.lightningsource.com/default.aspx
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
      Originally Posted by Kristy Taylor View Post

      As for "extended distribution" go straight to LSI as that's who Creatspace and Lulu use anyway, and receive up to 80% "royalties" with no restrictions on retail price (if you truly self-publish you don't receive "royalties" you receive "profits").

      Ta
      Kristy
      Agree on the extended distribution but CreateSpace doesn't use LSI to print like LuLu does. They even tried to strong-arm LSI out of the picture a few years ago but Ingram is too big so they couldn't do it and now work with them.

      Great info on CreateSpace extended distribution from Aaron Sheppard:

      CreateSpace Connections (Expanded Distribution Channel, Lightning Source, Ingram, Baker & Taylor)

      His books are great for self publishers.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kristy Taylor
    Yep, I've been using them since 2004.

    Ta
    Kristy
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  • Profile picture of the author cherylwright
    Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

    So, I've been reading some threads about publishing on the Kindle lately, and aside from people like Amanda Hocking and famous fiction writers, I keep hearing that it's hard to sell fiction on the Kindle. Well, I published a short 30 page fiction novelette a few days ago and it's already sold a few copies.

    Is anyone else out there having luck selling fiction literature on the Kindle, and I'm not talking about erotica.

    A friend of mine recently published fiction on Kindle. She made more in a week with Kindle, than I've made in several months with a traditional publisher.

    That's the great thing about Kindle, from what I've read, because you get much higher 'royalties'. With a traditional publisher, everyone has their finger in the pie.




    Cheryl
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  • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
    Originally Posted by Chris Kent View Post

    To the OP, you said you tried publishers. What about sending your draft to agents too? Many publishers won't even look at submissions anymore unless they go via an agent.

    Out of interest, what limits does kindle place on fiction? Can you write a book about a drug-fuelled serial killing terrorist, for example? Or are there limits?
    They have content guidelines...

    Amazon.com Help: Content Guidelines
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
      One thing I've noticed from visiting several of these best-selling self-publishing type authors and even published ones websites... no opt-in form. Doesn't look like they do list-building.

      When you have a new book you could email your list. Ask them to leave you review on Amazon, etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kristy Taylor
    "Amazon depends on Lightning as a pillar of CreateSpace distribution"

    CreateSpace Connections (Expanded Distribution Channel, Lightning Source, Ingram, Baker & Taylor)

    Ta
    Kristy
    Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author Kristy Taylor
    No my post started with: As for "extended distribution" go straight to LSI

    I've known Aaron from many lists for approx. 7 years now.

    Ta
    Kristy
    Signature

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  • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
    Originally Posted by Alan Petersen View Post

    Agree on the extended distribution but CreateSpace doesn't use LSI to print like LuLu does. They even tried to strong-arm LSI out of the picture a few years ago but Ingram is too big so they couldn't do it and now work with them.

    Great info on CreateSpace extended distribution from Aaron Sheppard:

    CreateSpace Connections (Expanded Distribution Channel, Lightning Source, Ingram, Baker & Taylor)

    His books are great for self publishers.
    After reading all of that, it seems like you'd be better off publishing with Lightning Source, but the cost of purchasing ISBNs and what not would make CreateSpace the cheaper option of the two, despite the fact that your book won't reach as far.


    Originally Posted by Chris Kent View Post

    To the OP, you said you tried publishers. What about sending your draft to agents too? Many publishers won't even look at submissions anymore unless they go via an agent.

    Out of interest, what limits does kindle place on fiction? Can you write a book about a drug-fuelled serial killing terrorist, for example? Or are there limits?
    I really don't think I have the energy to deal with so much rejection again. I'm not sure how getting an agent would work, but if it was anything like trying to find a publisher, then I'd rather pass on having my creative energy bled from me.

    And as far as Kindle fiction goes, you can literally write about anything . . . except for books that promote pedophilia apparently, as there was a big ruckus about that a while back. You can imagine that leaves the playing field wide open though.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
      Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

      After reading all of that, it seems like you'd be better off publishing with Lightning Source, but the cost of purchasing ISBNs and what not would make CreateSpace the cheaper option of the two, despite the fact that your book won't reach as far.
      Agreed. CreateSpace is more newbie friendly cost-wise and setup-wise. You're not stuck with one or the other. Folks can get their feet wet with CreateSpace and later they can go with LSI.

