Is a college degree really necessary?

by V92
221 replies
Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
#college #degree
  • Profile picture of the author ReikiGirl
    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
    Gosh, I'll try to give you a little bit of parental advice here first - cause as a parent I feel obligated. Maybe you can switch around some classes and find something that will suit your future job - if you can get the 4 year experience of just even going to college, why not get it - but do something worth your while - otherwise, just a big fat waste of money.

    Now advice from me person to person - HELL NO you don't need a college degree. My highest grade completed was 8th and I'm pretty successful. As long as you can read and write, you can do anything. But make sure you do something. Discipline is a MUST. Organization is important. Dedication is the only way you can succeed.

    Sometimes school just doesn't work for some people, I'm one of those people.
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  • Profile picture of the author jiantastic
    I don't think so. All the richest people in the world have no college education.
    I think education that you obtain from your motivation is worth more than a college education.
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    • Profile picture of the author myob
      I think you may be a little rash in making such a decison to quit school. Studying is not easy, nor is running a business. If you have a goal to owning your own business, however, the education and experience of college will be extremely helpful. In particular the diploma itself opens many doors. This is something only you can decide, but perhaps it may be good to take some time off to see for yourself how well you can do at IM. My suggestion is you are much too young to rule out obtaining a degree at least in the future.
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    • Profile picture of the author renverb
      A college degree is not really necessary
      to succeed in Network Marketing but
      Education is definitely needed.

      Many of the successful marketers will
      tell you that you should have the
      following skills:

      1 Copywriting

      2 Salesmanship

      3 Psychology

      4 You should be articulate

      5 You should be able to read (this is no joke)

      6 You should have patience

      7 You should be persistent

      you do not have to be in college to acquire
      these skills but if you are already there you
      could tailor your courses accordingly.

      The beauty of Network Marketing is that it
      can be done while you are still in college.

      If your education is not costing anything
      stay by all means and learn.

      Otherwise you can learn a lot by studying
      the right books and tapes.

      You might have to get some guidance though.

      Roy Brevner
      yorverb@yahoo.ca
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    • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
      Banned
      Originally Posted by jiantastic View Post

      All the richest people in the world have no college education.
      This statement is palpably untrue.

      There has been, in fact, a very direct correlation, worldwide, between income-level and education-level for more than a century now, ever since these things were first reliably measured and recorded.

      There's also a very small but very prominent minority of super-rich people who don't have a college education (many of whom now say that they deeply regret that and are donating billions to various educational funds and charities in an attempt to try to avoid others repeating what they see as their 'mistake') and are discussed so much in this context specifically because they don't have a college education: it's the exception that demonstrates the rule.

      If you think of education purely in terms of "earning ability", then sure, you may be disappointed (other than for vocational courses like law, medicine and MBA's), but this shouldn't be what education's about, in principle. Education is what remains with you long after the specific "stuff you learned" has been forgotten.
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    • Profile picture of the author Joshua Rigley
      Banned
      Stay in school bro. You'll regret dropping out later if you do. I know I do.
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  • Profile picture of the author AmandaT
    Personally, I am a big fan of college just because it can open a lot of doors for you. If you are serious about IM and think you can do well, sure you could quit going to school... I would suggest finishing that AA degree first... because you will have that if you decide to go back to school.
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    • Profile picture of the author im1217
      Smart girl.

      Here's a novel idea...

      do college and IM....BRILLIANT!

      I love my job and I do IM with NO pressure at all.

      Originally Posted by AmandaT View Post

      Personally, I am a big fan of college just because it can open a lot of doors for you. If you are serious about IM and think you can do well, sure you could quit going to school... I would suggest finishing that AA degree first... because you will have that if you decide to go back to school.
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  • Profile picture of the author whaldorf
    If you enjoy working in the IM field and have some ideas that you believe are worth pursuing, then I say go for it. A college degree isn't a lot of use to an entrepreneur, since you're going to be your own boss (and I doubt you'll require one of yourself!).

    There are lot of ways to make money online whether you choose to work for local businesses offline or get into something like affiliate marketing or C.P.A...

    If you love it, just do it!

    Also, a college degree can be a huge financial outlay. There's a documentary coming out soon that exposes the college loan industry as a serious racket! It's called "College Conspiracy"
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  • Profile picture of the author Dr Dan
    If you want to pursue a career that requires a degree then it will help. But for IM or Offline Marketing Consultants its not necessary.
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  • Profile picture of the author Phil Halloran
    I didn't learn much in school. I taught myself everything after I finished high school. Hopefully you have the same mind and can do the same.
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  • Profile picture of the author Brendan Vraibel
    I would suggest staying in school as it is a big regret of mine. I had the same mindset that you do but it is tough when you put all of your eggs in one basket. What if IM doesn't work out for you? What is the backup plan?

    As much of a pain formal education can be, that degree will last a lifetime for only 4 years of work. Nothing worth having in life is easy.

    Can IM be done without a college degree? Absolutely. But you always want to have options and I can assure you that without a degree, there aren't all that many appealing options.

    Good luck to you.
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    • Profile picture of the author magiclouie
      Originally Posted by B and B View Post

      I would suggest staying in school as it is a big regret of mine. I had the same mindset that you do but it is tough when you put all of your eggs in one basket. What if IM doesn't work out for you? What is the backup plan?

      As much of a pain formal education can be, that degree will last a lifetime for only 4 years of work. Nothing worth having in life is easy.

      Can IM be done without a college degree? Absolutely. But you always want to have options and I can assure you that without a degree, there aren't all that many appealing options.

      Good luck to you.
      I am with you mate. At least you have another option.

      Here in our country, it is a big advantage for us if we are a degree holder. I am not sure in other countries.

      I consider my graduation in college as one of my memorable moments and I will surely treasure it forever.

      I am not sure if this is a good idea but try to consult your parents.

      Anyway, I wish you good luck. May you be constantly blessed with success in all your fields of endeavor.
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    • Profile picture of the author Floyd Fisher
      Originally Posted by B and B View Post

      I would suggest staying in school as it is a big regret of mine. I had the same mindset that you do but it is tough when you put all of your eggs in one basket. What if IM doesn't work out for you? What is the backup plan?

      As much of a pain formal education can be, that degree will last a lifetime for only 4 years of work. Nothing worth having in life is easy.

      Can IM be done without a college degree? Absolutely. But you always want to have options and I can assure you that without a degree, there aren't all that many appealing options.
      Well, if you regret not getting a college degree, then go back and get it already.
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    • Profile picture of the author ktmakwana
      Originally Posted by B and B View Post

      I would suggest staying in school as it is a big regret of mine. I had the same mindset that you do but it is tough when you put all of your eggs in one basket. What if IM doesn't work out for you? What is the backup plan?

      As much of a pain formal education can be, that degree will last a lifetime for only 4 years of work. Nothing worth having in life is easy.

      Can IM be done without a college degree? Absolutely. But you always want to have options and I can assure you that without a degree, there aren't all that many appealing options.

      Good luck to you.
      I agree with your comment.

      It is important to have a Plan B.

      If at all possible, continue with your studying as well as your journey in IM.

      At the end of your eduction, you will be able to compare your achievements in IM and then decide the best way forward for you.

      2 quotes from Jim Rohn which are pertinent to this discussion:

      "Formal education will make you a living. Self education will make you a fortune" - The point is that if you want to succeed in this life, formal education isn't the end all. Self education is the key.

      "Profits are better than wages. Wages will make you a living, profits can make you a fortune."

      Good luck.
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  • Profile picture of the author eugie17
    To build a business you don't need a degree, you need marketing experience something you will not learn from books, videos, etc.. only you can learn by yourself, and when you know it you will not disclose it. coz it's money
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  • Profile picture of the author windso0
    i think it's important , that's why there are so many college students
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  • Profile picture of the author sodevious
    Switch your major to business, take some web design courses. ^.^
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  • Profile picture of the author Simon Lim
    Necessary for what?

    A business? No...

    Growing up? Yes...

    I did a double degree and graduated last year, best time of my life. I didn't do it for a job though, like you, I didn't want a job, still don't.

    But the experiences I had were invaluable to my growing up to be an adult. I was able to do a bunch of travelling studying overseas, learnt a lot about the world, myself, what I want to do, other people, other cultures...it definitely was time very well spent. Sure, there are other ways you can develop as a person, but for me it was necessary.

    Don't think of going to college as just a predefined path to being an employee. For most, it is. But if you want something else, why not enjoy your time there by doing stuff you want, while working on the business?

    You're only going to do this once (in most cases), and the people you meet, the experiences you have will be with you for a long time to come.

    Simon
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    • Profile picture of the author tomkane
      Originally Posted by Simon Lim View Post

      I did a double degree and graduated last year, best time of my life. I didn't do it for a job though, like you, I didn't want a job, still don't.
      May I ask why you studied then?

      @OP: Before you make changes, get clear on what YOU want. Then you can take bold action. I had big plans on getting a degree in record time, studying a year abroad and so on.

