This is starting to irritate me

by Ken28
51 replies
I've mentioned this before and had some suggestions.

Now, I don't have too much trouble selling in person, but what is it about the Internet and why I can't sell my artwork online? I just don't get it. I get tons of compliments but hardly any online sales.

Here is a sample

Wayne Gretzky Canvas Art - Guelph Collectibles For Sale - Kijiji Guelph Canada.

And another

Sidney Crosby Team Canada Canvas Print - Guelph Collectibles For Sale - Kijiji Guelph Canada.

I've been told before that I'm not charging nearly enough. How can I charge more when I have nobody buying at these low prices?

I'm about to say the heck with this niche of mine and ditch it before wasting more time and money on it. I have other niches nowhere near the level of skill as this one that do very well. For some reason though I can't give away my artwork online.
#irritate #starting
  • Profile picture of the author IM Nick
    Is Kijiji your primary traffic source? If so that may be the problem. You would have better luck advertising on sports forums, blogs, and so forth. Since it is art you can charge whatever people are willing to pay for it. If you find a place where die hard hockey fans hang out you should be able to sell your art while charging more.
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  • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
    Banned
    Hi Ken,

    I have to preface my remarks by saying that although I do know a little about the art market, I know nothing at all about sport, and this sort of "art market".

    Originally Posted by Ken28 View Post

    I've been told before that I'm not charging nearly enough.
    I'm not surprised.

    Your prices appear terribly low, to me.

    Originally Posted by Ken28 View Post

    How can I charge more when I have nobody buying at these low prices?
    Can I say this very "openly" without offending you? You're making an assumption here that few marketers will share: you're assuming that higher prices will make them harder to sell rather than easier.

    I could tell you 100 stories illustrating examples of exactly the opposite.

    Sometimes things sell much more easily at much higher prices, Ken. For quite a variety of different reasons - it's not even as simple as just "perceived value".

    I have no idea whether this might be true of your work. All I know for sure is that you've already decided it's not true, and that's not helping you. (Even if you happen to be right).

    Originally Posted by Ken28 View Post

    I'm about to say the heck with this niche of mine and ditch it before wasting more time and money on it.
    I think you should be looking at other, completely different marketing methods and outlets; I really do.
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    • Profile picture of the author rising_sun
      Banned
      Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

      Hi Ken,

      I have to preface my remarks by saying that although I do know a little about the art market, I know nothing at all about sport, and this sort of "art market".



      I'm not surprised.

      Your prices appear terribly low, to me.



      Can I say this very "openly" without offending you? You're making an assumption here that few marketers will share: you're assuming that higher prices will make them harder to sell rather than easier.

      I could tell you 100 stories illustrating examples of exactly the opposite.

      Sometimes things sell much more easily at much higher prices, Ken. For quite a variety of different reasons - it's not even as simple as just "perceived value".

      I have no idea whether this might be true of your work. All I know for sure is that you've already decided it's not true, and that's not helping you. (Even if you happen to be right).



      I think you should be looking at other, completely different marketing methods and outlets; I really do.
      I think you should carry on considering following facts. Hope you will try to find some thing more effective and attractive tactics.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    Ken, the artwork is excellent, but your descriptions are boring to anybody but another artist. How many people looking for some hockey art to decorate their den even know what a "giclee" is?

    Since the art isn't selling anyway, why not try an experiment?

    Rewrite the descriptions to make them more about the buyer having a piece of art they can be proud of, what the subject has meant to the sport, etc. Stir up some emotion around owning one of these prints. If they are signed/numbered, stress the limited number available.

    Take your current description and distill it down to a sentence or two stressing the benefits of giclee vs. normal print and the museum-grade protection from your methods.

    Then tack a zero onto the price.

    You aren't selling any now, so what do you have to lose?

    Just thought of something else...

    What are you doing to market your prints besides listing them on kijiji?
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    • Profile picture of the author James Clark
      To the Op,

      I have no idea how to sell Art online. But I would have a question. How do you know there is a Market for buying Art online? This is one on the things where market research is really important.

      I sit on a Board here in New York and it never comes up.
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      • Originally Posted by Alexa Smith;3722147Your prices appear [I

        terribly[/I] low, to me.

        Can I say this very "openly" without offending you? You're making an assumption here that few marketers will share: you're assuming that higher prices will make them harder to sell rather than easier.

        I could tell you 100 stories illustrating examples of exactly the opposite.

