Kicking Google To The Curb

by Zeus66
32 replies
If you aren't convinced to build a list yet, let me add Reason #2,050,847 (I think that's what the official tally is up to now)...

The bigger your list grows, the less you
care about traffic from Google.


A list is traffic on tap. Anytime you want it, to any page you wish to direct it.

As long as the people on your list trust you, it's money on tap too. Your list members will buy at a much higher rate than traffic you get from Google (or just about anywhere else).

Want to make money as an affiliate marketer? Guess what? Yep, a list is the best way to crank out the affiliate commissions.

Stop fighting it. Stop spinning your wheels on 10 different "projects" at once. Focus all of your energy on getting that list built and growing. Learn how to "talk" to your list members so they believe and trust you. Then don't be afraid to send them offers. They will repay that trust in you by buying what you recommend. Just don't do them wrong by sending crappy offers or you'll lose them (as you should).

It REALLY is this simple. Stop coming up with reasons why it won't work for you. It WILL work for you. But you have to DO the work.

John
#curb #email marketing #google #kicking #list building #trust
  • Profile picture of the author oneplusone
    So a push button system does exist after all.

    Well not quite ... but it's damn close

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  • Profile picture of the author Sonomacats
    Unfortunately, what a lot of people do is entice people to join their list with what sounds like a great freebie and then do nothing but try to sell to them over and over and over, multiples times a week with little value. And then they wonder why people don't respond and unsubscribe as fast as they can.

    I've been following one individual for years who does it the right way. He sends one eMail a week with a great tip - always something to think about, or inspiration, or encouragement. Always tons of value. And puts it at the beginning of his eMail.

    Then it's followed by a short "shameless marketing section". And I mean short. 5-10 lines max where he talks about something coming up that he things his list might be interested in.

    Then he follows it with about 3-4 affiliate products - again, no more than 1-2 lines per product and always just why he recommends it.

    Then it's followed by a humor section.

    So I always read his eMails. I know when they're coming and I look forward to them. They're useful, interesting, fun and full of value. If I'm thinking about purchasing something, I check to see if he has it first.

    His eMails make it clear he's thinking about and cares about his readers. It also tells me he cares about what he's doing. Money is not his bottom line. As a result, he does extremely well. Because I trust him, and clearly, so does the rest of his subscribers.

    He's not an internet marketer, but is definitely someone IMers should emulate.

    As I said at the top, I've been on his list for over 10 years and would never consider unsubscribing. Unlike most IMers who bombard me with the latest and greatest with no value or content remotely related to the free guide I signed up for. And who don't get to keep me on their list for more than a week.

    I think it comes down to - do you care about what you're doing? Do you care about that niche? Do you care about that topic? Because I can guarantee you, that if you don't, neither will your subscribers care about your eMails. Because they can see right through the hype. It might take a few weeks before they realize that all the eMails subsequent to the initial guide are just one big "Buy this now!" crap after another. But they will get it eventually and then they're gone.
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    • Profile picture of the author Zeus66
      Originally Posted by Sonomacats View Post

      Unfortunately, what a lot of people do is entice people to join their list with what sounds like a great freebie and then do nothing but try to sell to them over and over and over, multiples times a week with little value. And then they wonder why people don't respond and unsubscribe as fast as they can.
      The part I bolded is really where the problem lies - not in the fact that marketers often email their list many times a week with sales pitches. If you're a list marketer and you recommend anything that comes along, without a care in the world about quality or the usefulness of the product for your list members, you deserve all the bad fallout that may come your way. But there is a LOT of stuff out there, especially in the IM and MMO niches, as well as a few others.

      A list marketer who takes it on as part of his/her job to sift through some of that and pick out the really good products is one who can simultaneously sell to his list "over and over, multiple times a week" AND add a ton of value.

      Do you see how that takes your exact scenario and turns a big negative into a big positive? Now you have a list marketer who - as long as he does it responsibly - helps both himself and his list members. He makes more money from his list while his subscribers have someone they respect and trust sifting out a lot of the garbage and recommending only the better products.

      In other words, you can definitely "try to sell to them over and over and over, multiples times a week" as long as you're very discriminating and don't just jump at every offer that comes along simply to make a buck off your subscribers.

      Of course, you should add good content and your own experience and advice into the mix. That's a given, but it's also something many list marketers leave out. But hey, that's each list owner's prerogative. If they want to use their list as nothing more than a sales tool without a care for building their personal reputation and a solid repeat customer base, that's their decision.
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      • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
        Originally Posted by Zeus66 View Post

        The part I bolded is really where the problem lies - not in the fact that marketers often email their list many times a week with sales pitches. If you're a list marketer and you recommend anything that comes along, without a care in the world about quality or the usefulness of the product for your list members, you deserve all the bad fallout that may come your way. But there is a LOT of stuff out there, especially in the IM and MMO niches, as well as a few others.

        A list marketer who takes it on as part of his/her job to sift through some of that and pick out the really good products is one who can simultaneously sell to his list "over and over, multiple times a week" AND add a ton of value.

