More Article-Marketing Questions - For Alexa Especially

36 replies
Alexa (and Others),

I've just (re)started this article marketing stuff. But I see now, from one of your earlier posts, that I left out a crucial piece of investigation. I didn't check to see whether there were plenty of the kind of sites in this niche where my articles could be republished. Oh well.

I am curious about a couple of things, with respect to articles submitted to EZA. How long, generally (because I'm sure it varies), does it take for someone to pick up an article and publish it to his site? And what percentage of your articles on EZA get picked up and republished?

I'm just trying to get a better handle on how this all works and whether I need to make some adjustments.

Thanks,
Michael
#alexa #articlemarketing #questions
  • Profile picture of the author Doug Wakefield
    How long, generally (because I'm sure it varies), does it take for someone to pick up an article and publish it to his site?
    It varies too much to give you a definitive answer. The early struggling with finding people to take your content will become easier in time, giving you the ability to bypass EZA completely if you wanted.

    And what percentage of your articles on EZA get picked up and republished?
    I am willing to bet that she gets close to a 100% republish rate simply because she knows what her publishers want. When you add the fact that she will go out to find people for her content... my bet becomes an easy one to take.

    When you are starting you will probably be on the lower end of publishing numbers, but will improve with time. If you go out to find publishers you can make this easier as well.
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  • Profile picture of the author tpw
    The best hitter in the history of baseball batted .365, which is 1 hit for every 3 at bats.

    Professional article marketers are lucky to do as well.

    I have always told people that if they do ten good articles, they will see the results they need to see a profitable future in article marketing.

    And that assessment has worked in all but one case.

    The one-off came to me and asked me to review her articles for quality, because her results were lukewarm.

    I reviewed her articles and told her I saw no reason why she should not see success with them.

    She decided to roll the dice on ten more articles.

    On her 14th article, she made enough money to justify doing article marketing for the next five years.

    To date, she has done more than 80 articles and has no plans of stopping any time soon. With more exposure in the marketplace, more publishers want to publish her articles. She is profiting well from the process.
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    • Profile picture of the author Doug Wakefield
      I love the baseball reference (junkie myself :p), but there is another factor of baseball that is important to mention. These players may have been born with some talent for the game, they do not get that good without constant practice.

      The easiest way to improve your results is by actually doing something to get A result. The more you practice your writing the better it will get.
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      • Profile picture of the author Bozigian
        I dont want to hijack this thread, but I have learned a lot from article marketing especially from Alexa.

        But how long are you supposed to have your own articles on your site so that they can get indexed before you are able to distribute them to article directories?
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        • Profile picture of the author tpw
          Originally Posted by Bozigian View Post

          I dont want to hijack this thread, but I have learned a lot from article marketing especially from Alexa.

          But how long are you supposed to have your own articles on your site so that they can get indexed before you are able to distribute them to article directories?

          Alexa puts articles on her site first.

          Depending on how you link to those articles, the time to get it indexed could be as little as one day and as much as one month.

          Myself, I don't worry about putting content on my site first. I put original copy up on my site for the sales process, and when I distribute my articles, they rarely if ever go on my site at all.

          p.s. As soon as Alexa hears that, she will probably freak.
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          • Profile picture of the author Bozigian
            Yes, im waiting for her response as well.

            Where is she when we need her
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          • Profile picture of the author mlhearing
            Doug and Bill,

            Thanks a bunch!

            Okay, so I don't wait around for someone to pick up my articles. Do I just find some likely sites and contact the owner, saying something like this: "I have written the most wonderfullest articles you can imagine for niche X. Would you be interested in putting them on your site?" Is that the way it works?

            I can write well enough--been doing that for years (along with copy editing). I've also been writing articles for other folks for about a year. It's just that everything else . . . overwhelms me.

            Michael
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            • Profile picture of the author Doug Wakefield
              Find publishers who have grabbed related content in your niche. You can do this by a copy-paste of part of the article and noting where the copies are. If a publisher took content from EZA already, odds are they would take more.

              Mention to them that you write articles on the subject and that you noticed that they have used EZA content on the site already.

              Your best bet would be to template this response (allowing for changes to the links) so your work is easier next time around.
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              • Profile picture of the author mlhearing
                Doug,

                Thanks. Will do.

                Michael
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              • Profile picture of the author netlexis
                Originally Posted by Doug Wakefield View Post

                Find publishers who have grabbed related content in your niche. You can do this by a copy-paste of part of the article and noting where the copies are. If a publisher took content from EZA already, odds are they would take more.