        Sometimes things sell much more easily at much higher prices, Ken. For quite a variety of different reasons - it's not even as simple as just "perceived value".

        I think you should be looking at other, completely different marketing methods and outlets; I really do.
        Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

        Ken, the artwork is excellent, but your descriptions are boring to anybody but another artist. How many people looking for some hockey art to decorate their den even know what a "giclee" is?

        Since the art isn't selling anyway, why not try an experiment?

        Rewrite the descriptions to make them more about the buyer having a piece of art they can be proud of, what the subject has meant to the sport, etc. Stir up some emotion around owning one of these prints. If they are signed/numbered, stress the limited number available.

        Take your current description and distill it down to a sentence or two stressing the benefits of giclee vs. normal print and the museum-grade protection from your methods.

        Then tack a zero onto the price.

        You aren't selling any now, so what do you have to lose?

        Just thought of something else...

        What are you doing to market your prints besides listing them on kijiji?
        These are the 2 points I was going to make, as well, so no sense in re-typing it. lol. Especially in regard to RAISING your prices. I've spent much more than that on a framed poster.

        One more point: Unless your customer is a serious collector of art, you probably won't sell many of the giclee prints. I'm not saying I wouldn't offer the option, but 99% of people won't even know what it is, much less have a need for it.

        Your niche is highly targeted, so you need to be wherever the hockey fanatics go. And I mean FANATICS, not just a typical 'fan'. And secondly, serious artwork is bought by people with serious money.

        Your artwork is awesome, so I'm sure you'll be able to sell it sooner or later. Maybe this is just meant to be your 'starving artist' period. lol.

        Hope this helps and best of luck.
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        • Profile picture of the author Ebbo
          If you haven't already done so, join deviantart . com [can't post links yet, just remove spaces between period for link].

          it is a place where artist show and sell thier stuff. And join sports forums also to show your work [NHL, NFL, etc].
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  • Profile picture of the author YellowGreenMedia
    I was wondering to if Kijiji was your main source of traffic, maybe you should setup a wordpress site to sell your art to, you could aim for the keywords as club, and player name and such.

    You need to target the supporters of these clubs, i have no idea about ice hockey i am a Football (soccer) man myself.... but you could also go to forums about these clubs, interact and tell these fans and have a link to your art blog in your signature

    That is your targeted audience, and trust me fans will buy anything that is related with there club, especially one of kind things like your art (you should see my office room lol)

    And how about setting up a fanpage for a particular ice-hokey club and keep that up with info and news about the club and of course your art, fans will love to buy from you, your art looks great and yes you should up the prizes.

    Thanking a little but further maybe if you have your own website, maybe you could make custom art for ice hockey fans, like they order a piece of one of the players and you create it for $$$ of course.

    The possibilities are endless
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  • Profile picture of the author Meharis
    Originally Posted by Ken28 View Post

    I've mentioned this before and had some suggestions.

    Now, I don't have too much trouble selling in person, but what is it about the Internet and why I can't sell my artwork online? I just don't get it. I get tons of compliments but hardly any online sales.

    Here is a sample

    Wayne Gretzky Canvas Art - Guelph Collectibles For Sale - Kijiji Guelph Canada.

    And another

    Sidney Crosby Team Canada Canvas Print - Guelph Collectibles For Sale - Kijiji Guelph Canada.

    I've been told before that I'm not charging nearly enough. How can I charge more when I have nobody buying at these low prices?

    I'm about to say the heck with this niche of mine and ditch it before wasting more time and money on it. I have other niches nowhere near the level of skill as this one that do very well. For some reason though I can't give away my artwork online.
    Ken,
    You're not the only one having a problem in this world.
    It's not that bad. Relax and think positive.
    I believe "JohnMcCabe's #4" gave you a very good hand right there
    to start correcting your problem.
    In the other hand place your art in sites like Cafepress, Amazon, eBay and
    placing ads in every place you can. Not to mention having your own
    site in case you don't have one. Make sure you've a darn good domain
    to go along. Write some reports and post them in your own website.
    Last but not least, remember: Test, test, test and test more when you're done.
    I don't wish "Luck". I wishing you tons of Wisdom and Focus.
    Meharis
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  • One other thing: Your product descriptions are not SEO-friendly at all. Unless I type "canvas giclee Wayne Gretzky Ken Babcock" or something similar into the search engine, I'm not gonna find you. hockey, wayne gretzky, and artwork don't show up anywhere in your description, and that's what your customers would be typing in.

