Stop the exit pop-ups! Do they think we're stupid?

31 replies
I check out loads of offers.

I don't buy that many.

I've been around a while and I know that most products aren't going to teach me much new.

BUT, why does everyone with a new product on CB try and grab me when I exit with the 'OK/Cancel' popup?

And how many do you need?

If I 'OK' to leave once, DO NOT try it another five times!

I HATE them and it makes me think that they are trying to scam me into buying their product.

In fact it means that I'll never buy anything that the do, ever.

What say you?
#exit #popups #stop #stupid
  • Profile picture of the author asimbawany
    Exit Pops are a very good strategy. I don't hate them. When I come across an exit pop on a site, I know that site owner has the sense to try and capture a portion of the traffic that would have been lost to him/her.

    But like you pointed out, it gets REALLY annoying when they try to trap you and won't just let you leave a site. Its like being a pushy car sales man who's desperate to meet targets and just doesn't know when to stop. When using these, You need to know when to stop or instead of gaining visitors you lose them.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ian Clifford
    asimbawany - I agree that a SINGLE exit pop-up works and is proven to do so and I use them to capture leads when people leave a site, but the desperate multiple ones with decreasing pricepoints and alternative offers just scream IDIOT!
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  • Profile picture of the author asimbawany
    hehe... well look at it this way...
    too many exit pops means you dont have to research the product and the product owner
    They themselves tell you they're idiots
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  • Profile picture of the author dadamson
    Yeah really annoying too!

    I never use them but they say they work..
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  • Profile picture of the author ncmedia
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    • Profile picture of the author Scoop
      Originally Posted by ncmedia View Post

      EDIT: Will also add that customer bases grow with trends pretty quickly, hence trying these methods on marketers/mmo products can and does backfire like here, however - if you do this exit strategy properly outside the mmo niche you'll see your sales/saves soar (that doesn't mean have five of them OR lower the price, it means split test like you do everything else until it's peaked).
      That's a great point. I find multiple exit popups annoying because I come across them too many times, but in many niches they will be unusual. That may change over time, of course.

      I still think that while one exit popup can give a nice bonus/offer that the potential customer might welcome, two or more can seem desperate or irritating. But yes, nothing beats split testing.

      One side effect of this trend for me has been that if I want to purchase something I will try to leave the page first just to see if there is an exit popup. It's not so irritating when you get a decent discount.
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      • Profile picture of the author Ian Clifford
        NCMedia - I know tyou're right about the effectiveness but you nail it when you say that it's in the MMO world where we all know the score that it grates!
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        Ian Clifford

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        ...the ultimate resource to help you succeed in the music business...

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      • Profile picture of the author James Sides
        Personally I hate all pop ups as a consumer and because of this I resisted adding them to my sites for a LONG time.

        Unfortunately, statistics show they are too powerful to ignore so I've added them to sites that I feel can benefit.

        I just look at it like this, once that person has left my site they are never coming back anyway so I might as well do everything I can do get em today.

        Cheers!

        James
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        "People will remain the same until the pain of staying the same is greater than the pain of change."

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        • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
          Banned
          Originally Posted by Ian Clifford View Post

          Stop the exit pop-ups! Do they think we're stupid?
          No. We think they're stupid.

          The reality is that some are, and others aren't.

          It's a difficult subject.

          The problem with discussing the pro's and con's of pop-ups is that when you're dealing with pop-ups, the pro's tend to be very visible while many of the con's are typically not so readily apparent.

          The big argument against them is that many of the people who don't like them would otherwise have come back to your site in future, but decide not to, because of the pop-up.

          You lose some returning traffic, in other words.

          All too often people testing them don't allow for this, and assume they're working when they may not be, really.

          For example, someone selling a product for $37 can try out an exit pop-up offering the product for $19, attempting to "catch" some of the traffic leaving after people decided not to buy for $37. He can make some sales and imagine "This is all extra money, because these people were leaving my site". This is wrong, of course, and people who split-test reliably enough, and for long enough, to allow for the loss of returning traffic are typically the ones who abandon these exit pop-ups.