      It would have cost me nothing to study, but I decided to give it up after half a year.

      I really thought about it and part of the reason why I even started to study was social conditioning. I sounds good if you can say you study at a prominent university or if you are an alumni.

      Ultimately, you have to find out where you want to be and then search for the best way to get there.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rixter
      Originally Posted by Simon Lim View Post

      Necessary for what?

      A business? No...

      Growing up? Yes...

      I did a double degree and graduated last year, best time of my life. I didn't do it for a job though, like you, I didn't want a job, still don't.

      But the experiences I had were invaluable to my growing up to be an adult. I was able to do a bunch of travelling studying overseas, learnt a lot about the world, myself, what I want to do, other people, other cultures...it definitely was time very well spent. Sure, there are other ways you can develop as a person, but for me it was necessary.

      Don't think of going to college as just a predefined path to being an employee. For most, it is. But if you want something else, why not enjoy your time there by doing stuff you want, while working on the business?

      You're only going to do this once (in most cases), and the people you meet, the experiences you have will be with you for a long time to come.

      Simon
      Overall I agree with Simon. As someone with a college degree and a professional degree, I think my education was important to me growing up. However, my mistake was becoming an "employee" instead of starting a business immediately or shortly after getting out of school. My supervisor always tells me that he and I are too busy to become rich. He's right. Learn as much as you can. However, the others are right in that people will always be asking you where you went to school, etc.
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  • Profile picture of the author rockfuse
    You do not need a college degree , but it will not help only make you better. Education is key to be successful in life , either from being self taught or university taught. I highly recommend you attend college if all else that is something you can always fall back on.
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  • Profile picture of the author Rod Cortez
    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
    I'm with Simon on this one. Is a college degree really necessary for what?

    For success? No.
    For business? No.
    To become a doctor? Yes.
    To become a teacher? Yes.
    I could go on and on.

    It all depends on what you're trying to accomplish. In my case I wanted to be a financial planner, but I didn't realize that until 4-5 years into it, and while you can become one without going to college, I knew it was better to go to school.

    It took me 7 years to get my Business degree because I had no idea what I wanted. I changed majors a couple times, partied hard for 4 of the 7 years (ok, ok maybe 5), and ultimately I'm glad I did it that way. I took me a long time to mature. I didn't take college seriously until my senior year.

    Personally, I think college is way behind the times in many areas, and while I don't think it's necessary for actual "success" in business, if I had to do it all over again, I would. Sure, I had a fun time doing all the social stuff, but I made it point to network with other people, both other students, professors, and the professionals and entrepreneurs that came to campus. I worked on my public speaking, practice my sales pitches, and worked several internships to get an idea on what the working corporate world was like.

    To my way of thinking, you get out of college what you put into it. I graduated college with a C- average and I learned way more than my grades will ever show.

    If I ever have children I'm going to send them to college (if they want to go), but from day 1, I'm going to instill in them the pride and knowledge of entrepreneurship and frame college for what it is: a test and a learning experience.

    Maybe you need to take 6-12 months off and work your IM business to see if that's a path you really want to take at this point in your life. Maybe you need to take a year off from IM and focus on school. Who knows? Since you're 18 now, in most countries you're a legal adult so it's time to sit down, write down what you really want to accomplish and then go for it. Is this something you're able to talk about with someone with more experience than you?

    RoD
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    - Jim Rohn
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  • Profile picture of the author Dr Dan
    I am not saying you should or shouldnt because that is up to you.

    But I will say that 99.9% of my friends that make between 100k to over 1 million a year either dont have a degree or dont use the one they have.

    You will see that in the next 1-3 years they will have a degree for Internet and Social Media Consultants in local colleges.
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    • Profile picture of the author Rixter
      Originally Posted by Dr Dan View Post

      I am not saying you should or shouldnt because that is up to you.

      But I will say that 99.9% of my friends that make between 100k to over 1 million a year either dont have a degree or dont use the one they have.

      You will see that in the next 1-3 years they will have a degree for Internet and Social Media Consultants in local colleges.
      I think Dr. Dan is right. This sort of goes to the "College Conspiracy" mentioned above. There used to be no law schools. You mentored with someone and that person had to stand for you. Then academics got involved. You will see the same thing happen with IM (it is already happening in many respects). People without college degrees make the market for the knowledge that other people pay money for. Just look at all the IM courses in the review section of WF.
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      • Profile picture of the author Nightengale
        I just saw an ad today for some college offering a degree in IM. (That strikes me as pretty funny. Given the fast-paced, ever-changing nature of IM, I have a hard time seeing the value of a degree in it. Everything would have changed between your freshman and senior years.)

        Is a degree necessary to succeed as an entrepreneur? Nope. My dad is a highly successful entrepreneur, self-employed his entire life and he only has an 8th grade education. I, on the other hand, have an A.S. and got a job. Lost that job last year, was unemployed all year and now have a worse job.

        Growing up in an entrepreneurial family (my dad's entire family are entrepreneurs and never held a traditional job a day in their lives), I always felt a bit ashamed that I had a job and didn't own my own biz. (I think Warriors will understand this sentiment, but I don't think the general American public would.)

        BUT... I was raised to value education very highly. I finished my A.S. and got a job. Then went back to school (while working full time) to get my B.S. (in Marketing). Haven't finished that yet, but I will.

        Why would I do that if I don't want a job? I think getting an education is important for a couple of reasons:

        1) As others mentioned, it opens a lot of doors for you. IM is great, but you never know what life will hold. Give yourself every opportunity to succeed. You never know when you'll need a job, even if only temporarily, and a degree will make it easier to get one. Life is hard enough as it is. Stack the odds in your favor.

        2) I strongly believe there's intrinsic value in education; there's value in being an educated person, in and of itself, regardless of anything else. I LOVE learning new things (except Algebra and Accounting!) just for the sake of learning new things.

        Don't make the mistake of thinking that if you're not going to use a degree in your job (IM or otherwise) that it's a waste of time. It's not. It still holds a lot of value.

        A lot of people work in jobs not even remotely related to their major. But just the fact that they have a degree -- that they stuck it out and actually FINISHED such a major thing -- says a lot about you to an employer.

        If you have the opportunity to be in school, don't throw it away. If you're struggling with it right now, there are a few things you can do:

        1) Switch your major and/or some of your classes to something more interesting/valuable to you. You have lots of options. You're not stuck in the course of study that you're in now.

        2) Does your school offer accelerated courses? It means more work in the short-term, but accelerated course will help you finish faster. You'll finish sooner and can move on to what you REALLY want to do, but you'll still have the advantage of the degree.

        I worked full-time and went to school part-time, both in the fall and spring semesters AND during the summer, taking accelerated courses. My summer schedule was BRUTAL. I worked full-time and classes were 4 hours each night, TWICE a week (instead of 3 hours, once a week). It was a test of endurance I think.

        A Term was 6 weeks and B Term was 6 weeks. And I took TWO classes each term. I couldn't physically go in for FOUR classes a week (at 4 hours each), so I went in for one class each week (twice a week) and took one class online to manage it.

        It was tough, but when the summer was over, I'd completed the equivalent of a full load (12 hours) for an entire semester. That's FOUR classes. I was tired, but very proud of the progress I'd made. In August, I was able to check 4 classes off the list. That's a lot of classes in a short period of time! (Especially when you're taking classes like Micro and Macro Economics like I was.)

        3) If you have to, take a semester off to re-group. I offer this suggestion cautiously. It's easy to take a semester off and never go back. So be sure that you're really doing this to take a break, not to get out of it, knowing you'll probably never go back.

        If you still really feel like you MUST drop out, I'd impose some serious self-discipline and not drop out until I was actually making a certain amount of money online regularly. The amount should be whatever you need to live on. If you can't make the money, then you shouldn't be quitting school.

        I'm not lecturing. It's just blunt economic fact.

        Hope that helps!

        Sincerely,
        Michelle
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    • Profile picture of the author V92
      Originally Posted by Dr Dan View Post

      I am not saying you should or shouldnt because that is up to you.

      But I will say that 99.9% of my friends that make between 100k to over 1 million a year either dont have a degree or dont use the one they have.

      You will see that in the next 1-3 years they will have a degree for Internet and Social Media Consultants in local colleges.
      Yeah thanks a lot for the information,I believe that for an entrepreneur a degree is not necessary,its all about hard work and knowing what you want. What do most of your friends do that earn between 100k to over 1 million a year?
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      • Profile picture of the author Dr Dan
        Originally Posted by V92 View Post

        Yeah thanks a lot for the information,I believe that for an entrepreneur a degree is not necessary,its all about hard work and knowing what you want. What do most of your friends do that earn between 100k to over 1 million a year?
        Almost all of them have businesses or consulting gigs that dont really have a name for it. Kinda like us here. Its funny because I have one friend in the UK named Steve. He had some telecom type of business and sold it for Millions. Now he just started a consulting business that offers Internet Marketing as well.

        I know alot of people here are saying that you should go to school because of the social environment and growth involved. But the problem is that there will be very little growth because everyone is pretty much at the same level.