    BTW http://www.deviantart.com the poster above mentioned is an excellent, very busy site for artistic-minded people.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mo Goulet
    Try working with a Facebook page.

    I just built a page for a local artist here...

    Lynn Toneri RC Hink Art Gallery | Facebook

    Mo
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  • Yea not 100% what kind of traffic you are getting or how targeted it is, but I would say this is where you need to focus. Perhaps you could give us some indication as to what kind of traffic you have been getting, and where it's coming from.

    At the end of the day, you ideally want people looking for what you are offering. In the examples I guess it is 'hockey art'? So you want people looking for this and then landing on your site offering them exactly that.
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    • Profile picture of the author Karen Blundell
      I would totally change your descriptions and up your prices!

      You will be surprised how that can make a big difference, sometimes.
      "Spruce up your man-cave with a piece of hockey history - Wayne Gretsky Canvas Art! "

      etc., etc...

      go create accounts over at hockey/sports forums and link to your artwork ads in your forum signature ...and yes, I would also create a Facebook fanpage to showcase your art, like Mo suggested.
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  • Profile picture of the author bradmarcus1
    Hello Ken28. Your artwork looks very good.

    Kijiji isn't exactly a site for art lovers. Your best bet is to find big forums and blogs dealing with art, buying and selling art, art lovers etc....or forums dealing with sports/sports fans/Hockey for your Wayne Gretsky picture. Give Craigslist a try too.

    And be patient.

    To Your Success,
    Brad Marcus
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  • Profile picture of the author chrissyb
    I don't think the art is presented in it's best light on that site - on my Imac the art seems to disappear into the corner. However not everyone are using such high resolution displays...Still I'd still be looking for a platform a little bit more aesthetic...

    However as mentioned previously, if you can target buyers specifically looking for this product, perhaps they won't mind too much?
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    • Profile picture of the author lnguyentx
      I don't do art or know how to sell them but what i do notice on youtube is people using videos to show off their artwork by painting a whole portrait and shrinking the video down to four minutes than uploading to youtube. Here is an example.


      So if I were you I would do this:

      1. Open up a blog with a portfolio of your work and more information about yourself.

      2. Make a youtube account

      3. Go on google and find the hottest searches for a celebrity

      4. Make a video of yourself painting that celebrity and upload it on youtube

      5. Link all of your videos to your blog that gives the viewer an opportunity to by your art work.
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      • Profile picture of the author Raindance
        Great advice already given to you. I'll just add, make your promotion more and more specific. Try getting those athletes' greatest fans see this.

        and this video I've never seen anyone do anything such brilliant on photoshop. It definitely is the most beautiful thing I've ever seen in this forum.
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        • Profile picture of the author Ken28
          Originally Posted by Raindance View Post

          Great advice already given to you. I'll just add, make your promotion more and more specific. Try getting those athletes' greatest fans see this.



          and this video I've never seen anyone do anything such brilliant on photoshop. It definitely is the most beautiful thing I've ever seen in this forum.
          This looks EXACTLY like mine.
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          • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
            Ken, here's an off-the-wall idea for you...

            Since your art sells well in person, why not look for more ways to get it in front of people? Can you partner with actual galleries or dealers or even auction houses to sell your art and split the proceeds?

            The last time my wife and I took a cruise, they had two art auction aboard the ship. The one she got me to attend had a whole series of golf-related prints - Arnold Palmer driving with a butt hanging from his lip, Nicklaus when he won the Masters at 46, that kind of thing. Those prints sold for multiple hundreds of dollars at auction.
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            • Profile picture of the author donhx
              Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

              Ken, here's an off-the-wall idea for you...

              Since your art sells well in person, why not look for more ways to get it in front of people? Can you partner with actual galleries or dealers or even auction houses to sell your art and split the proceeds?

              The last time my wife and I took a cruise, they had two art auction aboard the ship. The one she got me to attend had a whole series of golf-related prints - Arnold Palmer driving with a butt hanging from his lip, Nicklaus when he won the Masters at 46, that kind of thing. Those prints sold for multiple hundreds of dollars at auction.

              Exactly. Sell where your customers are, not where they are not. You'll get top price there wherever it may be... sport hall of fame, game venues, the web sites of the subjects, related sport sites.

              Triple your price and offer a 50% discount to these other vendors. They will sell better if they are framed, though shipping is always a problem with glass. But people do not value art that highly if it comes in a tube.
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  • Profile picture of the author Louis Raven
    Are they "not selling" or have you simply not sold any? Has you ads been viewed but no conversions? If so.. how many views? Who viewed them?