          Every client of mine who has tested them realistically and accurately has actually dropped them.

          Some people don't take into account that few customers buy at their first visit to a site, and that most of those "extra" $19 sales will really be sales to people who would otherwise have returned and paid $37. So these things can really cost you a lot of money, while you imagine that you're actually gaining from them.

          Something can increase your immediate conversion-rate yet still cost you money overall.

          Three things to bear in mind are:-

          (i) Many marketers use stuff uncritically, without testing it for themselves, because they see so many other people using it and imagine "it 'must' be working" (of course, this is part of the underlying perpetuation-process for many of the urban myths of internet marketing);

          (ii) Many marketers do inadequate and/or misleading split-testing because they're not always allowing for all the relevant factors: it's quite easy (especially over the short-term) to imagine you're gaining something when you're actually losing something (in the long run);

          (iii) There are already legal issues about pop-ups (especially exit pop-ups), and there'll be more in future, too. Our resident internet lawyer Brian Kindsvater has addressed this issue in other threads on the same subject, and I'm not a lawyer and obviously can't add to what he's said - but it would certainly dissuade me from using them, and that's even without the various other factors mentioned above.

          Originally Posted by Fenderkid View Post

          I just look at it like this, once that person has left my site they are never coming back anyway so I might as well do everything I can do get em today.
          My few clients who have tested it thoroughly don't look at it that way, because that isn't true of their sites. If it's true of yours, then I venture to suggest that you have a problem for which an exit pop-up isn't necessarily the answer. That makes sure that many are "never coming back", James.
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          • Profile picture of the author edlewis
            Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

            All too often people testing them don't allow for this, and assume they're working when they may not be, really.

            For example, someone selling a product for $37 can try out an exit pop-up offering the product for $19, attempting to "catch" some of the traffic leaving after people decided not to buy for $37. He can make some sales and imagine "This is all extra money, because these people were leaving my site". This is wrong, of course, and people who split-test reliably enough, and for long enough, to allow for the loss of returning traffic are typically the ones who abandon these exit pop-ups.

            Every client of mine who has tested them realistically and accurately has actually dropped them.

            Some people don't take into account that few customers buy at their first visit to a site, and that most of those "extra" $19 sales will really be sales to people who would otherwise have returned and paid $37. So these things can really cost you a lot of money, while you imagine that you're actually gaining from them.

            Something can increase your immediate conversion-rate yet still cost you money overall.

            I understand what you are saying here, but when it comes to these Clickbank sites...aren't you kind of missing the point?

            Many of the CB sites that have these exit popups do so because the product they are selling is nothing more than a loss-leader...(or maybe a "break-even" leader).

            The money that comes in on the front end of these products is virtually irrelevant to those selling them...the real money comes later on with back-end sales once customers are in the sales funnel.

            Specifically speaking to these CB sites, they don't really care what a customer pays to get into the sales funnel...it's just a matter of getting them in.

            They are giving 75% to the affiliate sending the traffic to them anyway...so we aren't really talking about a difference between $37 and $19...we are talking about a difference of $8 or maybe $4 after you figure in Clickbank fees.

            The vendors running these sites could care less about that $4 difference...they just want that customer in the funnel so they can promote higher ticket items to them later on. Because that is where they make their real money.

            Again...I can't speak for your clients, but that is what is going through the heads of these ClickBank guys.

            That front product is there to bring traffic and generate leads.

            Affiliates promote it for a 75% commission...that's free traffic for the vendor. Plus the vendor collects FREE leads that don't convert and can try to convert them later or convert them on another product.

            The vendor also collects buyer leads - those who actually purchase the product - and then sells those people more stuff, at higher prices/margins...relying on the 80/20 rule to play out.
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            • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
              Banned
              Originally Posted by edlewis View Post

              when it comes to these Clickbank sites...aren't you kind of missing the point?
              I don't think so? Any more than I think lawyers are kind of missing the point when they mention that many of these exit pop-ups are already illegal and that that's eventually going to get enforced.

