Don't Complain If You Buy Based on These Recommendations

29 replies
Hi Warriors!

I've been seeing a lot of people promoting as an affiliate with the WORST tactics and then people buy and get annoyed that the affiliate is promoting a trash product. Here's what I've seen happening:

Friend Promotions

These marketers are flat out telling you they are only promoting the products to get a reciprocal promotion from a good friend. They're admitting they haven't even seen the products but they're friends with the other marketer and were promised a JV mailing.

Yet you buy...knowing it's a back scratching situation.

The "I Glanced" Review

This marketer tells you specifically that he heard about a product the night before it went live, he scrolled quickly down the sales page and it "looked good" and so he decided to promote. He never lies and says he used it, implemented it, heck he doesn't even KNOW the original marketer - he's just thinking it sounds like the shizzle.

And yet you buy...and later complain that this marketer promotes trash.

Who Should You Buy From?

I have the utmost respect for affiliates who at LEAST read through or watch the product in its entirety. This is the bare MINIMUM you should be listening to.

The best bet is the marketer who uses it, shows you his progress or results, and then makes a REAL recommendation on whether or not you should use it.

Even Messy Situations Sometimes Turn Out Worthy

You know how we've always been taught to add at least 1 negative thing into your review? So the affiliate will write, "I have a BIG complaint about this product - I want MORE!" (sigh).

Well sometimes a product isn't PERFECT. There are obstacles. There are things that don't work right. But OVERALL....the investment is a good one.

If someone is honest with me that something truly sucked or annoyed them, but in the end it worked!? I'm a buyer - and grateful to that affiliate for showing me the things I might run into ahead of time.

This isn't a lesson just for buyers - it's a lesson for affiliates, too. I have never seen a decrease in sales as an affiliate from being blunt and honest. In fact, just the opposite - with a very low refund rate.

Tiff
#based #buy #complain #don’t #recommendations
  • Profile picture of the author Ruth P
    I totally agree Tiffany. I can't promote or review products I haven't personally read and and used, even if people I trust may have recommended it and it most likely is a good product. All of my really honest reviews - the ones that prove I use the product - are by far my most successful ones!

    Of course when it comes to promoting physical products, for example, it is possible to put together comparison websites and bring in customer reviews (i.e. from Amazon) without personally using the products yourself.

    ~Ruth
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  • Profile picture of the author Leslie B
    Hi Tiffany,

    I agree for the most part, although I do promote for friends to my list too, and I do say that to my subscribers. I test the product myself though, and I'm not doing it so they promote my products, but because I really do think the product is good. It's not always completely black and white.

    Leslie
    Signature
    Taking it one day at a time!
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  • Profile picture of the author Leslie B
    I can't NOT test it. I can't write an interesting mail about something if I don't know what it's about LOL

    Leslie
    Signature
    Taking it one day at a time!
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  • Profile picture of the author Ruth P
    Leslie - I think that kind of promotion is fine. As long as you're testing it and know what it does first hand then I don't think it falls into the kind of promotion mentioned above. Plus I guess we're more likely to promote our friends simply because we're more likely to hear about our friends' products straight away! But when it's a case of blindly promoting things because of some agreement to promote each other and nothing else with no real reviewing, I think it can get dodgy.
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    • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
      My approach to promoting affiliate offers is to give priority
      to the following only:

      #1 = Products and Services I'm Currently Using in
      My Business


      For example, I'm currently using Rapid Action Profits
      for most of my businesses so I'll happily recommend
      it and give a balanced review.

      #2 = Products and Services I've Use in My Business
      in the Past


      For example, I used to use AWeber for my autoresponder
      service but have now moved onto other solutions. I
      still believe that AWeber is a great solution for many
      people and give a full review on the pros and cons.

      #3 = Products and Services That I've Personally
      Reviewed


      There are times when there's a product or service
      that I don't need or use in my own business.

      For example, I no longer need infoproducts on how
      to put up a squeeze page - as I already know how
      to do that.

      However before I put my recommendation - name
      and reputation - behind an offer I don't need myself
      - I do my due diligence to make sure it's a good solution
      for my subscribers first.

      I will NEVER do a reciprocal mailing that's based
      entirely on a 'you scratch my back and I'll scratch
      yours' arrangement. If the product or service doesn't
      offer real value to my subscribers then I won't promote
      it... period.

      I also won't promote something if I don't agree with
      the marketing tactics being used, e.g. excess hype,
      blind offers, etc.