    If you had 100 people looking for sports artwork all view your ad I bet you'd make a few sales. So, my question is, how do you know they're not selling?

    Lou
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  • Profile picture of the author sjetton
    If the price is too low, it will be perceived as just not valuable enough...humans are strange. Try increasing the price in comparison to others that sell the same type of quality, to increase the perceived value...
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  • Profile picture of the author Kierkegaard
    With art (and some collectables) you always have the problem of people thinking "hey, that's pretty nice!... but I got nowhere to put it though."

    I once bought a really nice piece of art, got it home and there was nowhere to put it. It just looked out of place on the wall. I also picked up a really rare film poster (and a frame too) I did put it on the wall but even I admit it doesn't really fit in. The same goes for a piece of ancient pottery I spent almost a grand on too.

    The point is, you really need to find your (probably small) target audience and hone in on them, hard.
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  • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
    Hey Ken,

    A lot of excellent points, above. I won't rehash, too much. But I agree with
    many of them.

    Short list: (some suggestions already made, but another confirmation perhaps.)

    1. Dedicated website/blog with appropriate domain.

    Hockeyartprints
    Sportsartprinits... etc.

    2. Make the site very nicely designed. It is much like an art gallery. People
    walk-in and the atmosphere is different. Perhaps a minimalist approach, lots
    of white space... no ads... no adsense, etc.

    3. Optimize for search, need to do keyword research. Like was mentioned, your
    audience is highly targeted. You don't need a ton of people to make money.

    4. Yes, market research. You must discover where your audience is online. Maybe
    buy serious art mags that are for people who love art and certain niches like sports.
    May be tough to find. I'm just making a distinction between someone who may want
    your prints and those who love art but have no interest in sports.

    Also, where I'm going with this point is to look for places in the mags that are online.
    You may be able to find an audience that way... follow all trails where they may go.

    5. Follow advice above regarding your copy.

    From a copywriter's perspective, I would tell you to address what may be the most
    commonly asked questions in the minds of your visitors.

    Why would I want to buy something like this for 600 or 800.00?

    I can think of a few reasons, but you need to give some solid reasons and put them
    on your site.

    6. Imagine this... someone lands on your art gallery (site). It's very clean... pristine,
    quiet. No noise.

    They see your fine art prints and eventually see the prices.

    "Wow. They must be something to sell for that much."

    Of course they are...

    Avoid too much copy about the nuts and bolts. People don't buy the nuts
    and bolts with art. No way.

    They buy it because it's beautiful. They have passion for the subject. They
    are buying something they can give to their kids... or sell later at an auction.

    Let me ask you this?

    If someone bought a $500 fine art print of Babe Ruth, Mickey Mantle, Jackie
    Robinson, Shoeless Joe Jackson, Jim Thorpe... Jesse Owens... any great athlete
    from an era that is gone forever... bought it way back when...

    Do you suppose it would be worth more than 500, today?

    Hell yes. You see?

    You are selling greatness. Sports legends. Art prints that embody the highest
    achievements in sports. But it is not merely "sports," it is human effort.

    Overcoming all the challenges and obstacles to achieve individual greatness.

    Your art prints embody all the things that many people want all over the world
    and have wanted all throughout history.

    That is what you are selling, Ken.

    Never refer to them as simply, prints. They are art prints. Fine art prints.

    You can sell these things, Ken, and all you need to do is describe the essence,
    ideas and intangible values within each print.

    Do famous paintings have a price tag physically on them?

    Never.

    Put your prices after the descriptions, not right next to the images of your prints.


    Ken
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    • Profile picture of the author genietoast
      When I looked at your artwork, I thought it was a really expensive poster.

      I had to look twice to realize it was actually a painting.That is amazing work! Very realistic.

      However, selling online is a little different than selling offline. You have seconds to make an impression before someone decides if they're interested or not.

      Since I thought you were selling an $80 poster, then it's likely others might have thought the same.

      You mentioned before that you were able to sell your paintings in person quite easily for much more.

      My recommendation is to get a professional website done that showcases your artwork, and then advertise your website to get people to come to your gallery.

      Your website can also offer online purchases and delivery if you desire. This way, you brand your name as an artist and the type of artwork you do.

      I would also recommend trying to sell these paintings in sporting events, hand people a business card with your website and contact details.

      Your paintings obviously sell. Just use the internet to get the word out about your artwork and sell them from your own website or personal gallery instead.