                Mention to them that you write articles on the subject and that you noticed that they have used EZA content on the site already.

                Your best bet would be to template this response (allowing for changes to the links) so your work is easier next time around.
                Good idea, Doug. So good in fact, I'm going to use it.
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            • Profile picture of the author tpw
              Originally Posted by mlhearing View Post

              Okay, so I don't wait around for someone to pick up my articles. Do I just find some likely sites and contact the owner, saying something like this: "I have written the most wonderfullest articles you can imagine for niche X. Would you be interested in putting them on your site?" Is that the way it works?

              Most writers passively promote their articles, putting them only on a directory and waiting for publishers to find it.

              More successful writers generally pro-actively promote their articles by finding a publisher likely to publish it and asking them to do so.

              Only sit on your hands if you don't believe in the value of the information in your articles.
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          • Profile picture of the author Steve Faber
            Originally Posted by tpw View Post

            Alexa puts articles on her site first.

            Myself, I don't worry about putting content on my site first. I put original copy up on my site for the sales process, and when I distribute my articles, they rarely if ever go on my site at all.

            p.s. As soon as Alexa hears that, she will probably freak.
            I never re-purpose my blog content for any of the directories either. I'm probably shooting myself in the foot, but I've always wanted original content on my own site. I do try to send high quality articles to the directories though, so it's not that I wouldn't be caught dead with those articles on my own sites.
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            • Profile picture of the author mlhearing
              Thanks, all.

              Some great suggestions here, which I'll implement as soon as I can (gotta work in the garden today--before it rains again).

              One of my articles got picked up today. So . . . I reckon I'll keep at it.

              Michael
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              • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
                Banned
                Sorry, have only just seen the thread now ... Bill has mostly answered for me, of course. Apart from the bit to make me freak ... :p

                It varies so much that "averages" don't mean a lot.

                Most of mine have been syndicated before they reach EZA anyway, because of the way I contact people myself before submitting there. My answers would only really be interesting with regard to a brand new niche, I suppose. But I haven't actually started one for a while, anyway. And even then, I'd be answering with metaphors and analogies from backgammon and shoe-shopping instead of baseball and harmonica bands, as Bill does. :p

                By the time I've had a niche up and running for a long time, there aren't so many people left who would be valued syndicators for me who are likely to syndicate it from EZA anyway (because I've already offered it to the "key ones"). So, in that sense, the fewer the people who syndicate an article from EZA, the more money it might bring me. Paradoxically enough (though not really)! But of course, always hit-and-miss, exactly as Bill says (which was why, when I was writing for other people, a couple of years ago, I was very reluctant to do fewer than 4 - 5 articles for a new client, because you could do 1 or 2 and not "prove the point" at all, whereas with about 5, you'd hope to "get somewhere", just statistically).
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                • Profile picture of the author Steve Faber
                  Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

                  Sorry, have only just seen the thread now ... Bill has mostly answered for me, of course. Apart from the bit to make me freak ... :p

                  It varies so much that "averages" don't mean a lot.

                  Most of mine have been syndicated before they reach EZA anyway, because of the way I contact people myself before submitting there. My answers would only really be interesting with regard to a brand new niche, I suppose. But I haven't actually started one for a while, anyway. And even then, I'd be answering with metaphors and analogies from backgammon and shoe-shopping instead of baseball and harmonica bands, as Bill does. :p

                  By the time I've had a niche up and running for a long time, there aren't so many people left who would be valued syndicators for me who are likely to syndicate it from EZA anyway (because I've already offered it to the "key ones"). So, in that sense, the fewer the people who syndicate an article from EZA, the more money it might bring me. Paradoxically enough (though not really)! But of course, always hit-and-miss, exactly as Bill says (which was why, when I was writing for other people, a couple of years ago, I was very reluctant to do fewer than 4 - 5 articles for a new client, because you could do 1 or 2 and not "prove the point" at all, whereas with about 5, you'd hope to "get somewhere", just statistically).
                  Alexa, thanks for bringing me back. About 6 years ago I used to do this, and am actually still getting traffic from it, although I knew very little about how to write a resource box, bio, or any such nonsense. Somehow, I got away from it, and started using article directories instead. I have been doing guest posts for a while now, and they're great, of course if you choose your blogs correctly. I have to go back and do some targeted article marketing for some of the more popular e-zines in my niches, in addition to the guest blog posting.
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          • Profile picture of the author NateRivers
            Originally Posted by tpw View Post


            p.s. As soon as Alexa hears that, she will probably freak.
            Seriously...