      When you make an affiliate recommendation, your
      reputation is on the line - every time.

      And a good reputation takes years to build and only
      minutes to burn.

      Choose wisely and do your best to never give your
      subscribers a bum steer. If a recommendation does
      go 'tits up' then take responsibility and do the best
      to rectify the situation and re-build your reputation.

      That's my approach anyways.

      Dedicated to mutual succes,

      Shaun
      Signature

      .

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      • Profile picture of the author SoundsGood
        Originally Posted by Shaun OReilly View Post

        I used to use AWeber for my autoresponder service but have now moved onto other solutions.
        Shaun, who do you use now? -- and why?

        Thanks.
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  • Profile picture of the author KristofferIM
    I can't believe how many people are promoting stuff they never even looked out. It's really bad for business because you won't become anyone's trusted adviser like that and sooner or later your peeps will hit that unsubscribe link.

    I only promote products I have used and liked. Whenever I can I also create a killer bonus for the product in question.
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    • Profile picture of the author James Clark
      Tiffany,

      Those marketers are making less and less every week! If you want some respect you have to know what is in a product that you recommend. I would never recommend something to someone that I have not seen or used in my business.

      Even if you have 100% recall it still may not work. Its one thing to find a tactics or strategy that may work for me , but to help someone do it is a different ball game.

      The skills are separate.
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      • Profile picture of the author Dave Rodman
        Banned
        Eh, I'd much rather get a review from someone in the WF than someone sending me an email promoting it.

        In most cases, the product was given to you for free to review. If a friend buys you lunch, do you really think you're going to be all that critical of the food? And i"m not even talking about not wanting to be rude or a lack of integrity. I'm more talking that when you don't shell out hard-earned cash, you likely aren't as tough on the product.

        But the BIGGEST reason is that the review is meaningless if the reviewer hasn't had a problem, searched out a solution, and determined THIS product was the best to use.

        Example:

        Let's say someone comes up to you and wants you to promote a product that allows you to manage all your WP blogs from one location. You don't really have a need for a product like that, but you have a couple WP blogs, so you try it out. It works as specified, so you send out an email.

        Now, if you had 10 blogs and you were pulling your hair out to manage all of them and post to all of them, you'd have a much different mindset when reviewing. You'd be able to say "Hey, i tried out this product. And YES, you can manage all the blogs from one location. But it doesn't allow you to mass upload posts like XYZ product".

        So there is something to be said for actually experiencing the frustration of the problem and actively searching out solutions. Which is why WF recommendations FAR EXCEED any recommendations based off review copies...even if they ARE actually reviewed.
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        • Profile picture of the author TiffanyLambert
          Originally Posted by Dave Rodman View Post

          Eh, I'd much rather get a review from someone in the WF than someone sending me an email promoting it.

          In most cases, the product was given to you for free to review. If a friend buys you lunch, do you really think you're going to be all that critical of the food? And i"m not even talking about not wanting to be rude or a lack of integrity. I'm more talking that when you don't shell out hard-earned cash, you likely aren't as tough on the product.
          I guess it depends on the person. I have people all the time asking me to promote and sometimes they give me the review copy. I reply, "I don't mind reading through it/watching it to see if it's a good fit but if I do a review, I have to implement it and show what I love and hate. And I want you to know upfront I'm blunt. So if you don't want to go there, let me know now." And I usually have confident people but a few have backed out.

          I guess I'm like that with my friends too. If they say, "Do these jeans make my butt look fat?" I'm gonna say, "Bigger than Texas" if it's the truth.

          Originally Posted by Dave Rodman View Post

          But the BIGGEST reason is that the review is meaningless if the reviewer hasn't had a problem, searched out a solution, and determined THIS product was the best to use.

          Example:

          Let's say someone comes up to you and wants you to promote a product that allows you to manage all your WP blogs from one location. You don't really have a need for a product like that, but you have a couple WP blogs, so you try it out. It works as specified, so you send out an email.

          Now, if you had 10 blogs and you were pulling your hair out to manage all of them and post to all of them, you'd have a much different mindset when reviewing. You'd be able to say "Hey, i tried out this product. And YES, you can manage all the blogs from one location. But it doesn't allow you to mass upload posts like XYZ product".