      As an artist, you want to be known as well as make money. So use the internet to brand yourself and point the direction to where your art gallery is.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steven Dybka
    Originally Posted by Ken28 View Post

    I've mentioned this before and had some suggestions.

    Now, I don't have too much trouble selling in person, but what is it about the Internet and why I can't sell my artwork online? I just don't get it. I get tons of compliments but hardly any online sales.

    Here is a sample

    Wayne Gretzky Canvas Art - Guelph Collectibles For Sale - Kijiji Guelph Canada.

    And another

    Sidney Crosby Team Canada Canvas Print - Guelph Collectibles For Sale - Kijiji Guelph Canada.

    I've been told before that I'm not charging nearly enough. How can I charge more when I have nobody buying at these low prices?

    I'm about to say the heck with this niche of mine and ditch it before wasting more time and money on it. I have other niches nowhere near the level of skill as this one that do very well. For some reason though I can't give away my artwork online.
    Your first mistake is that your posting your art in one place like Guelph Ontario Kijiji which is a very small audience.
    You should post your ads on every version of Kijiji in Ontario most especially the Toronto Kijiji
    Also think about making a website to offer your art and also set up a shipping process through Canada Post or UPS,that will increase your sales.


    Steve
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  • Profile picture of the author Ken28
    Wow, what a response!

    Rather than replying to each individual separately, I will respond here and try to incorporate all the questions that were asked. If I respond to everyone there will obviously be some answers repeated a few times.

    You have all made exceptional points, and I thank you for it.

    Kijiji is not my main market to sell. Kijiji is simply like Craigslist; a local online advertisement.

    The reason I didn't use specific keywords in my kijiji ads is because with kijiji I was targeting locals in my city only. People go there to browse around and I was hoping to catch some of them.

    I've made a few sales on kijiji in the past, but not much. I've tried other online "art sites" such as Etsy, Fine Art America, WetCanvas and a few others - nothing!

    I have sold one piece by going to specific forums. But I have found that most forums or boards do not allow advertising. They yank the posts down right away.

    Keep in mind that I don't just paint "sports". It just happens the two samples I posted here were sports related.

    I fully agree that the ads posted appear boring. Again, I was just trying to capture some interest from locals, but I should have known better.

    I have experimented with prices in the past. I've listed as high as $250 for similar prints and did not sell any.

    My local sales are much better when potential buyers see the pieces in person. They are usually wowed and buy on the spot. I do receive a fair amount of repeat business and referrals for custom pieces. I just figured if I could make these sales online without having to physically be present, I could make the same amount of money while dedicating my time to other niches.

    My conversion rate is only around 1%. I make 1 sale for roughly every 100 views.

    I've actually thought just recently about creating a video to post on YouTube with one of my Nickelback paintings to see what happens. Nickelback videos receive enormous amounts of traffic.

    Ken, I do agree that I should never use the term "print" again and I should only refer to them as "fine art prints". You made some good points with your particularly long post. Thanks for taking the time to lend a hand.

    Thanks everyone!
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  • If you decide to start a blog, I would recommend the Sophisticatedfolio theme from Woothemes. It's very elegant, but very simple. You can see it here:

    http://demo.woothemes.com/sophisticatedfolio/

    Be sure to click on the Portfolio link to see how that looks, as well.

    Oh, and instead of 'advertising' in forum POSTS, use your signature, instead. Most forums don't have a problem with that as long as you are making relevant posts.
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  • Profile picture of the author CheapTrafficDude
    Try putting them up on Fotolia. You wouldn't get a lot of money out of it but if you're just going to give up the niche might as well try something else right? Move over to plan b, there's always a plan b. You might get a few bucks per sold photo, you get artist protection of your artwork as well as exposure. You're definitely not the only one who has "hockey superstars" as a niche and a lot of people who need nice pics for their websites go to Fotolia for half decent prices and get the "publisher" rights.
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  • Profile picture of the author dc_publius
    I took a quick look and I wouldn't buy because it looks pretty much like a photo - but a hell of a lot more expensive than a photo. Make it more artsy.

    The second problem is that people don't want to spend a ton of money on art they haven't seen in real life anyway. It's an emotional purchase.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ken28
      Originally Posted by dc_publius View Post

      I took a quick look and I wouldn't buy because it looks pretty much like a photo - but a hell of a lot more expensive than a photo. Make it more artsy.