        It would be like belonging to an internet marketing forum like the warrior forum but its only for newbies. How the heck would you learn anything? Everyone would be just giving each other bad advice and just guessing on what to do.

        If you truly want to grow, then join some mentoring and inner circle type programs. Join online and offline groups. Join investing groups, join anything that has successful people in it so you can learn from them and support each other. You have so much to offer knowing all you know about IM. Most of the people in these groups will either need your services or your consulting.

        I joined an exclusive inner circle group that cost me about $120k for the year. People said I was crazy for spending that cash. But I made so many connections and was hanging in places like Monaco and Fiji with people like Tony Robbins, one of 10 Greatest Coaches in the NBA history, Governors, Spiritual Leaders, Actors, Movie Directors, Millionaires, Billionaires and more.

        Which education would you rather have?
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  • Profile picture of the author ladywriter
    The value to me was not in the curriculum (although I really liked some courses) but in the environment. So many great learning experiences.

    And I mentioned this to someone else asking about this, you leave a lot of money on the table as a businessperson if you walk away from college.
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  • Absolutely NOT. I wouldn't hesitate for a moment to leave school behind and pursue your own business if that's what you're passionate about. I myself don't even have a bachelor's degree and it has never held me back in any way that I can easily identify.

    Remember this: people are driven by their passions. When I was young, I used to think that not having a degree might hold me back. Now I know better.
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    • Profile picture of the author PalmBayChuck
      College is not necessary for success but college will introduce you to ideas and concepts that you would not otherwise deduce on your own. It will greatly expand your mental horizons and allow you to create new solutions. It increases your life experience and understanding of the way thing are. it will improve your ability to understand why people behave the way they do and most importantly, it will enable you to see opportunities where others see none.

      I'm a 47 year old man and I'm taking business class like Macro Economics, Micro Economics and Marketing that if I'd taken 20 years ago, I'd be a bazillionaire now. Those college classes are good for you.

      I'd say that you don't have to take them at the popular rate and from the expensive schools! But take them.
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  • Profile picture of the author Joe Benjamin
    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
    Sup man.

    Like you, I was 18 when I went to college and I dropped out
    after my first year for the same reason you're going for now:

    Entrepreneurship & Business.

    I'll bet you $100 I can pin point a few of the reasons WHY
    you want to drop out:

    1. NONE of the teachers you're learning from has had little if
    ANY experience in running a successful business.

    This confuses you. Here you thought "Wow! they have class
    -es on entrepreneurship!" In reality, it's classes about being
    a good manager or top level executive in other businesses.

    2. You're LEARNING a lot of theory, but you got a feeling none
    of it's applicable to anything.

    You're studying a lot, but you're not taught to put it into
    action right away. You're taught to STORE information like
    a squirrel and acorns.

    3. You feel anxiety and a bit of depression the LONGER you
    stay...because who do you please? who are you REALLY
    staying for?

    Is it family, friends, or recent high school graduates who are
    all in college themselves?

    I bet it's a combination of "all of the above".

    You know people are going to look at you funny if you drop
    out. How are YOU going to handle that pressure?

    People WILL question your decision to stop now before you
    get in to deep with college debt. Will it be enough for you
    to go back?

    It was for me...a LOT of pressure...but this is mostly program-
    ing from all your school years. Are you STRONG enough to fight
    it to pursue what YOU want to do?

    If not...you will look back 4 years from now with a shiny new
    degree and REGRET going...because in those 4 years you will
    WISH you had quit while you were only 1 year into it.

    "Damn. I spent 4-8 years of my LIFE pursuing a degree I will
    NEVER use. Now I'm starting from scratch doing what I really
    wanted to do from the beginning -- and I'd be so much further
    along had I had the balls to carve my own path".

    Granted, this "leave college mentality" doesn't apply to ALL pro-
    fessions -- only those which are not life threathing, life or death,
    (lawyers, dentist, vets, doctors, etc).

    But as an entrepreneur...if you don't quit. You WILL regret it.

    Now, I look back and I pat myself on the back everyday for
    bucking the pressure and going against the tide...because I
    flow by my own river. It was WORTH it.

    ...sometimes I wonder what I would do if after leaving college
    I didn't do what you have the FEELING to do right now...

    I would be severely depressed because I ignored my gut feeling.

    Don't ignore that gut feeling. I say "QUIT!". You have ONE life.
    Live it the way you want to.
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    • Profile picture of the author V92
      Originally Posted by WhoIsBenjamin View Post

      Sup man.

      Like you, I was 18 when I went to college and I dropped out
      after my first year for the same reason you're going for now:

      Entrepreneurship & Business.

      I'll bet you $100 I can pin point a few of the reasons WHY
      you want to drop out:

      1. NONE of the teachers you're learning from has had little if
      ANY experience in running a successful business.

      This confuses you. Here you thought "Wow! they have class
      -es on entrepreneurship!" In reality, it's classes about being
      a good manager or top level executive in other businesses.

      2. You're LEARNING a lot of theory, but you got a feeling none
      of it's applicable to anything.

      You're studying a lot, but you're not taught to put it into
      action right away. You're taught to STORE information like
      a squirrel and acorns.

      3. You feel anxiety and a bit of depression the LONGER you
      stay...because who do you please? who are you REALLY
      staying for?

      Is it family, friends, or recent high school graduates who are
      all in college themselves?

      I bet it's a combination of "all of the above".

      You know people are going to look at you funny if you drop
      out. How are YOU going to handle that pressure?

      People WILL question your decision to stop now before you
      get in to deep with college debt. Will it be enough for you
      to go back?

      It was for me...a LOT of pressure...but this is mostly program-
      ing from all your school years. Are you STRONG enough to fight
      it to pursue what YOU want to do?

      If not...you will look back 4 years from now with a shiny new
      degree and REGRET going...because in those 4 years you will
      WISH you had quit while you were only 1 year into it.

      "Damn. I spent 4-8 years of my LIFE pursuing a degree I will
      NEVER use. Now I'm starting from scratch doing what I really
      wanted to do from the beginning -- and I'd be so much further
      along had I had the balls to carve my own path".

      Granted, this "leave college mentality" doesn't apply to ALL pro-
      fessions -- only those which are not life threathing, life or death,
      (lawyers, dentist, vets, doctors, etc).

      But as an entrepreneur...if you don't quit. You WILL regret it.

      Now, I look back and I pat myself on the back everyday for
      bucking the pressure and going against the tide...because I
      flow by my own river. It was WORTH it.

      ...sometimes I wonder what I would do if after leaving college
      I didn't do what you have the FEELING to do right now...

      I would be severely depressed because I ignored my gut feeling.

      Don't ignore that gut feeling. I say "QUIT!". You have ONE life.
      Live it the way you want to.
      You have described all my reasons and what I am feeling right now about leaving college, I really feel that society wants everyone to take the safe way and go to school, get a job and live that way. I feel that I want to break out of the cycle and do something I want, which I know I can not get in school. I will have to follow my gut feeling and go with it. How is your business doing? Are the people that once doubted you trying to get in touch with you?
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      • Profile picture of the author Joe Benjamin
        Originally Posted by V92 View Post

        You have described all my reasons and what I am feeling right now about leaving college, I really feel that society wants everyone to take the safe way and go to school, get a job and live that way. I feel that I want to break out of the cycle and do something I want, which I know I can not get in school. I will have to follow my gut feeling and go with it. How is your business doing? Are the people that once doubted you trying to get in touch with you?
        Sup V92 (I wish I knew your REAL name so I could properly
        address you),

        Okay. So, there's a lot of opinions here from great warriors
        on what direction you should take in your life. They CARE!

        ...that's a AWESOME! However...

        Based on PERSONAL experience I've heard a lot of the argu
        -ments you're reading on your thread. I'll tackle as many as
        I can and share how "I" handled it - and I might just hurt a
        few feelings -- but your LIFE and HAPPINESS is at stake...

        before I do that, I want to answer your questions :

        How is your business doing?

        F**king. Awesome. Seriously. And, I'm going to be making
        my first $5k month next month (May), and $10k-$15k (April)

        Prior to this, I've been consistently doing on average $1000
        to $1500 per month profit (after expenses) online selling not
        only services but products - it's a mix.

        For 2 years I dreamed of making what I'm making now, and
        it happened in 30 days (last year February).

        For some they might say "that's not enough", but for ME it
        is plenty (I'm 22 years old. Single. NO kids. NO wife. NO debt)

        Anything OVER that is more than enough to sustain me, now
        it's like a "game" -- my needs are taken care of and I don't
        have to live in mansion to feel successful...although I am on
        the path to be a self-made millionaire.

        Are the people that once doubted you trying to get in touch
        with you?

        (LAUGHING) Yes, there are...it's funny to me because you'll
        hear it from the least UNLIKELY people. Your BIGGEST critics.

        I have very VIVID memories of great friends of mines who at
        one point gave me an "intervention" because they thought I
        was obsessed. Possessed, even. But "I" knew I was just going
        through MY "learning curve".

