Do you sell ebooks worth $47 or even $97, $147 ??

by entry
19 replies
Many ebooks are worth $7, $27 but how many of you sell ebooks worth $47, $97, $147 ?

and are you having much luck/sales pricing them at that price?


#$147 #$47 #$97 #ebook #sell
  • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
    Originally Posted by entry View Post

    Many ebooks are worth $7, $27 but how many of you sell ebooks worth $47, $97, $147 ?

    and are you having much luck/sales pricing them at that price?
    I sell e-books in the $7 to $127 range. But here is what fascinates me about e-books (actually, any product we sell). I notice variations across different price points and niches. Also, positioning and how you pre-sale has a huge impact on how well your product (e-book) will sell / convert. This has always fascinated me because the permuations are almost endless.

    In one niche we tested the following price points (it was a 120 page e-book written in 11 point Verdana font, double spaced):

    $17.95
    $19.95
    $27
    $37
    $47
    $67
    $77

    We used approximately 100 very specific keywords using PPC (Google and Yahoo in this test) and we ran campaigns with well over 30,000 visitors and the most profitable price point during that month was the $47 price point. I'm not going to reveal the results a year later, but it's results like these that have turned me into a testing fanatic back in the day.

    When pricing an e-book over $50, I no longer call it an e-book because testing has shown me that it converts better at higher price points when it's NOT called an e-book. It's call something else. You can also convert your e-book into a membership site where people can only view it by accessing it online. It protects it a little better because you can disable access and disable the copy and paste and print options.

    For the higher priced "e-books" we deliver tremendous value (usually a year's worth of follow up using very specific autoresponder messages.

    RoD "My-Coffee-Mug-Has-Tiger-Blood!" CorteZ
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    • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
      Originally Posted by Rod Cortez View Post

      When pricing an e-book over $50, I no longer call it an e-book because testing has shown me that it converts better at higher price points when it's NOT called an e-book.
      I was writing a similar thing before I saw your post.

      I agree with you 100%.

      Dedicated to mutual success,

      Shaun
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      • Profile picture of the author entry
        Originally Posted by Rod Cortez View Post

        When pricing an e-book over $50, I no longer call it an e-book because testing has shown me that it converts better at higher price points when it's NOT called an e-book.
        Originally Posted by Shaun OReilly View Post

        The key is not to called them ebooks if you want to
        go into the $97+ bracket because the term ebook
        immediately lowers the perceived value of the
        infoproduct.

        You mean if you want to sell it at a $127 - $197, you should Scrap the term ebook and use Blueprint, or guide for example?


        or you are saying convert it into another format or somthing ?
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        • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
          Originally Posted by entry View Post

          You mean if you want to sell it at a $127 - $197, you should Scrap the term ebook and use Blueprint, or guide for example?


          or you are saying convert it into another format or somthing ?
          I actually meant either / or / both. As Shaun and I mind-melded like two Vulcans regarding the term e-book (lol), you definitely don't want to call your product an e-book, especially in those price ranges you just listed. "Blueprint" is a good, proven euphemism.

          Also changing the format can help too. One of my best-selling e-books is a 400 page PDF document. And it sold well. But it sold better when I broke up it up into 6 different phases (it was also much easier to read and digest), added more value by giving unadvertised bonuses (I'm big on mini-reports, mini-videos, and mini-audios) - you'll find that 20 - 40% of your customer base will simply LOVE these, as long as you provide value.

          The key here is to deliver VALUE, break it down so it's easier to digest, and deliver more content over a period of 30, 60, 180 or even 365 days. This is something you should definitely test. Some of my marketing tests never end. We have a current one we started in 2004 and I don't forsee it being over for another few years (like I wrote before, I'm a testing NUT job with tiger blood!).

          RoD


          Originally Posted by Shaun OReilly View Post

          I was writing a similar thing before I saw your post.

          I agree with you 100%.

          Dedicated to mutual success,

          Shaun
          Shaun,

          Great minds think alike. Well, in my case I only have coffee beans between my ears, but you catch my drift.

          RoD
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          "Your personal philosophy is the greatest determining factor in how your life works out."
          - Jim Rohn
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          • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
            Originally Posted by Rod Cortez View Post

            Shaun,

            Great minds think alike. Well, in my case I only have coffee beans between my ears, but you catch my drift.

            RoD
            He, he!

            I promise I wasn't copying your ideas :-)

            It seems we're singing from the same 'proven principles of
            effective infomarketing' hymn sheet.

            Dedicated to mutual success,

            Shaun
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        • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
          Originally Posted by entry View Post

          You mean if you want to sell it at a $127 - $197, you should Scrap the term ebook and use Blueprint, or guide for example?


          or you are saying convert it into another format or somthing ?
          Definitely don't use the word ebook for the higher-priced
          infoproducts.

          However, it's not just about changing the name. Sure, you
          can use different terms (e.g. system) but make sure that
          you deliver more value too.

          One way to do that is by changing the format (e.g. adding
          audio, video and/or membership sites, etc).

          If you want to charge more money, you need to deliver
          more value.

          Dedicated to mutual success,

          Shaun
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          .

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  • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
    The key is not to called them ebooks if you want to
    go into the $97+ bracket because the term ebook
    immediately lowers the perceived value of the
    infoproduct.

    The language you use to describe your offers is
    very important.

    So, change the format and other elements of the
    offer if you want to charge the higher prices.

    Dedicated to mutual success,

    Shaun
    Signature

    .