      The second problem is that people don't want to spend a ton of money on art they haven't seen in real life anyway. It's an emotional purchase.
      I see what you're saying about making it "more artsy" but this is my style. I can't change the way I paint otherwise I would not enjoy it and I don't do things I don't enjoy.

      So you wouldn't buy because basically my painting is too good?
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      • Profile picture of the author Steven Dybka
        Originally Posted by Ken28 View Post

        I see what you're saying about making it "more artsy" but this is my style. I can't change the way I paint otherwise I would not enjoy it and I don't do things I don't enjoy.

        So you wouldn't buy because basically my painting is too good?
        Things like this make me laugh,someone telling you to change your style of painting,first of all never allow anyone to discourage you and make you change your style of anything you do,and second your paintings are awesome and I know any hockey enthusiast would buy your work up in seconds.You just need to put it in front of the right audience.
        And for petes sake raise your prices,60 bucks is not even close to what I would charge for these,you are under valuing your work doing so.


        Steve
        Signature

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        • Profile picture of the author Ken28
          Originally Posted by Steven Dybka View Post

          Things like this make me laugh,someone telling you to change your style of painting,first of all never allow anyone to discourage you and make you change your style of anything you do,and second your paintings are awesome and I know any hockey enthusiast would buy your work up in seconds.You just need to put it in front of the right audience.
          And for petes sake raise your prices,60 bucks is not even close to what I would charge for these,you are under valuing your work doing so.


          Steve
          Thanks. I couldn't change my style now even if I wanted to. I'm 35 and I've been painting for over 25 years. Can't change my style now.

          I've tried raising my prices in the past and got nothing from it. All I get is compliments with very few buyers online.
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          • Profile picture of the author Steven Dybka
            Originally Posted by Ken28 View Post

            Thanks. I couldn't change my style now even if I wanted to. I'm 35 and I've been painting for over 25 years. Can't change my style now.

            I've tried raising my prices in the past and got nothing from it. All I get is compliments with very few buyers online.
            Like someone said a few posts up,try putting them in art galleries,you would probably have a better chance in person than online but I would suggest that you build yourself a professional looking website with a theme something like this one
            StudioPress Theme Demo

            and have all your work on that site and use the site as your business card when you promote your art at the galleries,I would also make a slide show video and post it on youtube with a url back to your site and setup a shopping cart system so buyers can buy directly from your site too.


            Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author donhx
      Originally Posted by dc_publius View Post

      I took a quick look and I wouldn't buy because it looks pretty much like a photo - but a hell of a lot more expensive than a photo. Make it more artsy.

      "Make it more artsy." A classic!

      Reminds me of the film Amadeus. Emperor Joseph II didn't like Mozart's music. He told Mozart: "Your work is ingenious. It's quality work. And there are simply too many notes, that's all. Just cut a few and it will be perfect."

      Mozart replied, "Which few did you have in mind, Majesty?"

      "Make it more artsy." Proof that all opinions seem to carry equal weight here, drivel or not.
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  • Profile picture of the author HeySal
    My impression may be a tad redundant here, but............

    The artistry is excellent - however, you would never sell one to me unless I had a gift to buy for someone who wanted one. Don't take that bad, because I'm not your market. Sports don't move me. Now were the pictures a different subject, perhaps I'd buy one.

    Your target, at least for those pics are interested in sports. If you diversify the pictures, you can pick up different targets.
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    • Profile picture of the author DWolfe
      Looking at the website it is posted on. I think it needs some more promotion. Some thing like this

      Limited Edition of the Great Wayne Gretzky.

      Multi time Stanley Cup Champion

      His life time stats are.....

      It needs some hype to entice the buyers in my Opinion. Even the non hockey fan could be encourage to buy a piece of history. Sorry to say never heard of the second Hockey player
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  • Profile picture of the author Ken28
    I think I'll try that, Steve, and I'll look into that Wordpress theme too

    HeySal, I do have a diversified portfolio. I just randomly picked those two this time around. I paint everything - landscapes, seascapes, portraits, wildlife and of course sports.

    DWolfe, the second player is Sidney Crosby, currently the best hockey player in the world.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kurt
    Originally Posted by Ken28 View Post

    I've mentioned this before and had some suggestions.

    Now, I don't have too much trouble selling in person, but what is it about the Internet and why I can't sell my artwork online? I just don't get it. I get tons of compliments but hardly any online sales.

    Here is a sample

    Wayne Gretzky Canvas Art - Guelph Collectibles For Sale - Kijiji Guelph Canada.