        Some suggested I get a little help. Some said "go back to col
        -lege while you're still young", etc. Now...

        Those SAME people came back months later asking for help
        to help THEM make money.

        Okay...that's the questions. Enough about me. Let's get back
        to YOU :

        In a SEPERATE
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      • Profile picture of the author Joe Benjamin
        Originally Posted by V92 View Post

        You have described all my reasons and what I am feeling right now about leaving college, I really feel that society wants everyone to take the safe way and go to school, get a job and live that way. I feel that I want to break out of the cycle and do something I want, which I know I can not get in school. I will have to follow my gut feeling and go with it. How is your business doing? Are the people that once doubted you trying to get in touch with you?
        Sup V92 ,,

        I want to answer your questions :

        How is your business doing?

        F**king. Awesome. Seriously. And, I'm going to be making
        my first $5k month next month (May), and $10k-$15k (April)

        Prior to this, I've been consistently doing on average $1000
        to $1500 per month profit (after expenses) online selling not
        only services but products - it's a mix.

        For 2 years I dreamed of making what I'm making now, and
        it happened in 30 days (last year February).

        For some they might say "that's not enough", but for ME it
        is plenty (I'm 22 years old. Single. NO kids. NO wife. NO debt)

        Anything OVER that is more than enough to sustain me, now
        it's like a "game" -- my needs are taken care of and I don't
        have to live in mansion to feel successful...although I am on
        the path to be a self-made millionaire.

        Are the people that once doubted you trying to get in touch
        with you?

        (LAUGHING) Yes, there are...it's funny to me because you'll
        hear it from the least UNLIKELY people. Your BIGGEST critics.

        I have very VIVID memories of great friends of mines who at
        one point gave me an "intervention" because they thought I
        was obsessed. Possessed, even. But "I" knew I was just going
        through MY "learning curve".

        Some suggested I get a little help. Some said "go back to col
        -lege while you're still young", etc. Now...

        Those SAME people came back months later asking for help
        to help THEM make money.

        Okay...that's the questions.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steve L
    It depends what you want to be when you grow up. If you want to be a doctor, or lawyer... then yes, college is important. If you want to be an entrepreneur then no, it's not as important, if at all.
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  • Profile picture of the author terrencewan
    From my point of view,
    college degree is not necessary,
    but after taking the course will made
    you a better person in terms of abilities to analyse things better.

    Is really good to know at your young age,
    you already have your own mind set,
    but may i ask why in the first place
    you take up these course?
    It is influence by others, friends,
    parents, etc?
    If it is not your own will,
    then i suggest you change course
    soon, before you made a bigger mistake by
    spending so much of your time and money,
    but later do not use what you have learnt.

    Go for something that you are passionate about,
    and you will be very successful in it.
    Stay focus, consistent, and persistent.
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  • Profile picture of the author Steven Dybka
    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
    Get yourself a proper education,you are only young once and now is the time,do your IM on the side while you are at college.it's always good to have a degree to fall back on just in case.


    Steve
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    • Profile picture of the author Joe Benjamin
      If you know how to SELL and MARKET - you will NEVER
      struggle with money or the making of it.

      A college degree will NOT teach you real world market-
      ting and sales. Period. I can't remember the last time I
      struggled with "money" as an entrepreneur...

      but I CAN remember when I was struggling with a 9 to
      5 job.

      The choice is yours. Just don't make the stupid one.

      ...the stupid one being the one you DON'T want to do
      but doing it anyway.
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  • Profile picture of the author MuhammadSalah27
    No, need for a degree Check out Affilate Marketing and MLM ( Multi Level Marketing)! As for me I am doing both! Just you have the right mind set because you want to open your business. Now, you just have to learn all you can about online marketing and just duplicate!
    Signature
    www.mlmguidetoyoursuccess.com

    Till we wake up and face our every day challenges only then can we receive and see true greatness in every aspect in life(Success). - Muhammad Salah
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  • In my opinion, a college degree is not necessary.

    I finished 2 years of college and was in the process of transferring to USC, then my father suddenly passed away from a heart attack while in the car with me. I had a choice: Fork out $45k+ per year, or self-educate and become an entrepreneur.

    Today, I still didn't finish my last couple years, but I have created a successful marketing company that's known around the world. Would a college degree have helped me? No. Did they teach Internet marketing in college when I was attending? No. Are my friends with college degrees doing much better than me? No way.

    Follow your path and remember that college isn't for everyone.
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  • Profile picture of the author herrysmart
    Banned
    [DELETED]
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    • Profile picture of the author oDigger
      College was a great social and academic experience for me and though I can't specifically think of ways it helps me in our day to day activities in IM, I know it does.

      Plus, a college degree is pretty much a mandatory badge to have these days. Let's say worse comes to worse and you need options. Employers will tend to marginalize or judge you immediately if you don't have a degree.
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  • Profile picture of the author AddictionHelper
    Completely agree with the first responder ReikiGirl, she made a brilliant reply that is 100% accurate, I could have not said it better myself.

    I never finished college but I wish I did just for the education and experience and to just have a degree. If you're getting it paid for then do it.

    But like she said hell no you don't need a degree, I don't have one either and I am pretty well off also.
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  • Profile picture of the author blueberries
    sometimes, I think college is overrated.. unless if you want to be a lawyer or doctor or something that requires to have a degree.
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    • Originally Posted by blueberries View Post

      sometimes, I think college is overrated.. unless if you want to be a lawyer or doctor or something that requires to have a degree.
      My thoughts exactly.

      If you want to follow an entrepreneurial career, you dont need a degree at all. Degrees are for those who want to become a white-collar employee.
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      • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
        Banned
        Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

        Degrees are for those who want to become a white-collar employee.
        Some people imagine so, yes. The places where many others typically learn a different, rather broader and more open-minded way of looking at it are called universities and colleges.
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        • Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          Some people imagine so, yes. The places where many others typically learn a different, rather broader and more open-minded way of looking at it are called universities and colleges.
          Yet the majority of those broader, open-minded university and college students end up being nothing but white-collar workers...
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          • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
            Banned
            Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

            Yet the majority of those broader, open-minded university and college students end up being nothing but white-collar workers...
            In contrast to the majority who haven't been there, who end up struggling to achieve even that.

            Education isn't primarily about earning-power: it's what remains with you after the stuff you learned has long been forgotten.

            But in spite of that, there's also been a very direct overall correlation, worldwide, between income-level and education-level for more than a century now, ever since these things were first reliably measured and recorded. Sorry if that fact makes your opinion a little inconvenient.
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            • Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              there's also been a very direct correlation, worldwide, between income-level and education-level for more than a century now, ever since these things were first reliably measured and recorded.
              OMG you cannot POSSIBLY believe that, do you?!?

              Do you realize that, now a days, the average carpenter or plumber with a small family business makes MUCH more than the average accountant or financial analyst, do you?

              In fact, now a days, academic education is a VERY INEFFICIENT way towards wealth. Plus on top of that, college graduates start off with a $80k debt... debts that will take them years to clean up... it's simply crazy!

              I completed my university studies but I soon realized that it wasnt for me, so I switched my corporate career for my own entrepreneurial ventures. Most of my former university pals now a days make a comfortable income working for someone else, but non of them make ANYWHERE near to what I make working from the comfort of my living room being my own boss.

              Entrepreneurship is the only way to true wealth, and you dont need a degree to become an entrepreneur.
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            • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              Education isn't primarily about earning-power: it's what remains with you after the stuff you learned has long been forgotten.
              This is one subject on which I don't quite see eye-to-eye with you, Lex.

              "Just saying", because it's very rare that I ever disagree with you. So it had to go on record when it happened, didn't it?

              I do agree with some of what you say (that an education can instil traits/values that stay with you long after your subject-knowledge has dissipated), just not your conclusions and the fact you seem to be able to so easily advise people - almost on a blanket basis - that "going to university is a much better choice, and I personally don't know many people who regret it, so neither will you", without knowing who they are, what they're like or why they want to go (not why you think they ought to).

              I suspect you're a bit of a natural academic, and that so too are many of those with whom you "hang around".

              University maybe was the perfect match for you, and you may struggle to see why anyone would want to go down any other route or forgo institutionalised education entirely, in favour of self-education.

              I personally know of a lot of people who attended university and now regret it - for various reasons - and would maybe not thank you for that advice in much the same way as they're not thanking their parents for it, right now. :p

              Some went hoping to increase career prospects / earnings potential, others went because they just wanted to learn, and others went to because they wanted to drink beer and get laid and -- well, that's pretty much all -- for as long as possible.

              Strangely enough, the second was the most popular reason given by them. But they quickly discovered, upon landing there, that the "system" as it is devised didn't much suit them and their method of learning, and (in some cases) they despised the constraints of academic writing ... among other things.

              It turned out to be a bit of a drag. And they were all pretty adamant, before attending, that university would be AWESOME.