          So there is something to be said for actually experiencing the frustration of the problem and actively searching out solutions. Which is why WF recommendations FAR EXCEED any recommendations based off review copies...even if they ARE actually reviewed.
          Totally agree on having had the problem. I do go by that too. If it's not anything I've experienced a need for, then my list probably hasn't either. But although I love it here, I don't trust WF reviews MORE than an email. Nor any less. I know of many instances where friends review each others' products here as a back scratching issue - and also many marketers who send their lists here to beef up the review.

          Best thing for me is to whittle my TRUST list down to those who I know haven't ever screwed anybody and learn from them. It's a short list, but it's golden.
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          • Profile picture of the author Dave Rodman
            Banned
            Originally Posted by TiffanyDow View Post

            I guess it depends on the person. I have people all the time asking me to promote and sometimes they give me the review copy. I reply, "I don't mind reading through it/watching it to see if it's a good fit but if I do a review, I have to implement it and show what I love and hate. And I want you to know upfront I'm blunt. So if you don't want to go there, let me know now." And I usually have confident people but a few have backed out.

            I guess I'm like that with my friends too. If they say, "Do these jeans make my butt look fat?" I'm gonna say, "Bigger than Texas" if it's the truth.
            Easier said than done. Not to bring up the past, but you blasted the rich jerk for his products, he reached out to you personally, you tried his products, and became an affiliate.

            I'm not saying that was wrong, but it's an example of how people can be swayed by the product owner. Sure, you might think the product is good. But your original criticism was about his past tactics, not as much about the current product. He was able to get you to publicly apologize, TRY out his product, and then review and become an affiliate for it. If he was a nobody, I doubt you would've spent the time to do that.


            Totally agree on having had the problem. I do go by that too. If it's not anything I've experienced a need for, then my list probably hasn't either. But although I love it here, I don't trust WF reviews MORE than an email. Nor any less. I know of many instances where friends review each others' products here as a back scratching issue - and also many marketers who send their lists here to beef up the review.

            Best thing for me is to whittle my TRUST list down to those who I know haven't ever screwed anybody and learn from them. It's a short list, but it's golden.
            No, I think you misunderstood my post. It's not just something you "experienced a need for". It's something that you experienced such a need for that it made you seek out a solution. If you don't experience that need that makes you take action, it's not that big of a problem. And when it's not that big of a problem, it means you aren't looking at the product from all angles.
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        • Profile picture of the author Ken Leatherman
          Originally Posted by Dave Rodman View Post

          But the BIGGEST reason is that the review is meaningless if the reviewer hasn't had a problem, searched out a solution, and determined THIS product was the best to use.

          So there is something to be said for actually experiencing the frustration of the problem and actively searching out solutions. Which is why WF recommendations FAR EXCEED any recommendations based off review copies...even if they ARE actually reviewed.
          Tiffany, Leslie, Ruth and others have very valid points and I agree.

          Dave, I have to disagree partially with you as you have used a very broad paint brush to paint all reviews meaningless, unless a problem is found. And with some products (physical or otherwise) there isn't going to be a problem, if you have followed the directions of use. But a lot of times user error can be the cause of the problem.

          In my opinion an honest review can be given without pointing out any problem or checking to see if there is another solution that works better. Especially if the product has done what it said it would do and I found it so. When I know it works for me in most cases I will qualify the review, with "You may not get the same results I did" or "It is important to follow the step by step directions laid out for you." or something very similar.

          I have also been known to tell my list, "Hey, I haven't used this method/tool myself but I know you may find it useful. Please check it out carefully and don't buy it unless you think you can use it." (Especially when it is something very targeted that my list can use in their endeavors.)

          Many circumstances can apply to a review. Whether they are on the WF or one sent to me.

          We do have a responsibility to our self and our clients and we only do a disservice both of us when we recommend any kind of shoddy product.

          Ken Leatherman

          The Old Geezer
          Signature

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          • Profile picture of the author Dave Rodman
            Banned
            Originally Posted by Ken Leatherman View Post

            Dave, I have to disagree partially with you as you have used a very broad paint brush to paint all reviews meaningless, unless a problem is found. And with some products (physical or otherwise) there isn't going to be a problem, if you have followed the directions of use. But a lot of times user error can be the cause of the problem.
            r
            I didn't say ALL reviews through email are bad. Some marketers just use a cool product that they recently discovered and send an email about it. That's awesome in my view. THAT'S how reviews SHOULD happen.

            "Reviews" that come in around a launch schedule are meaningless in my view. Because the owner didn't actively seek them out to solve his/her own problem.