    And another

    Sidney Crosby Team Canada Canvas Print - Guelph Collectibles For Sale - Kijiji Guelph Canada.

    I've been told before that I'm not charging nearly enough. How can I charge more when I have nobody buying at these low prices?

    I'm about to say the heck with this niche of mine and ditch it before wasting more time and money on it. I have other niches nowhere near the level of skill as this one that do very well. For some reason though I can't give away my artwork online.
    Good advice above, just make sure the next canvas you paint isn't one titled "Beating a Dead Horse".

    Where do you draw the line between money and passion? This seems to be more of a personal decision that you'll have to make. Maybe you're better off exploring the other niches for profit and keep the painting as more of a hobby.

    On the other hand you've gotten good advice above...Let me add that you may also try something like this:

    See if you can find ways of getting the autographs of the people you paint. Maybe be more business-like in your decisions of who you paint in the future by factoring in the athletes you can get autographs for. How much additional value will the paintings have if they are also signed by the athlete? Is it worth the hassle?

    Also, maybe time the selling of a painting around a birthday, big event or anniversary of a big event. For example, paint Tiger Woods and wait for him to either win a Major or for his 40th birthday, which ever comes first. Then capitalize on the "hot trend" traffic and publicity from the event.

    Use the event to send out press releases telling the World about the event and how you have offered your painting to the public to celebrate Tiger's 40th birthday.

    You could even do one for charity, holding an Ebay auction, sending out Press Releases to promote the auction and cause. One example is to do a painting of Jimmy Valvano and donate it to Jimmy V's cancer foundation. Let ESPN know about it (they sponsor it). I'm thinking big here, and this is a longshot, but this may give you some inspiration for some ideas. While ESPN is a big deal, you could try something similar on a local basis, with a local sports team, charity and a local news outlet.
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    • Profile picture of the author Ken28
      I've thought about that, Kurt. This has been my hobby for many years and I finally took the plunge to earn money from this. I would certainly keep it as just a hobby if I weren't making any money at all. But I do. Just not online. That is what ticks me off. If I can sell in person, why can't I sell them online? I'm still trying to figure that one out.

      I have a painting of Tiger Woods waiting to be released when he wins his next major. Thought it would happen last week, but didn't.

      I have donated many to charity. In fact, I just finished almost a dozen a couple weeks ago. Not on the same scale as ESPN, but I do volunteer work and donate to charities all the time.

      I appreciate your suggestions.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by Kurt View Post

        Use the event to send out press releases telling the World about the event and how you have offered your painting to the public to celebrate Tiger's 40th birthday.

        You could even do one for charity, holding an Ebay auction, sending out Press Releases to promote the auction and cause. One example is to do a painting of Jimmy Valvano and donate it to Jimmy V's cancer foundation. Let ESPN know about it (they sponsor it). I'm thinking big here, and this is a longshot, but this may give you some inspiration for some ideas. While ESPN is a big deal, you could try something similar on a local basis, with a local sports team, charity and a local news outlet.
        Looking for a high profile company that's big on promoting things for charity, with a customer base proven to buy just about anything related to the company?

        I have two words for you...

        WWE and Wrestlemania.
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      • Profile picture of the author Kurt
        Originally Posted by Ken28 View Post

        I've thought about that, Kurt. This has been my hobby for many years and I finally took the plunge to earn money from this. I would certainly keep it as just a hobby if I weren't making any money at all. But I do. Just not online. That is what ticks me off. If I can sell in person, why can't I sell them online? I'm still trying to figure that one out.

        I have a painting of Tiger Woods waiting to be released when he wins his next major. Thought it would happen last week, but didn't.

        I have donated many to charity. In fact, I just finished almost a dozen a couple weeks ago. Not on the same scale as ESPN, but I do volunteer work and donate to charities all the time.

        I appreciate your suggestions.
        My follow up would be...What did you do to promote this? And, how can you take this a step (or two) further and figure out how you can make more money while helping more?

        Again, this is a personal choice for you, but I'd concentrate on this...Improve and optimize the charity aspect from an IM point of view. The worst that will happen is you help some people while doing something you like. And who knows where this road will lead you?
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  • Profile picture of the author jasondinner
    Find out where people who buy hockey memorabilia hang out and get your art in front of them, whether it's by free methods or buy simply dropping a paid banner ad on the site.

    Also, are you doing any PPC?

    Like many people have already mentioned, if that's the only place you have your art work listed for sale, then you'll never make a sale.