              They spent so much time being bored and frustrated that, come graduation (for those who stuck at it), they'd not only severely underutilised their capabilities and were awarded second-rate degrees, but have since struggled to find ways of justifying all the time and financial outlay they'd endured to be there.

              Also, by my own observations - but also by their own confession, in some cases - much of this "other stuff" that university education can instil within you simply isn't there. They're no different.

              Why? Probably, quite simply, because they weren't academic and weren't receptive to it. And no amount of "trying to be" would make them so. None of the stuff you're talking about was there to begin with, and so there was nothing to hone. Nothing to build upon to begin with.

              They can learn the ins and outs of a subject quite easily, and they might be an electrical engineer or a self-employed fitness trainer and make some good money, but don't think you'll ever have a reasonable debate with them down the pub. They're pretty closed-minded, contrived, not too analytical or questioning of "fact", and not in the slightest bit philosophical.

              And it seems to me that there are, these days, many more people going to university who are exactly like that. It's simply not a good match for them.
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        • Profile picture of the author paulie888
          Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

          Some people imagine so, yes. The places where many others typically learn a different, rather broader and more open-minded way of looking at it are called universities and colleges.
          I wonder sometimes if these naysayers have even attended college, because it really isn't as career-focused as they're making it out to be. You should be getting a decent and broad-based general education curriculum with lots of opportunities to take elective classes (during your first two years) at any decent four year college or university here in the US, and I'd suspect elsewhere also.

          College or university is not a "trade school" or "polytechnic" type institution that only equips you for a specific career, so these naysayers really shouldn't be making broad assumptions about what they will or will not learn there.
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          • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
            Banned
            Originally Posted by paulie888 View Post

            I wonder sometimes if these naysayers have even attended college
            I commend you on being more open-minded than I am on that particular aspect of the subject, Paulie. I know I'm not going to make myself any friends by admitting it, but I tend to guess that they never have, and what's presented, usually, is largely an attempted post facto justification of that, perhaps mostly addressed to themselves and/or seeking support from like-minded others. I shouldn't guess, and I may occasionally be wrong about that guess, I know.

            But I don't remember hearing many people say "I wish I hadn't stayed on at college/university and graduated". Occasionally, yes; but clearly and understandably one hears the opposite far more often.

            Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

            college graduates start off with a $80k debt
            Maybe in about 1% of the world's countries. I've actually never met a graduate with anything like that amount of "student debt" (I don't live in America). :p
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            • Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              But I don't remember hearing many people say "I wish I hadn't stayed on at college/university and graduated". Occasionally, yes; but clearly and understandably one hears the opposite far more often.
              Well, here you have one fellow who completed a full 5-year degree and who sincerely wishes he hadnt, in order to pursue his traveling and entrepreneurial ventures much earlier.
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              • Profile picture of the author Alexa Smith
                Banned
                Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

                Well, here you have one fellow who completed a full 5-year degree and who sincerely wishes he hadnt, in order to pursue his entrepreneurial ventures much earlier.
                Fair enough - I acknowledge and accept that, AA, of course. I also respectfully suggest that it puts you in a very small minority. I'm surrounded by recent university graduates (being one myself) and have never heard this before in my life.
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                • Profile picture of the author paulie888
                  Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

                  Fair enough - I acknowledge and accept that, AA, of course. I also respectfully suggest that it puts you in a very small minority. I'm surrounded by recent university graduates (being one myself) and have never heard this before in my life.
                  Alexa, neither have I....until now, that is!
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            • Profile picture of the author paulie888
              Originally Posted by Alexa Smith View Post

              I commend you on being more open-minded than I am on that particular aspect of the subject, Paulie. I know I'm not going to make myself any friends by admitting it, but I tend to guess that they never have, and what's presented, usually, is largely an attempted post facto justification of that, perhaps mostly addressed to themselves and/or seeking support from like-minded others. I shouldn't guess, and I may occasionally be wrong about that guess, I know.

              But I don't remember hearing many people say "I wish I hadn't stayed on at college/university and graduated". Occasionally, yes; but clearly and understandably one hears the opposite far more often.
              Alexa, I was just trying to give them the benefit of the doubt, but from the way that the majority of them are posting here, I'd venture to say that many haven't even stepped foot in a college before. I have encountered many people in real life that have this "chip on the shoulder" type mentality where they try incredibly hard to overcompensate for the lack of a college education, and it only calls more attention to that fact in many cases.

              You're definitely right about people "regretting" having gone to college/university - I believe I haven't heard that line yet from anyone I've encountered!

              Paul
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              • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
                Originally Posted by paulie888 View Post

                You're definitely right about people "regretting" having gone to college/university - I believe I haven't heard that line yet from anyone I've encountered!
                Might it be possible, though, that the reason behind few people (in yours and Alexa's case) confessing that they feel college/university failed them is the same reasoning behind people's reluctance to admit and/or talk about any other failings or bad decisions they've made in life? :p

                It's the same for people on both sides of the fence, anyway.

                People who made the decision to attend college/uni may look for ways to justify it, and speak from a positively pro-university standpoint ... perhaps even if, inside, they don't feel that way.

                Those who didn't attend, rather often, will look for ways to justify that and may be more likely to try to denounce the benefits of a college/university education ... even if they can internally recognise and appreciate its benefits.

                Both might feel regret for their decision one way or another, but it wouldn't be unreasonable to imagine that feelings of insecurity prohibit a large number of them from being vocal about it.

                But, since the argument is weighted in favour of those who did choose to go 'not complaining about it', I will say this:

                Might one's upbringing and/or background and/or personality further compound their decision over whether to "remain silent" or "be vocal" about their regrets?

                Do you not find there's a distinct correlation between privileged and/or gifted and/or successful individuals and a stronger reluctance to admit to their failings and insecurities, or otherwise make a mockery of themselves? The more pride one has in oneself, or the greater someone's reputation, the "more to lose" by doing so?

                Which, conversely, might possibly explain why I - coming from a somewhat poor, destitute city full of poor, underprivileged people who are accustomed to others giving them flak - encounter quite a number of individuals who are readily prepared to admit to their feelings of regret at having attended university. It's not a problem for them - they're used to being slandered, scoffed at and ridiculed. They wouldn't feel any shame that they haven't felt before. They're not too proud to second-guess or ridicule themselves, is what I'm saying.

                I'm just making the point that whereas yourself and Alexa (and maybe others) are implying that non-attendees who denounce the merits of higher education only do so out of insecurity, it's also possible that attendees who remain silent about their regrets do so purely to preserve their own dignity?

                Just my thoughts, anyway.
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                • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
                  Banned
                  Originally Posted by DireStraits View Post

                  I'm just making the point that whereas yourself and Alexa (and maybe others) are implying that non-attendees who denounce the merits of higher education only do so out of insecurity, it's also possible that attendees who remain silent about their regrets do so purely to preserve their own dignity?
                  Michael, I can't quite see how it's possible to denounce something without either empirical evidence or firsthand experience.

                  One can denounce smoking without having smoked, for example, because the empirical data is readily available proving its negative impact on health.

                  In the case of higher education, it's not simply a matter of judging whether or not the 2 or 4 years or more were (or would be) worth it, but also the experience and benefits it brings over a lifetime of putting that education to use.

                  While I can appreciate and do know a few folks that regret not working harder in university or perhaps regretted not pursuing different majors, I've never met one who regretted attending.

                  In my corporate days, it seemed like everyone of my colleagues were taking classing and working towards post graduate degrees. No one forced them to - they chose to for career enhancement or personal goals.

                  The web has made large scale ecommerce a reality, which in turn lent itself to IM being possible in the first place. So the question begs...

                  Would the opportunities IM present even be possible without all those folks before us who "Wasted" their time going to college?
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                  • Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

                    In the case of higher education, it's not simply a matter of judging whether or not the 2 or 4 years or more were (or would be) worth it, but also the experience and benefits it brings over a lifetime of putting that education to use.
                    I seriously wonder what those "lifetime experiences" you refer to, to be honest. You make it sound like people get, somehow, enlightened in a mystical way during their university years. I personally experienced NONE of that: other than studying outdated crap that bared no connection whatsoever to the real world, all I did during my college years was partying and drinking with my pals. And guess what: you don't need to go to college for that!

                    In fact, I got WAY more enlightened during my backpacking years around the world. Now THAT was a true lifetime experience...
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                    • Profile picture of the author Zabrina
                      Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

                      I seriously wonder what those "lifetime experiences" you refer to, to be honest. You make it sound like people get, somehow, enlightened in a mystical way during their university years. I personally experienced NONE of that: other than studying outdated crap that bared no connection whatsoever to the real world, all I did during my college years was partying and drinking with my pals.
                      Hmm... I can't help but say something. What you get out of university is proportionate to what you put in. :rolleyes: If you'd applied the attitude, beliefs, and engagement you had when backpacking to university, might it have been different?
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                      • Profile picture of the author myob
                        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.