            She knows what she's talking about though. I've posted false advice before(unknowingly) and swiftly got corrected.
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          • Profile picture of the author Diane S
            Originally Posted by tpw View Post

            Myself, I don't worry about putting content on my site first. I put original copy up on my site for the sales process, and when I distribute my articles, they rarely if ever go on my site at all.
            I put my articles at my own site first. They are there for the bots. I don't bring them to the attention of my customers. They have to really hunt to find my articles. But the search engine bots have no trouble finding them. So my sales page stays in front of my potential customers and the search engines believe I have an authority site in the niche.
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        • Profile picture of the author KatyaSenina
          Originally Posted by Bozigian View Post

          I dont want to hijack this thread, but I have learned a lot from article marketing especially from Alexa.

          But how long are you supposed to have your own articles on your site so that they can get indexed before you are able to distribute them to article directories?
          Hi Bozigian, you can ping your posts (at Pingler, Pingoat, Pingomatic etc) and bookmark your posts (socialbookmarker.com) or submit them to RSS feed aggregators... just google some of them. This will help your posts get indexed faster.

          ps. You can PM Alexa, but she is probably a very busy girl
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    • Profile picture of the author KatyaSenina
      Originally Posted by tpw View Post

      I have always told people that if they do ten good articles, they will see the results they need to see a profitable future in article marketing.

      And that assessment has worked in all but one case.

      The one-off came to me and asked me to review her articles for quality, because her results were lukewarm.

      I reviewed her articles and told her I saw no reason why she should not see success with them.

      She decided to roll the dice on ten more articles.

      On her 14th article, she made enough money to justify doing article marketing for the next five years.
      tpw, what would you consider good articles? I really put effort in mine, but what makes for a great article, one worth sharing/re-publishing? How should I construct them?

      Do you have examples of great articles?

      ps. Care to share who this girl is you're talking about (would appreciate it if I can check her articles out and learn from them - just send me a PM if you want)
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      • Profile picture of the author bretski
        Good thread and a lot of good advice. I like Bill's (tpw) point. Not all your articles are going to be gold and I've had articles that I thought were great do nothing... a few views, maybe a click or two and nobody picked them up. I've also had articles that I wrote top to bottom in a sleep deprived coma while zooming on too much coffee that took off, got lots of exposure both on directories, on my site and also were picked up by other sites for some strange reason.

        "There's just no accounting for some people's taste... and it won't mean a thing in a hundred years..."
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      • Profile picture of the author tpw
        Originally Posted by KatyaSenina View Post

        tpw, what would you consider good articles? I really put effort in mine, but what makes for a great article, one worth sharing/re-publishing? How should I construct them?

        Do you have examples of great articles?

        ps. Care to share who this girl is you're talking about (would appreciate it if I can check her articles out and learn from them - just send me a PM if you want)

        You know a good article when you see one. When you have reached the end of a good article, you already know who you want to share it with, and you usually do share it.

        A good article is generally one that shares information that its target audience wants to know.

        But it is not just good information, it is also an article that creates trust in the writer, because the reader feels confident in what the writer has written.

        When the reader is finished reading the article and feels that he or she took something valuable from the article, that is a good article.

        When the reader reaches the end of the article and is happy to have read the article, perfect.

        When the reader reaches the end of the article and feels compelled to learn who the author is, that is a good and effective article.

        When you read an article and you are happy to have read that article, sit down to study it and try to understand why you liked it.

        When you share an article, take a moment to understand what in the article you felt was worthy of the share.

        Trust your own instincts.

        You are your own best teacher, if you will take the time to recognize why you do what you do and why you feel as you do at the end of the article.
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      • Profile picture of the author aandersen
        Originally Posted by KatyaSenina View Post

        tpw, what would you consider good articles? . . . Do you have examples of great articles?
        I guess Bill is feeling humble today...

        His article directory is full of good article. See for yourself...

        200 Most Recent Articles at: thePhantomWriters.com
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      • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
        Originally Posted by KatyaSenina View Post

        tpw, what would you consider good articles? I really put effort in mine, but what makes for a great article, one worth sharing/re-publishing? How should I construct them?

        Do you have examples of great articles?

        ps. Care to share who this girl is you're talking about (would appreciate it if I can check her articles out and learn from them - just send me a PM if you want)

        Katya,

        In addition to Alexa's and Bill's many brilliant WarriorForum posts on the subject of writing super high-quality articles for syndication, I can honestly say that two of the most enlightening and motivating things I've read are:

        (1) Article Marketing - Beyond the basics, by Bill Platt (tpw) himself. (FREE download); and

        (2) Super Performing Articles, by Randy Ingermanson (not quite free, but may as well be at a mere $7).