        Do you see how that takes your exact scenario and turns a big negative into a big positive? Now you have a list marketer who - as long as he does it responsibly - helps both himself and his list members. He makes more money from his list while his subscribers have someone they respect and trust sifting out a lot of the garbage and recommending only the better products.

        In other words, you can definitely "try to sell to them over and over and over, multiples times a week" as long as you're very discriminating and don't just jump at every offer that comes along simply to make a buck off your subscribers.

        Of course, you should add good content and your own experience and advice into the mix. That's a given, but it's also something many list marketers leave out. But hey, that's each list owner's prerogative. If they want to use their list as nothing more than a sales tool without a care for building their personal reputation and a solid repeat customer base, that's their decision.
        Right on, John!

        There is no "magic ratio" of information to sales messages. There is only one thing that matters...VALUE.

        In theory, you could send 10 sales messages a day, every day, as long as what's being sold offers real value to your list. But this also applies to the informational messages as well. Too many people just slap together something and call it "information". They do this for the sole purpose of "getting away with" sending out sales messages.

        To be blunt, that's a lousy way to run a list.

        All the best,
        Michael
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Originally Posted by Michael Oksa View Post

          There is no "magic ratio" of information to sales messages. There is only one thing that matters...VALUE.

          In theory, you could send 10 sales messages a day, every day, as long as what's being sold offers real value to your list....
          What is the theoretical daily ratio of unsubscribes at 10 sales messages a day?
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          • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
            Originally Posted by myob View Post

            What is the theoretical daily ratio of unsubscribes at 10 sales messages a day?
            Hi Paul,

            LOL

            It's what's known as 'hyperbole', but it was done for effect. Too many people are afraid of sending sales messages, but there's no need for that apprehension if they're selling stuff that has value.

            Also, as for the unsubscribes...I look at it as a form of self-correction. The people who stay subsrcibed are the ones the messages are for.

            Anyway, I'm not saying people SHOULD send 10 messages (of any kind) every day, but in theory, they COULD if their good messages (of any kind).

            All the best,
            Michael
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            • Profile picture of the author myob
              Hey Michael,

              I know what you really meant, and actually that is a very good point, but perhaps did need a bit of clarification for some folks.

              As a living example, I hammer all my lists everyday (one time) with very hard-hitting sales promos, but these also come with exclusive info, valuable tips, free offers, and lotsa jokes. And, they keep buying.
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  • Profile picture of the author 4Frankie
    Thanks Guys for all the helpful information - just in the process of learning to do the emails for the list and your comments are all real helpful. So its a matter of doing it carefully but you dont want to be at it all the time.

    I know a lot of emails I have had just unsubscribed. Annoyed if they dont have an unsubscribe link and you get one from them twice a day and then next 3 days. TOO MUCH
    Mind you have brought from emails also. Balance isnt it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Tim Tya Thai
    Hahah. I agree. It's true. Without a list you don't have much to go off of. You need one for instant traffic.
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  • Profile picture of the author NateC
    Amazing isn't it? Attract like minded people and say, this is really a great product and it will help you a lot with ______... Yea, the money is in the list, treat them well though.
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  • Profile picture of the author MrDay
    You're right on, there's a reason why the experts will tell you "the money is in the list".
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  • Profile picture of the author NateRivers
    Well-groomed little niche lists are the same as little ATMs.
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  • Profile picture of the author profitsforall
    Thought I'd chip in with the reasons why I never built a list despite having "the money is in the list" drummed in to me over the years.

    My main reason for inaction was wondering what the heck I would write, and the second would be the possible negative reactions to what I have written.

    It's only after reading Eric Louvier's disclosure journal that I realised that I need to step outside of my comfort zone and start building that list.

    Nobody likes criticism, but let's face it you can't keep everybody happy, and why worry about negative comments - perhaps I should look forward to the first email thanking me for the great information I've given

    So I am planning my list now, and setting myself a few ground rules to ensure that I run the type of list that I would want to be subscribed to.

    1. If i do promote something I will only promote something that I use and love.

    2. I won't worry about sales pitch to useful information ratio. I will provide useful information and if there is a product that enhances that information that I use myself then I will mention it. I will also mention any low cost or free alternatives if there are any. I want the information to be usable even if someone doesn't buy a product.

    3. I won't view someone signing up to my list as permission to send them an email every day with my new best friends brand new product. I unsubscribe from every email marketer that does this.

    4. I won't view my list in terms of earnings per subscriber. Yes I will figure out this metric, and may use it to try and figure better ways of monetising my list, but never at the expense of the quality of the information I provide.

    5. I will cherish my subscribers.

    I'm sure there will be big list owners that are smirking at my naievety, knowing that I would be leaving so much money on the table by my approach, but it's the only one I'm going to be comfortable with.
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    • Profile picture of the author Michael Oksa
      Originally Posted by profitsforall View Post

      Thought I'd chip in with the reasons why I never built a list despite having "the money is in the list" drummed in to me over the years.

      My main reason for inaction was wondering what the heck I would write, and the second would be the possible negative reactions to what I have written.
      Listbuilding ain't... Anyway, that's a common concern, but you will never please everybody; no matter what you do or DON'T do.