                        - H. G. Wells
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                        “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton
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                    • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
                      Banned
                      Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

                      I seriously wonder what those "lifetime experiences" you refer to, to be honest. You make it sound like people get, somehow, enlightened in a mystical way during their university years. I personally experienced NONE of that: other than studying outdated crap that bared no connection whatsoever to the real world, all I did during my college years was partying and drinking with my pals. And guess what: you don't need to go to college for that!

                      In fact, I got WAY more enlightened during my backpacking years around the world. Now THAT was a true lifetime experience...
                      Firstly, you're misquoting me and you're still putting this in the context of your 5 years of university. I'm placing this in the context of the hardcore experience gained over 30 plus years of putting that education to work for me- experience I would not have gained without the degrees earned.

                      Just because you're dissatisfied with your education and wasted your time there doesn't make it true for everyone else.
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                      • Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

                        you're still putting this in the context of your 5 years of university.

                        Just because you're dissatisfied with your education and wasted your time there doesn't make it true for everyone else.
                        That's obvious. We all build our opinions based on our own respective experiences, which is why everyone's opinions are different. The point is not whether our opinions are exclusively personal (which goes without saying). The point is to defend our respective points of view with solid arguments.
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                        • Profile picture of the author myob
                          Experience is a good school. But the fees are high.

                          - Heinrich Heine
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                          “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” – Isaac Newton
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                      • Profile picture of the author paulie888
                        Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

                        Firstly, you're misquoting me and you're still putting this in the context of your 5 years of university. I'm placing this in the context of the hardcore experience gained over 30 plus years of putting that education to work for me- experience I would not have gained without the degrees earned.

                        Just because you're dissatisfied with your education and wasted your time there doesn't make it true for everyone else.
                        As with anything else in life, what you get out of university/college is equal to what you put into it. If you spent your college years hating every minute of it and deeming it a waste of time, it's almost assured that you'll gain nothing out of the experience. If you continue with this line of thinking and remain disillusioned about those experiences and what you got out of them after you left college, it'll again be more of a burden and regret than an asset.

                        The mind's a powerful thing - how you react to your life experiences, in college or elsewhere, ultimately determines what you get out of it.

                        Paul
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                  • Profile picture of the author DireStraits
                    Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

                    Michael, I can't quite see how it's possible to denounce something without either empirical evidence or firsthand experience.

                    One can denounce smoking without having smoked, for example, because the empirical data is readily available proving its negative impact on health.

                    In the case of higher education, it's not simply a matter of judging whether or not the 2 or 4 years or more were (or would be) worth it, but also the experience and benefits it brings over a lifetime of putting that education to use.

                    While I can appreciate and do know a few folks that regret not working harder in university or perhaps regretted not pursuing different majors, I've never met one who regretted attending.

                    In my corporate days, it seemed like everyone of my colleagues were taking classing and working towards post graduate degrees. No one forced them to - they chose to for career enhancement or personal goals.

                    The web has made large scale ecommerce a reality, which in turn lent itself to IM being possible in the first place. So the question begs...

                    Would the opportunities IM present even be possible without all those folks before us who "Wasted" their time going to college?
                    Of course not, Mike.

                    But the web was created by academics. So was Google. My argument is that not everyone is inclined to be academic, and not everyone will be made to be academic.

                    Yes, there is a link between academia and innovation and so on. And attending university is often the logical and popular choice for/of these people.

                    Is there an intrinsic link between success (in any form) and institutionalised education, or is that link actually between those who are intelligent, inquisitive and driven and probably always were long before then ... and who, for pretty obvious reasons, decided to go pursue a higher education on that basis?


                    Is it not possible that these high-flying academics who go on to achieve so much were already far more gifted, innovative and forward-thinking than the average person? Or must all the achievements of successful, formally educated people be credited to the gifts of these 'magical' and (once upon a time) exclusive institutions?

                    I'm not denouncing the merits of formal higher education, myself, nor what good has come of many who undergo it. I'm simply disputing this notion that it's right for everyone, or even anywhere close to "most people".

                    As Zabrina pointed out above: what you get out (to an extent) is proportionate to what you put in.

                    So it isn't it possible that if some of these bored, regretful university students failed to absorb the knowledge imparted by their books, lecturers/teachers and peers - and indeed the overall "university experience" - these mystical "hidden benefits" didn't get instilled within them, too?

                    Or does the successful absorption of this 'hidden, secret wisdom' somehow not require the need for effort and receptivity on the part of the recipient?

                    If subject-knowledge can fall on deaf ears, so too so can other valuable lessons. No?

                    Having said all that, one of my friends is at university right now, approaching graduation (and I've no doubt he'll receive either a 2:1 or a 1:1 or whatever - a decent "grade"), and he was the most likely candidate, out of many I know, to have taken well to university study.

                    Nope. Hates it. Loathes it, even. Finds the whole thing oppressive and boring. Just about the only positive thing he credits it with is the doors it's opened for him to meet other people with similar interests. It helped with that, but it wasn't necessary, of course.

                    He will say himself that it's done nothing for him beyond further his knowledge a little bit on his chosen subject - for which he's lost a lot of passion, apparently, since studying at university. Are you going to tell him "don't worry, son, it has done more for you than you can possibly ever know", and expect him to take that well, or take you seriously?

                    I agree, once again, that university (or education in general) is more than just about the study of your chosen field, partying, beer, sex, and better career/earnings prospects. But if the person him/herself doesn't feel it has planted the seeds of change or enlightenment within them, who the heck is anyone else to argue otherwise? :p

                    They should know how they feel. And next in line to make a judgement are those who have known them for a long time (close friends/family).

                    If it's worked magic for you - great!

                    This debate, however, like so many others, seems to me to be dominated by people with an emotional (or other form of) incentive to maintain their stance and perpetuate it to others.

                    If discussions of politics were allowed here, you'd have the same thing. And people on both sides of the argument would be right to believe what they believe. Because there are no definitively correct or incorrect answers to a lot of things in life. But that doesn't stop individuals with strong beliefs trying to inflict them upon - or justify them to - others.

                    I'm afraid university isn't magic, and it's only one way of getting an education. You can self-educate. You can network. You can read. You can hang around with those who you judge to be "successful" and "enlightened". You can live.

                    It's good for some people, to varying degrees; for others it's completely wrong and not helpful in the slightest.

                    One can make the case of "how many people it's good/better for" based on the feelings expressed by others (or by one's own feelings) in an attempt to cast it in a superior light, but, as I've pointed out in my previous post, there are all kinds of incentives for people to be vocal or otherwise remain silent about their choices in life. Heck, some people are even prepared to spew complete lies just to justify them.

                    No conclusions can be drawn from this debate because of the inherent bias of people on both sides of the fence, plus the fact there's no way to accurately measure the extent of any positive effects university education has had on people, nor indeed on how many.
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          • Originally Posted by paulie888 View Post

            I wonder sometimes if these naysayers have even attended college
            So you dont believe it's actually possible that someone might not deem those 4 or 5 years of full-time studying worth it?
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            • Profile picture of the author paulie888
              Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

              So you dont believe it's actually possible that someone might not deem those 4 or 5 years of full-time studying worth it?
              I never expressed that opinion, all I was stating is that it seems many are making broad assumptions before even knowing what they would actually study in college/university.
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  • Profile picture of the author Coby
    Probably the wrong advice...

    but I left college after completing 2 and 1/2 years because it got in the way of my IM business...

    I don't regret it.... Yet anways, lol

    Good Luck
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  • You should always consider going to college.

    Even if you don't want to go because it will give you a back up when time are though.
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  • As a student who is just finishing a degree, literally, I can give you a good prospective on this...

    College isn't just about the subject matter itself, it's also about developing you as a person. I can honestly say I've come out a much more effective and efficient person.

    One of the best pieces of advice I can give you is to know yourself, know what your strengths are. Mix your strengths with your dreams, add a bit of knowledge to this and you have a great formula for success.

    College is an opportunity for development, however you have to ask yourself the question: Is it right for you?

    College can open the door to higher paid jobs and give you a shortcut in life. But are you the type of person who wants to start off lower down and work your way up?

    Be aware of who you are, be aware of your strengths and weaknesses and decide whether this is an opportunity you want to take or if it's just a period of laziness?

    Good luck!
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  • Profile picture of the author Macksheppard
    College will teach you how to be a good employee. If you are an entrepreneur than you don't need a degree.
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  • Profile picture of the author David Lamb
    It doesn't have to be an all-or-nothing decision.

    Set a goal for making enough money in IM to live on by the end of the summer. If you make it, take a one-year hiatus from school and set another financial goal in IM. If you don't make it, finish your AA and try IM full-time again the following summer.

    It's always good to have a goal and a backup plan if you don't make it.
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    • Profile picture of the author paulie888
      Originally Posted by David Lamb View Post

      It doesn't have to be an all-or-nothing decision.

      Set a goal for making enough money in IM to live on by the end of the summer. If you make it, take a one-year hiatus from school and set another financial goal in IM. If you don't make it, finish your AA and try IM full-time again the following summer.

      It's always good to have a goal and a backup plan if you don't make it.
      I agree, it doesn't have to be an "either-or" type of proposition. As you probably already know, becoming a successful entrepreneur isn't exactly a sure thing, and failure rates are high.