        Definitely download the first, if you haven't read it before. And if you can spare the $7 at all for the latter, then I'd honestly not even waste a moment mulling it over - it's just a no-brainer.

        Good luck!
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        • Profile picture of the author mlhearing
          Alexa and Bill and All the Rest,

          Thanks a bunch for these helpful posts. My head is starting to hurt a bit, though, because I'm having to think.

          Alexa, what are the criteria you use to judge a site worth considering for syndication? Just how do you decide whether or not to approach the owner about taking your articles?

          Bill, you say that we know a good article when we see it. Just so. But I am still wondering . . . How much would you say an article's being stylistically "good" figures in to the goodness equation? Usually, I find that I'm long on stylistic cleverness (because it impresses me) and opinion and short on facts. And I know facts alone aren't enough because if that were the case, we could just write a bald list. Any advice?

          I really appreciate everyone's contributions here.

          Michael
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          • Profile picture of the author Kay King
            You are beginning to overthink the process. If you start marketing in a new niche and want to use articles for promotion, you can find ranked sites and blog in that niche and offer to provide a unique article to them. Bloggers especially are looking for content all the time and may be happy to accommodate you.

            Many of my syndicated articles were taken directly from EZA and placed on other sites with the resource box intact. I've seen little of the "publishing without giving credit" in niches I'm in and think that occurs most often in niches related to IM activities and make-money sites.

            As for EZA - right now it's a tossup as to how long it takes to get approved or whether an article in a certain will be acceptable. Until the changes made last week settle in and EZA is "business as usual" we're all just feeling our way.

            kay
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            • Profile picture of the author myob
              There are fundamental basics that ALL articles must have, besides engaging the reader. The gold standard for article writing I use and require for all my writers is "The Associated Press Stylebook". We syndicate both online and offline publications, and this guide is a road map to clean and concise writing, which opens many doors of opportunity. The intersection of the basics such as grammar, spelling, facts, terminology, etc with personality and engagement are the ultimate culmination of elements of style which mark the writer as a true professional.
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          • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
            Banned
            Originally Posted by mlhearing View Post

            Alexa, what are the criteria you use to judge a site worth considering for syndication?
            Well, almost anything "context-relevant" is worth trying, really.

            Good signs are if it just looks like a "good site" (I want their traffic if their articles/content are literate, and so on, because those are potential customers I can convert), or if they have a bit of page-rank, if they don't have too many backlinks on their site (I don't want a backlink on a page with 40 others, it's not worth bothering for that, because the link-juice is already divided too thinly), or if they've syndicated other content before (in which they'll probably say yes) ... but I don't exactly over-analyze it, to be honest.

            Originally Posted by mlhearing View Post

            Just how do you decide whether or not to approach the owner about taking your articles?
            I just err on the side of doing so, unless it looks awful. There's no downside, really. The time-consuming part is finding them. Once you've found them, it only takes another few seconds to send out a pre-written email to them.
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          • Profile picture of the author tpw
            Originally Posted by mlhearing View Post

            Bill, you say that we know a good article when we see it. Just so. But I am still wondering . . . How much would you say an article's being stylistically "good" figures in to the goodness equation? Usually, I find that I'm long on stylistic cleverness (because it impresses me) and opinion and short on facts. And I know facts alone aren't enough because if that were the case, we could just write a bald list. Any advice?

            I hired a writer one time who was very fond of his "stylistic cleverness" (because it impressed him as to his cleverness).

            I fired him after only three weeks on the job, because he would not stop doing that.

            If your style gets in the way of the goal of the article, which is to attract readers, drive traffic your website, and to put people into a mindset to consider buying what you are selling, then your article will be a failure.



            I rarely follow "The Associated Press Stylebook" guidelines... And maybe it hurts me to do so...

            I tend to write in a more conversational style. Much in the same way that I write my WF posts.

            This morning, I was watching my reruns of Pitchmen with Anthony Sullivan. Something he said really stood out in my mind...

            In the "Stadium Back" episode, he was advising the inventor on how to be a better pitchman for his product.

            He said that when he was writing the scripts for his commercials, he was doing it in such a way that he would, in essence, be having a conversation with one person in his audience. He said that allows him to touch the viewer in a more personal way...

            And that is what I try to do with my articles...

            Just as I am sitting here typing, I am basically having a conversation with you.

            I am communicating my message to one person in the audience specifically, although dozens or hundreds of people may be reading my words and absorbing the message that I am delivering.