            It's like someone who comes up to you and says "Hey, I have this soap that's great for dry skin. Would you care to try it out and let me know what you think?".

            Versus the guy that has had really dry skin, tried a bunch of solutions, found the BEST that worked for him, and then recommended the best solution to his friends.
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            • Profile picture of the author TiffanyLambert
              Originally Posted by Dave Rodman View Post

              Easier said than done. Not to bring up the past, but you blasted the rich jerk for his products, he reached out to you personally, you tried his products, and became an affiliate.

              I'm not saying that was wrong, but it's an example of how people can be swayed by the product owner. Sure, you might think the product is good. But your original criticism was about his past tactics, not as much about the current product. He was able to get you to publicly apologize, TRY out his product, and then review and become an affiliate for it. If he was a nobody, I doubt you would've spent the time to do that.
              No you don't know me very well. I'm not impressed by gurus just because. I like nobodies if the product works. And I promote for them.

              The only reason I decided to implement and then promote if it worked Kelly's product is because I had publicly slammed him for what I viewed as another tactic - "coming clean" - so BECAUSE I had done that, I felt the only right thing to do was not speak out of my ass, but see if I was right - was his stuff really good or just another schtick. Turned out good so I ate crow.

              Originally Posted by Dave Rodman View Post

              No, I think you misunderstood my post. It's not just something you "experienced a need for". It's something that you experienced such a need for that it made you seek out a solution. If you don't experience that need that makes you take action, it's not that big of a problem. And when it's not that big of a problem, it means you aren't looking at the product from all angles.
              Well that's a difference between you and I - nothing wrong with that. I'm often too lazy to go seek out a good solution - OR, I've tried and given up, so when one comes along, I am eager to try it - even if THEY approach ME.

              This recently happened with James B Allen in here - he and Kevin Riley have an Amazon book course. I have tried at least 3 times to do it to no avail - courses I took SUCKED. So when HE approached ME, I accepted the chance to review but also told him I wouldn't hold back. If he was confident, I'd go ahead and if he wasn't, I wouldn't review.
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              • Profile picture of the author Dave Rodman
                Banned
                Originally Posted by TiffanyDow View Post

                No you don't know me very well. I'm not impressed by gurus just because. I like nobodies if the product works. And I promote for them.

                The only reason I decided to implement and then promote if it worked Kelly's product is because I had publicly slammed him for what I viewed as another tactic - "coming clean" - so BECAUSE I had done that, I felt the only right thing to do was not speak out of my ass, but see if I was right - was his stuff really good or just another schtick. Turned out good so I ate crow.
                That's not the point. You weren't slamming his PRODUCT were you? You slammed the way he did business right? Did his past business tactics become acceptable because he put out a good course?

                If all that had been done and you didn't start promoting the course via your affiliate link, then I would've thought intentions were pure. But look at it from an outsiders perspective. You bash product, Guru reaches out to you for damage control, you turn bashing into case study, and then start promoting the product.

                Like I said, that's a personal choice. It's not necessarily bad. But it's the flaw with the "launch style" affiliate campaigns.
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                • Profile picture of the author TiffanyLambert
                  Originally Posted by Dave Rodman View Post

                  That's not the point. You weren't slamming his PRODUCT were you? You slammed the way he did business right? Did his past business tactics become acceptable because he put out a good course?

                  If all that had been done and you didn't start promoting the course via your affiliate link, then I would've thought intentions were pure. But look at it from an outsiders perspective. You bash product, Guru reaches out to you for damage control, you turn bashing into case study, and then start promoting the product.

                  Like I said, that's a personal choice. It's not necessarily bad. But it's the flaw with the "launch style" affiliate campaigns.
                  I was specifically slamming the concept about the new course - because it was all about having turned over a new leaf, and it was about his blog post. So yes,it was relevant to the product.

                  I personally wasn't impressed with Rich Jerk myself. But BTF I am.

                  And I have bashed many people and never promoted just because they reached out. LOL!

                  Guess it all depends on how well you know the marketer - and that's why it's important to build real relationships with those on your list, which I do.

                  Agree - re: personal choice.
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  • Profile picture of the author darrin_kuykendall
    Shouldn't this be:
    Product Owners Shouldn't Complain When They Get High Volume of Refunds"
    because of those issues?