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  • Profile picture of the author carter3
    @entry
    You mean if you want to sell it at a $127 - $197, you should Scrap the term ebook and use Blueprint, or guide for example?


    or you are saying convert it into another format or somthing ?

    you should make it appear real and with good quality because you convincing your customer to buy your because it worth its price.
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    • Profile picture of the author AmandeepS
      I agree with Rod and Shaun. If you sell anything above $47 then I would not call it an eBook. I sell a home study course that some might think is an eBook for £147 and have no problems. Also, consider selling a physical copy for products that have more than 100 pages because you can upsell them from digital download to physical - I find a lot of people like physical copies.
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  • Profile picture of the author marcuslim
    Personally, I'd sell e-books (I prefer calling them reports) for cheap, cause they are the low-ticket items that get me into the market, and also allows me to see what's working and what's not. If a particular low-ticket report is selling really well, then I can go ahead and repurpose it and repackage it as a higher-ticket item like a video course, which can then sell for $47 or $97 as video always has a higher perceived value.
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    • Profile picture of the author entry
      Originally Posted by timyang View Post

      If a particular low-ticket report is selling really well, then.

      If it is a $9 report,

      and you know it is selling really well, can you increase the price to $14, $17, even $27.

      As the fact it is selling well means that it is doing well?
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    • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
      Originally Posted by timyang View Post

      Personally, I'd sell e-books (I prefer calling them reports) for cheap, cause they are the low-ticket items that get me into the market, and also allows me to see what's working and what's not. If a particular low-ticket report is selling really well, then I can go ahead and repurpose it and repackage it as a higher-ticket item like a video course, which can then sell for $47 or $97 as video always has a higher perceived value.
      That's definitely ONE way to do it.

      Since the OP was specifically asking about $47, $97, and $147 e-books I addressed his question as such. I didn't feel the need to bring this up but now that it's on the table, selling cheap reports is a great piece of virtually any marketing sales funnel - both before and after the sale. You bring up a great point as far as "testing" the waters, however I usually look to the competition for this.

      If I see enough competition, I know there are people making money out there. I simply study them to find out what they do well and where they suck and then I do it better. Ideally you want to have a sales funnel that starts off with free, valuable, but INCOMPLETE content. Give enough to be USEFUL, but don't give away the whole enchilada along with spicy green sauce! You can then offer an affordable report if you want; again, this is something you should test on your own.

      Sometimes we do far better when we kill it in the pre-sale without the low-cost reports and sometimes we don't. One of the ways to maximize profits is to have products at different price points. I still get people who can't believe I sell an e-book on dating for $97 that converts really well. Then I remind them that there are people out there that are paying thousands of dollars for match-making services (which very seldom teach you the social skills you need to succeed anyway, so I'm not a big fan of them).

      Think about it. People will pay thousands to find "the one". So of course they'll buy a high-priced "blue print" (a.k.a. e-book, but we won't call it that) if you have great sales copy that sucks people in and pulls on their emotional triggers.

      Good post TimYang.

      RoD
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  • Profile picture of the author Dean Jackson
    Allan has a great post on this in the War Room As I recall, "eBooks" have gained a negative "stigma" attached to it. As others suggested, using words like... - Blueprint - Guide - Report - Etc ...are much more effective. If you think about it, eBooks really do have some negative stereotypes. Just picture an old school book with no formatting... no hyperlinks, boring/dry read, doesn't butcher the english language (thick ass paragraphs, no elipses to carry on thoughts etc). They've been floating around the internet for years. Re-positioning a written product as one of the above or something similar would understandably be much better in your customers eyes. - Dean
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  • Profile picture of the author BobbyFreiler
    Hey,

    I don't sell eBooks at all. I give them away for free, and pack them with a ton of value. It's a great way to bond with your list or to even get people to opt-into your list.

    With that being said, you could be laying out a serious $147 eBook that describes how to build a six-figure business in any niche or something like that, which would be well worth the price, but that's exactly what you'd have to do. eBook's are so commoditized like digital cameras - everyone has one, and everyone is selling one, so your eBook better deliver one heck of a slam dunk in value if you're going to be selling it for those ranges of prices.

    Take care,

    Bobby Freiler
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  • Profile picture of the author Highpurpose
    I have an existing website where I sell an ebook / course for $97. It does OK, but I want to turn it into a membership site I can integrate into clickbank and paypal. However, I don't have the skills to do that all myself.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike McAleer
    I am going to be offering a higher priced WSO soon and am wondering what price to go with. I think $47.
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    • Profile picture of the author trishworks4u
      I actually have a "guide" (non-IM) that sells for $54 and has been picking up steam recently. I've been converting a few a day now. Has inspired me to do another similar "guide".
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      • Profile picture of the author Damani Tabor
        Marketing is psychological.
        Price is not an issue, once the client is focused on cost - i.e. the cost of now acquiring the information.
        To that end, they must perceive it to be so valuable that they loose without it.
        To assist in this regard, it is helpful to not call it an ebook in the higher price range.

        Additionally high value products may best be SPLIT into modules. So now you are selling a Complete Course with 6 modules, as opposed to just one 130 page ebook.
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  • Profile picture of the author Daniel Scott
    Just wanted to chime in and say Rod's one of the most amazing marketers I know. You could do a lot worse than following his advice.

    -Daniel

    P.S. I don't have tiger blood, but I did bite a goat once.
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    Always looking for badass direct-response copywriters. PM me if we don't know each other and you're looking for work.

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