              Originally Posted by edlewis View Post

              Many of the CB sites that have these exit popups do so because the product they are selling is nothing more than a loss-leader...(or maybe a "break-even" leader).
              I'm aware of these sites, and take your point absolutely.

              They may be the ones about which people talk a lot, but I think they're actually a very small proportion of the 14,000+ currently active products on Clickbank.

              Originally Posted by edlewis View Post

              The money that comes in on the front end of these products is virtually irrelevant to those selling them...
              Yes, indeed.

              I can well understand those few vendors selling "loss leaders" wanting to get away with using them while the laws are still not being enforced.

              Originally Posted by edlewis View Post

              Again...I can't speak for your clients, but that is what is going through the heads of these ClickBank guys.
              My clients (who tested) were also "Clickbank guys" but were among the overwhelming majority aiming to make a profit from what they were selling.

              Of course you're absolutely right that there are a few others, too. A good point, well made and well taken - thanks.
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      • Profile picture of the author Joe J
        Originally Posted by Scoop View Post


        ...One side effect of this trend for me has been that if I want to purchase something I will try to leave the page first just to see if there is an exit popup. It's not so irritating when you get a decent discount.
        And that is partly where the benefit of it lies for the vendor AND consumer!

        I agree. But I definitely don't like them either, not even one, other than for this reason.

        Joe
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        • Profile picture of the author James Sides
          I can see both sides of this for sure.

          @Alexa Smith - You make some Great Points and I can't disagree with everything you've said.

          From a merchant's stand point I can't say I agree with the exit pop up because they do TICK people off especially when my customer finds out he overpaid because he didn't try to leave my site. (it happens)

          But from the affiliate side most of my sites are small niche sites and chances are my visitors really aren't coming back so pop ups feel like a good value to me. Just my opinion.

          Of course, I might be a bit skewed in my opinion because my background offline was in the finance dept at auto dealerships. If the person doesn't buy what your selling in that office the day of the sale 99% of them never will.

          Great arguments coming from both sides on this one.

          Cheers all!

          James
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          "People will remain the same until the pain of staying the same is greater than the pain of change."

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  • Profile picture of the author Gill
    I agree however their target audience are the impulsive/compulsive buyers who have less or no experience in IM. Although they may hear their 'sensible voice' in their head saying "don't buy it!!!", these constant pop-ups offering them more "freebies" and exaggerating the perceived value of the product and these free bonuses will in many cases lead to a sale.

    I cannot stand them myself and really feel for those who are compelled into buying these product in this way. These desparate stakes to sell mean the product is potentially a weak one with little to offer in terms of return on their investment.

    People live and learn though.
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  • Profile picture of the author PaulMark
    No. We think they're stupid.

    The reality is that some are, and others aren't.
    Exactly.

    Confusing our likes and dislikes with a market is what keeps so many from breaking through.

    We can hate pop-ups, forced opt-in, long video sales letters, endless one time offers all we want.

    Meanwhile those using them are building bigger lists, selling more and making more money.

    I say let's stick to our guns and create smaller lists and make less! :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author Frank Ayres
    i dont like multiple popups either but they dont bother me that much to make a post about it, just forget it and move on.
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    • Profile picture of the author Shaun OReilly
      I'm a marketer but there are certain things I choose
      NOT to do such as multiple exit-pops, multiple upsells,
      etc.

      I know that in the short-term, I'm leaving a lot of money
      on the table but there are some things I will NOT do to
      make more bucks.

      To me, one exit pop is OK as a last ditch attempt to get
      me to look at an offer.

      Most vendors use multiple exit pops very crudely and that's
      part of the problem.

      If I go to a site and it has multiple exit-pops on the way
      out, I'll put that vendor in the complete wanker category.

      I treat my vistors as I like to be treated and by NOT using
      multiple exit-pops I get to keep my dignity too.