      What I'd suggest is remaining in college and doing your IM on the side until it generates you substantial and consistent job-replacing type income. Give yourself some leeway here and work on your business until you see some results occurring. You don't want the unthinkable to happen, and discover later that you don't really want to continue being an entrepreneur.

      Even Bill Gates and Michael Dell didn't just drop out of college on a whim - they only did this after their respective businesses took off. They didn't gamble their lives away by dropping out of college just because they felt like it, they made very rational decisions in choosing to do so.
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  • BTW, as someone who has directly hired literally dozens, if not hundreds, of employees at various levels throughout my career, I can tell you that I can think of absolutely no instance in which I discounted an applicant because they lacked a degree. My hiring philosophy isn't based on how much time a person spent in school, but rather on their ability to demonstrate to me through experience and their face-to-face interview just exactly what they have done, what they can do, and what they have experienced.

    There's a lot to think about when making such decisions, but there's one thing I will tell you with absolute certainty: if I were hiring and I had one position and two applicants, and Applicant A had graduated college with a four-year degree but lacked any real experience and Applicant B had no degree but had spent four years running his own business (successfully or not), the choice for me would be incredibly simple. Applicant B would rank head and shoulders over Applicant A.
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  • Profile picture of the author MrDay
    How successful are you with internet marketing currently and how fast are you picking it up?

    I know several people who've dropped out of college and are really successful online now. But they were already making pretty good money online and knew IM was something they really wanted to pursue completely before they dropped out.

    It's not for everyone. I think you should think about it for awhile before you make a final decision and decide to dropout of college.
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  • Profile picture of the author Ernie Lo
    In all honesty I'd start working fulltime asap and save as much as you can and invest as much as you can. BE SMART WITH YOUR MONEY! Plus try and make some money online and if you do this while you're young, you'll be way way way ahead of everyone else, even those with a degree. Since you are not my child its a lot easier to give this advice.

    Of course things may not work out but unless you are super smart and want to be a doctor or other high paying profession, you're better of skipping uni and work right now because the old way of going to school, uni, getting a guranteed good job after uni is old, stale and irrelevant these days.

    Stay out of unnecessary debt, save, invest and dont buy a sports car and no credit cards, hold off on the overly expensive holidays and set yourself up by the time you're 25/30 and youll be having the time of your life while others work a 9to5 job and struggle with their big fancy house until they are old and grey.

    Whatever you decide be sure and remember life rarely goes as planned so be prepared for the worst too.

    Just my 2 cents.
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  • Profile picture of the author BR2rivera
    College is a good experience for some and a waste of time for others. See how things are going for you, redirect your goals and priorities always considering the future. Keeping a mindset goal and working you way towards will help.

    Learning and expanding your understanding is essential and should not be taken lightly, what you use your time learning should be an important step in your life.

    Now figure out what you want to do, the ways to accomplish it and what you need to do to make it a reality and go from there. If its taking a business course at a college or getting a technical course to better your understanding of web design or programming etc.

    Just remember that having a teacher or someone that has experience in the field or subject guiding you is always going to be the fastest way to learn. Out of all the sites i have seen Warrior forum is the best for IM guidance and help.

    Hope i was of some help
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    • Profile picture of the author advertisethis
      A business degree still opens up more opportunities for networking and greater likelihood of accessing additional seed capital when an idea requires it. That seems to be the main value to someone who is entrepreneurally focused.

      A business degree should also provide you with job opportunities to fall back on down the road should circumstances related to your business aspirations change unfavorably (like Amazon affiliate state bans or Google slaps, algorithm changes, laws being revamped, etc.).
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    • Profile picture of the author hashif16
      Getting degree is useful in my opinion..
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    • Profile picture of the author dayafterstore
      A HUGE list of people who were high school or college dropouts. This page is just for people whose names begin with the letter "A":
      www . collegedropoutshalloffame . com (not allowed to link directly)
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    • Profile picture of the author khut
      I think it's much harder to motivate yourself to go to college as you get older. I would stick with it while your young, and as some others mentioned maybe find some classes that you will be more interested in.
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  • Profile picture of the author Bruce99
    so many opinions, so little time.
    it is true that at 18 you probably dont know fully what you want to do, hey you did ask the question ... but if you do a uni degree associated with something that you love, you can always fall back on it later.

    Yep that sounds lame, but if you look at the unemployment stats, and see that most jobs require some kind of qualification, it would be really remiss not to recommend anything else.

    if you were completely entrepreneurial and had IM already figured out, you would probably be making great money from it right now and wouldnt be asking the question. Either way, IM isnt always the pancea that many snake oil sales people tell you, and it cant hurt to have a qualification, a bricks and mortor business AND be great at IM.

    Life for most people is about keeping their options open and doing what you love while making money.
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    • Profile picture of the author samykim
      A college degree is only necessary if you know exactly what your college degree will do for you and how you'll benefit from it.

      Too many of my friends have degrees and are either now still working the same job they had during college or trying for their masters so that they can get a better job.

      If it's a skilled profession, like doctor, lawyer, engineer, then yes, you'll need the degree because the education is needed to qualify but then again, what kind of person do you want to be? An employee? Self-employee? Business owner? Investor?

      I think being the investor would be the best but everybody has to start somewhere, and starting as a business owner or a self-employee would be the fastest track to making money, and no faster place than online.

      Of course it comes with a steep learning curve but more than the difficulty level, I think persistence is key.

      As for myself, I dropped out of college and I'm never going back. Universities were made to pump out "workers" which means, when coming out of the university, you're not going to be owning a business, because finishing a university isn't a requirement to start a business.

      Just start and keep going with IM, don't give up, learn from your mistakes, cut out what's slowing you down and add whatever will give you more leverage.

      In the world of business, we learn from making mistakes and grow from them. Universities punish those that make mistakes and tells you to try again until you get it right. Business allows people to work together for the "test" in life, ie. product launches, starting new sites, etc. and university exams are done by yourself, and you're not allowed to ask anyone anything because that is called cheating.

      The more I think about it, no. College degree is not necessary. In fact, I would say, unless your dream is to become a doctor, lawyer, engineer, architect, etc. going to university will hurt you.

      I say learn from those that DO what they're teaching.
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      • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
        Banned
        Originally Posted by samykim View Post

        I say learn from those that DO what they're teaching.
        In that case, I'd definitely go back to university and do it all over again!

        The bit I quoted in red is probably the single biggest misnomer made about college professors. The expression, "Those that can, do and those that can't, teach", was probably made up by someone who dropped out .

        Firstly, take a look at some of the salaries of just state university staff:

        Virginia Tech Public Salaries - Public Salaries Database - CollegiateTimes.com

        I picked VT because they're pretty much middle of the road both in programs offered and compensation. How many people do you know who didn't go to university regularly qualify for and are compensated for jobs like these.

        How many IM'ers do you really think are pulling in even the low-end earnings each year? There is no comparison...period.

        Let me mention something else no one seems to have brought up - the underlying reason many of these folks teach is because it gives them the time and facilities to pursue their own research, writing, etc.

        Any idea how many college professors are published or hold patents? Any idea of how much money they actually earn from their pet projects? The technologies they license to 3rd parties? Hell, can anybody guess how much they earn just for speaking engagements annually?

        LOL...trust me - they are doing it and far more successfully than the typical Internet marketer. And I'll bet you dollars to donuts not a one of them ever had trouble with the FTC, hehehehehe.

        I'll stand on my original comments that while a college degree is not absolutely necessary for IM, I think you're better off with one.
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        • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
          Originally Posted by BIG Mike View Post

          Let me mention something else no one seems to have brought up - the underlying reason many of these folks teach is because it gives them the time and facilities to pursue their own research, writing, etc.

          Any idea how many college professors are published or hold patents? Any idea of how much money they actually earn from their pet projects? The technologies they license to 3rd parties? Hell, can anybody guess how much they earn just for speaking engagements annually?

          Hey Mike,

          When I was in college, one of the chemistry professors was a former
          Dupont researcher who held a patent for something famous, don't remember.
          Nylon... something "lon." lol

          He was a millionaire, profit sharing from the patent, loved teaching and doing
          research. All the students loved his classses because he made engineering
          chemistry fun; demanding, but fun. He always had a smile on his face.

          I took the same class with another professor who did ongoing research at
          Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago, I think that's where it is. A Chinese
          guy, he loved teaching and research. I used to go to his office and we would
          talk about chemistry and everything else. He always made time for me.

          I took philosophy classes taught by a Jesuit priest who had a reputation for
          being a hardass. But he was cool. I used to visit him, too, and we would talk
          for hours about philosophy and everything else. And he was funny as hell!

          My sister is a professor and published author. She looks forward to summers
          when she can travel, research and work on books. She gets research grants
          to do that. She loves it.

          All of those things that people don't think about. Being able to talk to highly
          educated, bright people who "do," but they also teach because they love
          doing it. Conversations with people like that are priceless.