      It's only after reading Eric Louvier's disclosure journal that I realised that I need to step outside of my comfort zone and start building that list.

      Nobody likes criticism, but let's face it you can't keep everybody happy, and why worry about negative comments - perhaps I should look forward to the first email thanking me for the great information I've given
      I'm glad that you found a source of inspiration. We can all use those from time to time. I say you should also look forward to the first negative email you get, too - at least it shows somebody's paying attention to your messages.

      So I am planning my list now, and setting myself a few ground rules to ensure that I run the type of list that I would want to be subscribed to.
      That's awesome!

      1. If i do promote something I will only promote something that I use and love.
      EXCELLENT!

      2. I won't worry about sales pitch to useful information ratio. I will provide useful information and if there is a product that enhances that information that I use myself then I will mention it. I will also mention any low cost or free alternatives if there are any. I want the information to be usable even if someone doesn't buy a product.
      Pretty good, as long as you mention any shortcomings of the alternatives (if there are any). Something along these lines, "I really like SuperProduct because it has the best Frizzle Enhancer. You can get OkayProduct, and it will do the job if you're on a budget (believe me, I remember what that's like), but just be aware that its Frizzle Enhancer is a bit wobbly.

      3. I won't view someone signing up to my list as permission to send them an email every day with my new best friends brand new product. I unsubscribe from every email marketer that does this.
      As long as the products offer VALUE and follow your 2 rules above, then I see no problem with it.


      4. I won't view my list in terms of earnings per subscriber. Yes I will figure out this metric, and may use it to try and figure better ways of monetising my list, but never at the expense of the quality of the information I provide.
      Agreed. It's really an apples-to-oranges comparison anyway. Your real currency is the relationships you build, and that's a lot harder to measure objectively.

      5. I will cherish my subscribers.
      As you should.

      I'm sure there will be big list owners that are smirking at my naievety, knowing that I would be leaving so much money on the table by my approach, but it's the only one I'm going to be comfortable with.
      Apart from the minor exceptions I mentioned, I think you're on the right track, and don't have to worry about leaving anything on the table.

      All the best,
      Michael
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  • Profile picture of the author pagerank
    Another thing I have noticed lately is that google seems to be on the war path against affiliate sites. My adwords account was temporarily suspended because they considered the site I was buying traffic for seemed to be sales page. Anyway after a few emails and a telephone call things were rectified and I removed my the ad.

    Funny thing is they had to go at least one level down to get to my hoplink. Anyway these troubles do not exist if you are building lists!
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    • Profile picture of the author Jonathan 2.0
      I like Google.

      It was because of them that I received my first affiliate commissions. And, when they “slapped” my sales page, they gave me a reason to create a more valuable (and amazing) website for my visitors. I suppose some people complain. Some people adapt.

      As for relying on Google, then your advice is spot on Zeus66. Thanks for sharing. :-)
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  • Profile picture of the author pagerank
    double post hate that
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  • Profile picture of the author stitchlips
    I still struggle with the whole list thing. There some niches where I just cant any ideas for list building but I am trying!
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  • Profile picture of the author uleesgold
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    Considering how bad my SEO is , I've had a fair share of successes from affiliate marketing.

    Did I have a list? no not exactly.

    Do I earn enough with affiliate marketing to pull my own weight? No. But things are getting better.
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  • Profile picture of the author Zeus66
    I didn't mention it in the OP here, but another great thing from a traffic and sales perspective when you focus more on your list is the residual effect. If you mail on a regular basis and you always include a link to somewhere (your own blog, your squeeze page, an affiliate offer, whatever), you not only get that initial surge in traffic and results, but it often drags out over several days or even a week.

    Just today I made over $50 profit from residual traffic from mailings I sent out days ago. People don't always open their emails right away, so if you mail regularly and consistently and always include a link to somewhere, the traffic builds up over time from this effect.

    YOU GOTTA BUILD THAT LIST!!!
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  • Profile picture of the author incliner
    More and more people are getting the clue that Google may not be the best thing to base your future on...theirs yes, yours no.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve Faber
    Something I often do when emailing my list is to put a little blurb at the bottom that says something like "If you know anyone that you think would enjoy this info or find it valuable, please forward it to them"

    It does help maximize the exposure, and I've gotten new visitors to my site and sales because of it, although I've yet to have one of them go super-viral like I've hoped for.

    You have to always supply a ton of value that works for your readers for this to work, and it is another incentive to overdeliver.
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    • Profile picture of the author x3xsolxdierx3x
      Great idea, Steve...even if just 5 out of every 100 people do that, you've still just increased your potential to make your message go viral.

      Originally Posted by Steve Faber View Post

      Something I often do when emailing my list is to put a little blurb at the bottom that says something like "If you know anyone that you think would enjoy this info or find it valuable, please forward it to them"

      It does help maximize the exposure, and I've gotten new visitors to my site and sales because of it, although I've yet to have one of them go super-viral like I've hoped for.

      You have to always supply a ton of value that works for your readers for this to work, and it is another incentive to overdeliver.
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  • Profile picture of the author misterkailo
    I did notice after building up a decent size list, I no longer cared if people came from Google or not. This is absolutely true!
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