      Dedicated to mutual success,

      Shaun
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      .

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  • Profile picture of the author maxtout
    Over use of exit pop-ups are a pain in the butt, but do work if used correctly! I added an exit script that simply displayed one discounted price for a product of mine that was not making any sales, it worked a treat!

    People love to be given an offer, it's just the way people are.

    The exit scripts that virtually won't let you off the site unless you buy the product should not be used unless you are a traffic warden and love peeing people off!

    Just my thought!

    Max
    xxx
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  • Profile picture of the author Ken Leatherman
    NCMEDIA, Alexa, Ed,

    Now this type of debate is the reason I keep coming back to this forum. You added good solid thinking; to a topic which has been beaten to death here in the WF.

    Your replies, hopefully will reach out to others and give them food for thought.

    Thanks guys for your post.

    Ken Leatherman

    The Old Geezer
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  • Profile picture of the author David McKee
    Alexa hits the nail on the head (As usual). Imagine being accosted at the exit of a store (say Radio Shack where this actually has happened to me!) I dont go to Radio Shack anymore. Why? Well, I hate being bothered when I am browsing - and I don't think anyone else likes it either.

    The statistics that I have seen that show how great Exit pops are, are the ones usually touted by persons selling exit pop-up scripts....hmmmm

    Anyway, regardless, They are scammy and unprofessional. My opinion of course, but I think long runs statistics will bear this out.

    -DTM.
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  • Profile picture of the author truesouth
    Originally Posted by Ian Clifford View Post

    I check out loads of offers.

    I don't buy that many.

    I've been around a while and I know that most products aren't going to teach me much new.

    BUT, why does everyone with a new product on CB try and grab me when I exit with the 'OK/Cancel' popup?

    And how many do you need?

    If I 'OK' to leave once, DO NOT try it another five times!

    I HATE them and it makes me think that they are trying to scam me into buying their product.

    In fact it means that I'll never buy anything that the do, ever.

    What say you?
    Is another form of marketing. And it works.

    If you are bothered, is because you see it from the standpoint of the consumer. Have you ever seen from the standpoint of the producer or seller?
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    "Move out of your comfort zone. You can only grow if you are willing to feel awkward and uncomfortable when you try something new." Brian Tracy
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  • Profile picture of the author anthony2
    I use an exit pop up on my website because it works.
    The visitor will see the popup just one time and thats all.

    I disagree when the website owner is trying to trap you with
    exit popup after exit popup after exit popup.

    Thats extremely annoying.
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  • Profile picture of the author ronr
    Like almost any other type of marketing..

    Used properly they work

    Used improperly they annoy
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  • Profile picture of the author talfighel
    I have to say that it is OK to use an exit pop up ONCE. This is very effective.

    But when a vendor used 2-3-4-5 pop ups, that is annoying.

    Tal
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  • Profile picture of the author Steven Miranda
    I hate them with a passion....
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  • Profile picture of the author Wills
    I don't like them, but I have to admit that if I am interested in a product, I will hit the back button, to see if there is a pop-up offer.

    In general though, I do not like them because I spend a lot of time surfing. Which means I get loads of pop-ups.

    But I am sure some people have tested them and found them to be helpful for some sites.
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  • Profile picture of the author jamjar919
    Lucky for me, Google Chrome has a feature that allows you to automatically close all future popups in a webpage once the first one opens.
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    Feel free to ask me any IM related questions or add me on skype :D
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  • Profile picture of the author Trivum
    Originally Posted by Ian Clifford View Post

    Stop the exit pop-ups! Do they think we're stupid?
    Yes ... among other things.
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  • Profile picture of the author SShip
    I can't stand them and refuse to use them myself. If you're going to use them, it's ok but use one not any more than that. They get very annoying. I just received an email the other day from someone and when I went to leave their site, it had 6 pop-ups and that irritated me. Instead of saving it to look at it again later, I deleted it.
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