      The important thing is not to get into analysis paralysis mode and publish be it CreateSpace or LSI.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jaysmyne
    Kindle eh? I was thinking of writing an Ethnography based off an experience I had two years ago. I'm thinking of making it my research project at the university I attend I was thinking if I did write it I could publish it but perhaps publishing it on the kindle might be the best way to go!
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    Xo, Faith and DanielleFaith.me
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  • Profile picture of the author Stuart S
    Well done.

    Over the past month I've probably made about $3 selling non-fiction stuff on kindle, but now I might publish a short play I have lying around.

    Hopefully it does well.

    The only problem is creating the graphic for the book.
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  • Profile picture of the author wendyloohoo67
    That's so great! Congratulations! I've been thinking of publishing a novel I wrote a few years back. Need to dust if off, clean it up and give it a go. Thanks for the inspiration!
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  • Profile picture of the author lesterlim85
    I seriously love the idea of publishing a book on Kindle. You are right to point out Amanda Hocking, though not everyone can emulate the success (and talent and passion) that she had.

    Pity that I'm not really cut out to be a writer, but this is a very good idea, and I applaud the OP's success.

    Wishing OP all the best in making your series best sellers on Kindle!

    Cheers,
    Lester
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  • Profile picture of the author Mindz
    Im Glad I Found This Thread ? My Only Question Who Is Amanda Hocking ?
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Bard
    I'm probably overlooking something simple but I'm having a hard time figuring out the formatting for Kindle.

    Do any of you know where to find templates for the formatting?

    Thanks

    Matt
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
      Originally Posted by Matt Maiden View Post

      I'm probably overlooking something simple but I'm having a hard time figuring out the formatting for Kindle.

      Do any of you know where to find templates for the formatting?

      Thanks

      Matt
      Not sure if you've seen it...

      Amazon KDP Support : Support Home

      Click on the formatting guide.
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      • Profile picture of the author Martin Luxton
        I would appreciate some feedback on leadtimes.

        Amazon says 24-48 hours after submission for your book to be available on their store. In your experience, do they stick to that?

        It's important because I'm doing a spoof book for April 1st and I have to time its release just right.


        Martin
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        • Profile picture of the author Zabrina
          Originally Posted by Martin Luxton View Post

          I would appreciate some feedback on leadtimes.

          Amazon says 24-48 hours after submission for your book to be available on their store. In your experience, do they stick to that?

          It's important because I'm doing a spoof book for April 1st and I have to time its release just right.


          Martin
          Yes... I published my first Kindle short story on Sunday. It isn't yet published, though it might be by the end of the day.
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          • Profile picture of the author MagicAce
            Does anyone have any advice for someone who's first language is not english? I really enjoy writing fiction and I am good at it. Kindle would be good for me if I could write english very well.
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            • Profile picture of the author HigherPrThanGod
              Does Kindle offer screenplays?
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            • Profile picture of the author imon32red
              Originally Posted by MagicAce View Post

              Does anyone have any advice for someone who's first language is not english? I really enjoy writing fiction and I am good at it. Kindle would be good for me if I could write english very well.
              I would write it in your native tongue. My brother is bilingual and speaks English and German. The German speaking Kindle market started to take off last year. I would publish it first in your native language. If it takes off you could use the money to have it translated into English.
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              I'm not selling anything.
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          • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
            Originally Posted by Martin Luxton View Post

            I would appreciate some feedback on leadtimes.

            Amazon says 24-48 hours after submission for your book to be available on their store. In your experience, do they stick to that?

            It's important because I'm doing a spoof book for April 1st and I have to time its release just right.


            Martin
            I did a lot of edits on the first novelette that I published. Usually they had it up in 24 hours or less. The second novelette I published took the whole 48 hours.

            Originally Posted by Zabrina View Post

            Yes... I published my first Kindle short story on Sunday. It isn't yet published, though it might be by the end of the day.
            You'll have to let us know if you get any sales right out of the gate. From what I've noticed, a lot of people see sales right after their book/story is published.

            I just published the second part to my novelette series and it's already gotten a sale. I haven't even begun promoting the series yet because I want to wait until I get my proof copies from CreateSpace before I start writing and submitting press releases.
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        • Profile picture of the author edlewis
          Originally Posted by Martin Luxton View Post

          I would appreciate some feedback on leadtimes.

          Amazon says 24-48 hours after submission for your book to be available on their store. In your experience, do they stick to that?

          It's important because I'm doing a spoof book for April 1st and I have to time its release just right.


          Martin
          Martin,

          I'd give it a good 48 hours.

          Sometimes it is faster than that, but you will want it out sooner rather than later just to be sure.

          Are you promoting this?