            And likely, you can sense that I am having a conversation with "one person" in the audience.

            Yet, the fact that I seem to be having a conversation with one person in the audience does not diminish for everyone else, the message I am sharing...

            All of you realize that I am talking directly to Michael, answering his specific question...

            But is it possible that if I left off Michael's question at the beginning of this post, do you sense that I could potentially be talking directly to you instead?

            This is exactly why I prefer the conversational style in my writing...

            If I can make you think... If I can teach you something that you want to know... If I can make you smile or laugh... If I can make you feel as if I am standing directly in front of you, answering your questions for you in a way that you are satisfied with my answer, then my writing will be much more effective in leading you to take the action I want you to take...

            And if I can lead you through the process, from opening my article, to reading it to its conclusion, to clicking the link in my resource box and doing what I told you to do in my resource box, then I stand a real good chance of getting you to happily send me money, at some point in the present or future...

            Style does matter...

            But don't let it get in the way of accomplishing your real goal --- leading people to buy what you are selling....
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            • Profile picture of the author aandersen
              Originally Posted by tpw View Post

              This is exactly why I prefer the conversational style in my writing...

              If I can make you think... If I can teach you something that you want to know... If I can make you smile or laugh... If I can make you feel as if I am standing directly in front of you, answering your questions for you in a way that you are satisfied with my answer, then my writing will be much more effective in leading you to take the action I want you to take...

              And if I can lead you through the process, from opening my article, to reading it to its conclusion, to clicking the link in my resource box and doing what I told you to do in my resource box, then I stand a real good chance of getting you to happily send me money, at some point in the present or future...

              Style does matter...

              But don't let it get in the way of accomplishing your real goal --- leading people to buy what you are selling....
              QFT, because pressing the thanks button just wasn't enough...
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              • Profile picture of the author tpw
                Originally Posted by aandersen View Post

                QFT, because pressing the thanks button just wasn't enough...

                Haha... I have been out of Thanks buttons for several hours now...

                Let us do a Harmonica concerto...



                p.s. If the Harmonica reference is beyond you, ask Paul Myers what I am talking about.
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                • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
                  One more quick thing on the subject of finding places to syndicate your articles.

                  One of the things that can lead me to inquire is if I come across a site I'd love to see my content on. If the site impresses me, it probably also impresses others.

                  I said one, so call this a bonus...

                  Some of the most lucrative syndication opportunities are not on the web at all. Having your article used in an email series, in an ezine sent by email, or even in the print world can lead to greater returns than you might expect. Just because you won't get a link and some SE juice doesn't mean you should pass a good opportunity by...
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                • Profile picture of the author mlhearing
                  Bill,

                  Thanks--that's pretty much what I thought. In fact, that's almost exactly what I used to tell my Freshman Comp students. (I went to college in your town.)

                  Trouble is . . . I often find myself doing the very things I told my students not to. It seems that when I run low on real info, I fall back on the show-off stuff.

                  What I'm really struggling with is hitting just the right balance between merely informing and selling. I seem to swing back and forth between brazen salesmanship and bland fact-giving.

                  I do have your article guide. I'll re-read it tonight.

                  Michael
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                  • Profile picture of the author tpw
                    Originally Posted by mlhearing View Post

                    What I'm really struggling with is hitting just the right balance between merely informing and selling. I seem to swing back and forth between brazen salesmanship and bland fact-giving.

                    You gotta be careful with this...

                    Your article is not intended to sell products or services, but rather to sell YOU to your readers...

                    Your article should never attempt to blatantly sell your products or services.

                    Your article sells YOU...

                    Your Resource Box pre-sells your offer...

                    And your website does the actually selling of your products and services...

                    Don't fall into the comfortable trap of trying to sell your products or services in the article itself... Instead, use your article to sell your reader on YOU and to pre-qualify people to click the link in your resource box.
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  • Profile picture of the author JoeMack
    You know that you are respected Warrior when people are starting threads specifically for you.

    Nice work, Alexa. And yes, I truly respect your expertise on article marketing as well.

    JoeMack
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  • Profile picture of the author Kev Stevenson
    I started a thread recently to ask for the 'syndicators' point of view.
    i.e what is a content publisher looking for in an article?

    John Mcabe gave a great answer here - worth reading...
    -------------------
    http://www.warriorforum.com/main-int...i-ask-you.html
    --------------------
    Regards,
    K
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  • Profile picture of the author aaronngoh
    Article marketing is a number game, the more you submit, the more chance that it will get picked up

    Focus on the value you want to give in those articles and let the universe do the rest.

    It work for me that way
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