    I never even heard of that site.

    You should open up an ebay and amazon store and get your artwork on there. Couple the credibility of these 2 major ecommerce sites with raising your price and you have a total win win.

    THEN make good use of your product title and description to reap the benefit of good old organic search.

    I would totally cneter it around memorabilia.

    Make some youtube videos showing off your artwork.

    Make it a video response to a Gretzky tribute video with a TON of visitors.

    Do that for all of the guys you did paintings of.

    I'm just rambling random things you can do, but between what I just listed and what some other people suggested, you have enough to keep you busy and enough to start seeing some results.

    The main thing you need to focus on is figuring out where these people hang out online.

    Chances are they are hard core hockey fanatics (or whatever other sport you do this for). I bet you can get some sales if you advertise on NHL.com
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    • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
      I noticed the flag background on the Team Canada canvas print, and had an off-the-wall idea...

      Well, actually it's more like a just-off-the-wall idea...

      Have you thought about painting images for use as backdrops? Have them printed on large canvas, 6'x8', 10'x20', etc. and then market them to photographers.

      I'm just thinking that photographers would love a Canadian flag background for use as a backdrop like that, as well as other backgrounds.
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      • Profile picture of the author Ken28
        Originally Posted by Dan C. Rinnert View Post

        I noticed the flag background on the Team Canada canvas print, and had an off-the-wall idea...

        Well, actually it's more like a just-off-the-wall idea...

        Have you thought about painting images for use as backdrops? Have them printed on large canvas, 6'x8', 10'x20', etc. and then market them to photographers.

        I'm just thinking that photographers would love a Canadian flag background for use as a backdrop like that, as well as other backgrounds.
        I have thought about something like this in the past. I'm also a photographer.

        When you say "have them printed" I actually do that myself too. I have all the equipment in my studio. I have printers the size of a small car.

        I'll let the cat out of the bag here. I already do this, however, in a digital format. Basically the photographer would shoot using a green screen and then cut the subject(s) out in Photoshop and drag them over one of my digital backgrounds. There, I let it slip, that's one of my niches. I don't care if anyone copies the idea because I have a client base of some pretty well known photographers - and they only order their backgrounds from me.
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        • Profile picture of the author Dan C. Rinnert
          Originally Posted by Ken28 View Post

          When you say "have them printed" I actually do that myself too. I have all the equipment in my studio. I have printers the size of a small car.

          I'll let the cat out of the bag here. I already do this, however, in a digital format.
          I guess I'm mildly prophetic then.

          Basically the photographer would shoot using a green screen and then cut the subject(s) out in Photoshop and drag them over one of my digital backgrounds.
          Cool. I have a nice American flag backdrop (real one, not digital). That's what made me think of the backdrops when I saw your Canadian flag.

          I have a green screen too. One of these days, I'll actually use it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Hortensia
    Hey Ken,

    Genietoast is right. Make use of YouTube, Facebook etc. and use the internet to brand yourself, directing people to a gallery near 'you', where you have an exhibition or an agent and there you make the sale, for good prices.

    But selling your art online, I think is, if not impossible, so rare that it does not justify the time and effort.

    it's just not the right product for online sales.

    Cheers,
    JanPaul
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  • Well when it come to selling it's more of psychological thing. That's were a lot of people drop the ball at. You have to think, who is your target market? When it come to selling art usually your target market is going to be people who have money. So by selling your art work cheap, well that's what the people who have money going to think about your work and that its cheap. So raise your price and test it out and let us know how that work for you.
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  • Okay I did a search for wayne gretzky and he is getting about 135,000 Global Monthly Searches and about 60,000 monthly searches, and you very little competition. Now what I would do is build a blog, around wayne gretzky and sell your art work through your website.
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  • Profile picture of the author NateC
    Are you a member of any sports forums? You can post on there and show your artwork in your posts. Just one simple solution to go with all the other great info that people have given you.
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  • Profile picture of the author Macksheppard
    Hi Ken,

    There have been a lot of good comments. I promote on Kijiji quite a bit. When I looked at your ad I saw the problem immediately. Your copy is focused on the construction of the painting in an attempt to prove quality. Forget all that and focus your copy on why people love the game. Why do collectors collect...not because you use better glue to hold the canvas on the wood frame.

    A collector may collect a picture like that because they love Wayne Gretzky. Because they want to fill out their collection with an awesome picture of their hero. They want to show it off to their buddies. There is a certain pride a complete collection.
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