          I ask because while Amazon will publish Kindle ebooks in 24-48 hours....it will take much longer than that for your ebook to actually start to show up in Amazon search results....and suggestion results.

          It's going to take a week, maybe even two weeks for your ebook to show up anywhere on Amazon...unless people are searching for it by name or you are directing traffic to it.
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          • Profile picture of the author Martin Luxton
            Originally Posted by edlewis View Post

            Martin,

            Are you promoting this?

            [snip] unless people are searching for it by name or you are directing traffic to it.
            Ed,

            Promotion with press releases, Youtube videos, blog posts, forum links and contacting sites that specialise in humour.

            So, if I submit the Kindle book around the 26th March, I should have a couple of days' grace before the 1st April.


            Martin
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            • Profile picture of the author edlewis
              Originally Posted by Martin Luxton View Post

              Ed,

              Promotion with press releases, Youtube videos, blog posts, forum links and contacting sites that specialise in humour.

              So, if I submit the Kindle book around the 26th March, I should have a couple of days' grace before the 1st April.


              Martin
              Yeah...I've had books show up on Amazon in less than 24 hours....

              Even though they still say "Publishing" in my Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) account, as long as they have an ASIN number under them, they are up on Amazon.

              Just take that ASIN number and copy and paste it into Amazon's search...your ebook should show up.

              The only hiccup MIGHT be if you are in the UK. I'm not in the UK so I'm not 100% sure the upload times will match up.

              If you're curious just take a random file and do a test run. Upload a book in the next couple of days...and see how long the process takes.

              Don't worry about what you publish for this test run...you can always unpublish it....

              This should help take some of the mystery out of it for you.
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    • Profile picture of the author Don Schenk
      Originally Posted by Matt Maiden View Post

      I'm probably overlooking something simple but I'm having a hard time figuring out the formatting for Kindle.

      Do any of you know where to find templates for the formatting?

      Thanks

      Matt
      I was wondering the same thing and came across a blog by Aaron Shepard in which he explains it...

      From Word to Kindle (Kindle Books, Microsoft Word, formatting ebooks)

      :-Don
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    • Profile picture of the author sethczerepak
      You know, I've been wondering about this...why not market your own fiction works? That's all publishers do anyway. If you could get this down, I bet you could create a product and make a lot of sales...I'd be one of them.
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      • Profile picture of the author Canuckystan
        That's a massive uphill battle. Amazon (and the others) have one-click purchase, reviews, forum, "buy this if you liked that" marketing for your book, etc., - all the things readers need to decide to purchase. Plus Amazon gives the purchase some legitimacy over a fiction book on a separate site.

        Specialized non-fiction ebooks would likely do better sold apart from Kindle, etc.


        Originally Posted by sethczerepak View Post

        You know, I've been wondering about this...why not market your own fiction works? That's all publishers do anyway. If you could get this down, I bet you could create a product and make a lot of sales...I'd be one of them.
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        • Profile picture of the author Ofthemix
          Originally Posted by Canuckystan View Post

          That's a massive uphill battle. Amazon (and the others) have one-click purchase, reviews, forum, "buy this if you liked that" marketing for your book, etc., - all the things readers need to decide to purchase. Plus Amazon gives the purchase some legitimacy over a fiction book on a separate site.

          Specialized non-fiction ebooks would likely do better sold apart from Kindle, etc.
          This is true, but you can also go outside of Amazon to funnel people to your Amazon sales page. Here's a post that I wrote in another thread:

          You can promote your book through press releases, youtube videos, and article marketing. These methods should work well for driving targeted traffic to your ebooks. I highly recommend creating and distributing a press release for each individual title.

          I also recommend building an authors website where you can showcase all of your work and add a blog. This would be a method to use if you plan on writing a multitude of books under one author name or pen name. That way people can subscribe to your RSS feed or sign up to your list so that they'll be informed of whenever you publish a new novel, which could equal a good spike in sales every time you publish something new. You could also alternatively create a niche website if you plan on only writing for a certain niche, then drive traffic to that website. For the website I built, I'm using all of the tried and true traffic generation methods that I use on my income producing websites.
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    • Profile picture of the author Andrew Skelly
      I smell a potential WSO "How to sell your book on Kindle"

      I'd buy it.
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    • Profile picture of the author Cliff_OBA
      This is very encouraging. Writing fiction is something I've put aside for a long time now. Although, I was here today to continue my IM pursuits, and probably don't need any more distractions... but still encouraging!
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  • Profile picture of the author Stuart S
    You could also try introducing the first part of the series for $0.99 for an indefinite period of time and having each sequel priced at $2.99.