    Sometimes, the issue isn't with the buyer, it's with the seller.
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  • Profile picture of the author ankur sharma
    You nailed it Tiffany. Its the honesty which is required from any reviewer.
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  • Profile picture of the author The Institute
    Hi Tiffany--long time no see/talk/post!! It's Sandra from The Institute. So glad to be back on WF. HUGS
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  • Profile picture of the author kellyburdes
    How do you actually find time to review and look at all of the products that come your way?

    I agree that it would be the ideal way to promote a product, but I can't imagine having the time to actually look at them all.

    I'm not in IM, but the market I'm in relies heavily on JV/affiliate promotions, probably more so vs any other market aside from IM.

    I have a business to run, a family to spend time with and outside hobbies on top of that. So my method is that if you have promoted me, and I know you and trust you, I'll promote you provided that your product launch fits into my schedule.

    People in the market know that if you screw me (ie put out a bad product and have the balls to ask me to run it to my list) your never going to get my help again, and I'll also do whatever I can to make sure people know your a POS.

    It has happened to me three times were I ended up promoting a bad product, and I did everything I could to make it up to my list (offered coaching webinars valued at $3000 and private access to me for a month), and never worked with that person again.

    But like I said, I just don't see how it's possible for a person to look @ everything, use it, and still have a life and run a successful business. Maybe I need to buy a Time Mgnt course

    Anyway, that's my approach.
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    • Profile picture of the author TiffanyLambert
      Originally Posted by kellyburdes View Post

      How do you actually find time to review and look at all of the products that come your way?

      I agree that it would be the ideal way to promote a product, but I can't imagine having the time to actually look at them all. ...

      But like I said, I just don't see how it's possible for a person to look @ everything, use it, and still have a life and run a successful business. Maybe I need to buy a Time Mgnt course

      Anyway, that's my approach.
      You don't promote everything then You pick a few choice items. I do mine a little each day. The review is spread out over the course of weeks or sometimes months, but I implement it and report on it as I go. That way I have time to work on all of my business, but people follow the review as I do it and often buy and implement right along with me.
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      • Profile picture of the author Mark Nolan
        Originally Posted by TiffanyDow View Post

        You don't promote everything then You pick a few choice items.
        Seriously, that is the key.

        Hi Tiff,

        How's it going? I was at P.F. Changs and I thought of you LOL ;-) because on your blog you were saying you like their food (me too).

        Your friend,

        Mark
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    • Profile picture of the author paulie888
      Originally Posted by kellyburdes View Post

      How do you actually find time to review and look at all of the products that come your way?

      I agree that it would be the ideal way to promote a product, but I can't imagine having the time to actually look at them all.

      I'm not in IM, but the market I'm in relies heavily on JV/affiliate promotions, probably more so vs any other market aside from IM.

      I have a business to run, a family to spend time with and outside hobbies on top of that. So my method is that if you have promoted me, and I know you and trust you, I'll promote you provided that your product launch fits into my schedule.

      People in the market know that if you screw me (ie put out a bad product and have the balls to ask me to run it to my list) your never going to get my help again, and I'll also do whatever I can to make sure people know your a POS.

      It has happened to me three times were I ended up promoting a bad product, and I did everything I could to make it up to my list (offered coaching webinars valued at $3000 and private access to me for a month), and never worked with that person again.

      But like I said, I just don't see how it's possible for a person to look @ everything, use it, and still have a life and run a successful business. Maybe I need to buy a Time Mgnt course

      Anyway, that's my approach.
      The short answer is that you simply can't, which is why you should start getting very skeptical about affiliates who are promoting new products very frequently - there simply aren't enough hours in the day to review these new products and accurately assess them!

      You'll just have to pick a few products to review, and then take the time to assess each one properly. Does this mean you might end up missing out on promoting at least a few great products that you overlook due to inattention to all the upcoming releases? Most probably, but you shouldn't let this discourage you. This is just the nature of the beast, and it is better to promote a few products with integrity rather than everything that comes your way.

      Paul
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  • Profile picture of the author Nigel Greaves
    Originally Posted by TiffanyDow View Post

    I have never seen a decrease in sales as an affiliate from being blunt and honest. In fact, just the opposite - with a very low refund rate.
    That's very true Tiff and it's because people don't like being sold to. They would much sooner act on a genuine recommendation, warts and all.

    People are becoming much more cynical because of all the hype in marketing and the only way to cut through that cynicism is by being honest with them. A revolutionary concept I'll grant you

    Nigel
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