    While I admire your dreams to wanting to be picked up by a major publisher, if that's basically for monetary purposes you could be making just as much, if not more (and more easily) self-publishing on Kindle.

    here's a pretty good blog which I've really enjoyed reading on self-publishing and kindle.

    A Newbie's Guide to Publishing
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    • Profile picture of the author paulie888
      Originally Posted by JacksonRiddle View Post

      You could also try introducing the first part of the series for $0.99 for an indefinite period of time and having each sequel priced at $2.99.

      While I admire your dreams to wanting to be picked up by a major publisher, if that's basically for monetary purposes you could be making just as much, if not more (and more easily) self-publishing on Kindle.

      here's a pretty good blog which I've really enjoyed reading on self-publishing and kindle.

      A Newbie's Guide to Publishing
      Jackson, this relatively new ebook market created by Amazon is only going to grow in the coming years, especially with the tablet revolution right around the corner. As tablets become adopted by the mainstream, you'll only see ebook sales accelerate as it is an ideal and very convenient platform for consuming ebooks. Furthermore, I think the idea of good inexpensive ebooks available for less than a cup of coffee would be irresistible to the millions out there who have e-readers and tablets, and this trend is only going to explode with decent e-readers under $100 (which more or less makes it a tempting discretionary item) just around the corner.

      Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author Matt Bard
    Alan,

    I was in that section twice and just didn't see it right under my nose

    Thanks again.

    Matt
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  • Profile picture of the author Zabrina
    Wonderful... I just published my first Kindle short story. (Is it okay to link to it here, or is that excessive self-promotion? ) It took almost exactly 48 hours to go live.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Petersen
      Originally Posted by Zabrina View Post

      Wonderful... I just published my first Kindle short story. (Is it okay to link to it here, or is that excessive self-promotion? ) It took almost exactly 48 hours to go live.
      Congrats!

      IMO and it's just that... I don't think so since it's fiction. I'd love to see it. If people find it too promotional they'll zap it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Lyanna
    Is erotica actually allowed?
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    • Profile picture of the author edlewis
      Originally Posted by Lyanna View Post

      Is erotica actually allowed?
      Yes, you can publish erotica on Amazon....and Kindle.

      From the research I have done, it sells well. Some ebooks with very high sales rankings in the Kindle Store.

      Was actually just researching this for a blog post.
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      • Profile picture of the author Lyanna
        Originally Posted by edlewis View Post

        Yes, you can publish erotica on Amazon....and Kindle.

        From the research I have done, it sells well. Some ebooks with very high sales rankings in the Kindle Store.

        Was actually just researching this for a blog post.
        Thanks, I might try something.

        Originally Posted by TX_Girl777 View Post

        This is a pretty interesting thread. Learning some new information. I can't tell you how many romance novels I have bought within the last week... I currently have a slight addiction. I started writing an inspirational romance novel, but keep talking myself out of it. I certainly love writing and I really should finish it... I really should.
        Same, I am a reading addict. If only I could finish a long piece of writing, that would be great. I don't think 5 pages would sell!
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  • Profile picture of the author sarahberra
    Congrats!! I've never sold anything on Kindle, but I've have friends who have had some success with it. It seems like fantasy and fiction sell really well.
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    • Profile picture of the author Tarsha
      This is a pretty interesting thread. Learning some new information. I can't tell you how many romance novels I have bought within the last week... I currently have a slight addiction. I started writing an inspirational romance novel, but keep talking myself out of it. I certainly love writing and I really should finish it... I really should.
      Signature
      To be a poor man is hard, but to be a poor race in a land of dollars is the very bottom of hardships.
      - W.E.B. DuBois
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  • Profile picture of the author seobro
    Hi Ofthemix:

    I know one lady who sells paranormal stories on amazon. BTW, they are ghost stories aim at readers who are young. She is doing quite well - in fact, that is her main source of income.

    She wanted me to publish one of my stories, but that cost big money. Getting a person to proof read thousand of pages. Well, it is expensive.

    Kindle is awesome. It is easy to convert to it and there is a FREE conversion program. Good Luck and please tell us how you are coming on. Also, the story's name.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ryan Johnson
      SeoBro

      I don't have anything up yet, but I think you're sitting on something that you should work on.

      I would break down your thousand pager into a series of smaller, easy reads and publish the whole series. Shoot for something that entertains an audience for 3-4 hours.

      Do the .99 for the first book and 2.99 for the others.

      Just make sure the first book lights up your audience and the rest should sell once the ball gets rolling.
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  • Profile picture of the author Joshua Rigley
    Banned
    This thread couldn't have come at a better time. I'm writing a fantasy fiction series, and I was just thinking of publishing it for the kindle.

    To the op, well done.
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  • Profile picture of the author Colin Palfrey
    What is the average length for these $2.99 novelettes?
    Preferably as a word count, but even an average page count would help.

    Cheers,
    Colin Palfrey
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    • Profile picture of the author Paul Coleman
      Originally Posted by Colin Palfrey View Post

      What is the average length for these $2.99 novelettes?
      Preferably as a word count, but even an average page count would help.

      Cheers,
      Colin Palfrey
      Hi Colin,

      That's a judgment call. If the book is short, then the Kindle sample becomes tiny. That can hurt sales. Also, sometimes customers get angry if a book is short.

      I would recommend 50 pages/10,000 words for a 99 cent book. And double that for the $2.99 book. Of course, the 99 cent book is your leading edge/first in the series.

      Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author yukon
    Banned
    Just want to say thanks to everyone that posted in this thread.

    I've got a couple of ebooks I want to create, & looks like kindle might be a good deal.
    Signature
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  • Profile picture of the author LaLaLives
    I am fascinated by this entire discussion. Thanks to the OP for starting it.

    Here's an article someone on another forum passed to me about a writer who specializes in selling articles on Kindle:

    E-book Endeavors » Blog Archive » Kate Harper on Making Money Publishing Kindle Articles
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  • Profile picture of the author Affixlabelhere
    Banned
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author drmani
      I recently bought Paul Coleman's little ebook, "7 Kindle Power Tips"
      and it is LOADED with ideas to explode Kindle ebook sales.

      Am going to try some of them over the coming 2 weeks.

      If there's ONE person I'd recommend you follow and learn about the
      nuances of Kindle selling, it's Paul. And bookPumper.com rocks!

      All success
      Dr.Mani
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      • Profile picture of the author Mr.Wright
        Does anyone know how powerful the kindle marketplace is as opposed to the appstore
        when it comes to buyers?
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      • Profile picture of the author Mr.Wright
        Does anyone know how powerful the kindle marketplace is as opposed to the appstore
        when it comes to buyers?

        -JW
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        • Profile picture of the author Paul Coleman
          Originally Posted by Mr.Wright View Post

          Does anyone know how powerful the kindle marketplace is as opposed to the appstore
          when it comes to buyers?

          -JW
          Very powerful. Amazon has many high quality, faithful customers. One Kindle author, Amanda Hocking, sold 450,000 Kindle books in a single month. At her pricing, that's about $800,000 bucks.

          Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author Ghoster
    I got $15 worth of sales on a sci-fi novella without trying. I wish I had promoted it more back in the day but I didn't. I'm getting back into it now though. The key is networking, networking, networking. It's all about the soft-sell. You have to put yourself in a position to be recommended by people.

    I'm going to go follow my advice....
    Signature

    On the whole, you get what you pay for.

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  • Profile picture of the author goindeep
    Originally Posted by Ofthemix View Post

    So, I've been reading some threads about publishing on the Kindle lately, and aside from people like Amanda Hocking and famous fiction writers, I keep hearing that it's hard to sell fiction on the Kindle. Well, I published a short 30 page fiction novelette a few days ago and it's already sold a few copies.

    Is anyone else out there having luck selling fiction literature on the Kindle, and I'm not talking about erotica.
    I have researched kindle as a monetization model extensively and the money is simply not there for most people. Like with anything really...

    Amazon kindle is like the rain drop effect, Amazon captures a percentage of all the drops creating a big lake, so in effect even if you fail and only ever sell two books, Amazon is still laughing.

    The reality is that most people only ever sell between double and triple digits.

    Not worth the time unless you are a one of a kind author or have some totally bad ass marketing behind you.

    I'd suggest people are better off writing a blog and if you can get some regular readership to your blog, then go for kindle.

    The last thing you want to do is jump into kindle, burn countless hours, days and weeks stuck in front of a computer screen only to make a hundred bucks on kindle which is the reality for most authors.

    Remember that the author lifestyle is very taxing on people.

    The big numbers and the rags to riches stories always capture peoples attention and motivate them to write. The reality is far different from the truth.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Good luck to you and your book.

    p.s. here is a great realistic article that breaks the real figures down: http://www.theguardian.com/books/201...uthor-earnings
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