          I say, go to school and never stop.


          Ken
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          • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
            Banned
            Originally Posted by KenThompson View Post

            Hey Mike,

            When I was in college, one of the chemistry professors was a former
            Dupont researcher who held a patent for something famous, don't remember.
            Nylon... something "lon." lol

            He was a millionaire, profit sharing from the patent, loved teaching and doing
            research. All the students loved his classses because he made engineering
            chemistry fun; demanding, but fun. He always had a smile on his face.

            I took the same class with another professor who did ongoing research at
            Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago, I think that's where it is. A Chinese
            guy, he loved teaching and research. I used to go to his office and we would
            talk about chemistry and everything else. He always made time for me.

            I took philosophy classes taught by a Jesuit priest who had a reputation for
            being a hardass. But he was cool. I used to visit him, too, and we would talk
            for hours about philosophy and everything else. And he was funny as hell!

            My sister is a professor and published author. She looks forward to summers
            when she can travel, research and work on books. She gets research grants
            to do that. She loves it.

            All of those things that people don't think about. Being able to talk to highly
            educated, bright people who "do," but they also teach because they love
            doing it
            . Conversations with people like that are priceless.

            I say, go to school and never stop.


            Ken
            Great post Ken - everything you described is exactly what the naysayers just don't seem to get.

            And you bring up an excellent point I neglected to mention...their passion for teaching. It's one of the things that kept me motivated to stay in school and go back again and again.
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    • Profile picture of the author tjc348
      I am 20 years old, and I found myself asking the same question. I have been studying the IM business for about four months, and I am just now starting to put together a campaign. I am going to college for my associates degree in business and I am determined to make a living with IM. I am already four months away from getting my degree so at this point I am not going to quit. Plus, if I don't finish school, I will feel like somewhat of a failure.

      I suggest that you stick through it until you get your AA degree because if all else fails, you will always have your degree to help you get a job. I am the same way though,I don't ever want to work a full time job for the rest of my life either. That is why I am going to dedicate myself to IM 100%.

      Of course it is not necessary to have a degree in order to be successful, especially in IM because you work for yourself. What you put into it is what you will get out of it, I have realized that much. Don't give up on what you are doing. Switch your degree to something that will benefit you in IM: E-commerce, business management, web design etc.

      Good luck with everything, hope my advice was helpful.
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    • Profile picture of the author Alan Allport
      If you're not yet making anything like a fulltime income from your IM activities then it may be worth your while continuing with your college education until you complete your course and do your IM thing in your spare time - but I suggest that you try to get on college courses that you are actually interested in and that, therefore, have some personal value to you.

      In answer to the wider question - no, you do not need a college degree. As others have already said, the IM stuff doesn't tend to be taught in college, you have to learn it by doing it thus giving you real world experience to draw on - the very best education you can have.

      College degrees in general are designed to give you the skills needed to live life as an employee, not the independence you get as an Internet marketer.

      A final piece of advice. Think long and hard about what it is you really want to do and go with what your heart tells you.

      Best wishes whatever you decide.

      Alan
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    • Profile picture of the author BrendanRa
      There is a reason people say college is the best 4 years of your life...because if you have the right mind set, it's true.

      I honestly hate when people question college mainly because no matter how mature or grown up you feel, an 18 year old belongs in a place of learning surrounded by people their own age creating experiences that will be unforgettable.

      Regardless of what you want to do or where you want to be in your life, going to college is something everyone SHOULD want to experience, because it is fantastic.

      If I could do it over again, I wouldn't change a thing...go to college and go full time, live on campus, meet a ton of people, make those years special.
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  • Profile picture of the author mikeroosa
    I recommend getting a college education. There is probably going to be a time in your life when you need to find a job and that education is going to come in handy. It doesn't mean you are any smarter than someone without a degree, but some employers really do require that piece of paper.
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    • Profile picture of the author im1217
      100% agree. IM is NOT consistent and takes a long time to build up your biz. Even after you build up your biz, ONE Google slap can destroy it. If you have a college education, you will get respect and open a lot more doors.

      Originally Posted by mikeroosa View Post

      I recommend getting a college education. There is probably going to be a time in your life when you need to find a job and that education is going to come in handy. It doesn't mean you are any smarter than someone without a degree, but some employers really do require that piece of paper.
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  • I would take some web design classes or technical writing classes if they are available, they will help in IM.

    As far as college being necessary for IM, I don't think it is. I have learned more from this forum in a year, than I hav learned the last 5 years. I also have a subscription to Lynda.com and that is where I learn wordpress, seo, dreamweaver, etc.

    I don't think you need a college degree, but you do need the discipline to see things through and to finish what you start.
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  • Profile picture of the author Trent Brownrigg
    You don't need a college degree to be successful in IM or business in general. I have three degrees (two bachelor, one associates) in two different fields of study (marketing and criminology) and I would have been just as successful with my internet marketing business without them. However, I am very happy that I went to college. The experience was amazing and I have something to fall back on if ever needed.
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    • Profile picture of the author paulie888
      Originally Posted by Trent Brownrigg View Post

      You don't need a college degree to be successful in IM or business in general. I have three degrees (two bachelor, one associates) in two different fields of study (marketing and criminology) and I would have been just as successful with my internet marketing business without them. However, I am very happy that I went to college. The experience was amazing and I have something to fall back on if ever needed.
      Exactly, even though I also have three degrees and know that I would probably be just as successful today without them, it's the experiences, networking, interaction and expansion of one's consciousness and knowledge that are invaluable parts of the university experience. Life's not all about making money, is it?

      I know of at least several successful six figure marketers who chose to go to university even though they didn't absolutely need it. I wouldn't turn my back on the whole university experience if I had to do it all over again myself.
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  • Profile picture of the author WebPen
    A degree is definitely not necessary- I know a there are a number of 6 or 7 figure guys without one.
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  • Profile picture of the author alex87
    Well my idea is that it's always better to have something on paper rather than not. You never know how life will work out for you.
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  • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
    As you can see, you aren't going to get a definitive answer here. Every opinion, including mine, will be filtered the the opiner's life experience. Every one of those life experiences will be different than yours.

    Do you need a piece of parchment with some fancy calligraphy on it to succeed?

    Nope.

    Do you need the college experience, the discipline, the learning how to think for yourself, the social interaction, the connections you could make?

    Maybe.

    And it may take more than one shot at it.

    The first time I left school, I was invited to take some time off by the school because my best grades were in frat parties, hangovers and oversleeping. I blew a free ride that time.

    The second and third times I left school, life simply got in the way.

    The fourth time was the charm. I got an engineering degree and, as fate would have it, I've reaped more benefit from the rigor and discipline of the classes and from the structure of the subjects than I did as a working engineer.

    Take the stories here for what they are worth. If you stay in school or if you leave, do it for your own reasons, not because you don't like your classes or because some stranger on an online forum told you what you should do based on their lives rather than yours.

    I wish you luck...
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  • Profile picture of the author GalenaEd
    A college degree is necessary to enter certain fields. I needed a degree to become a teacher. I now take courses only in areas that I am interested in or can help me.

    I have met many successful people in Internet Marketing and NONE of them have bragged about what college they attended or even if they went to college. In certain fields (law for example), the school you attended is far more importat than what you learned.

    Later in life, if you find a degree is necessary - you can return to college. For now, be honest and ethical, and treat your customers well.
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  • Profile picture of the author LauraH
    Banned
    A college degree is only necessary if you fail with internet marketing and never make a lot of money with it. It takes time to learn what works and what doesn't work. I think college is good if you want to work 9-5 or have someone control how much you make. There is a higher chance that you will make more money with a college degree than without one. This only applies if you are looking for a real job. However, if you want to control your life and develop a business, a college degree isn't going to do much for you. I think all a human being needs is a high school education at most. That's enough intelligence to have a successful life.
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    • Profile picture of the author im1217
      Now, we all know why you got banned.

      "I think all a human being needs is a high school education at most. That's enough intelligence to have a successful life."





      Originally Posted by LauraH View Post

      A college degree is only necessary if you fail with internet marketing and never make a lot of money with it. It takes time to learn what works and what doesn't work. I think college is good if you want to work 9-5 or have someone control how much you make. There is a higher chance that you will make more money with a college degree than without one. This only applies if you are looking for a real job. However, if you want to control your life and develop a business, a college degree isn't going to do much for you. I think all a human being needs is a high school education at most. That's enough intelligence to have a successful life.
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  • Profile picture of the author Kael41
    Plus if anything college institutes and reinforces time management skills..those same skills I apply today online AND applied 10 years ago as an active attorney. It's all in what you put into your experience and what your expectations are.
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  • Profile picture of the author Mike Parkin
    Its a big bad world out here - arm yourself with everything you can
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  • Profile picture of the author funkdoctor
    Best advice I can give you from my own personal experience (as a junior in college)

    - yes college will help you A LOT in getting a well-paying day job

    - you really DON'T need a college degree to have the skills to create a successful business. in fact, there are so many "sheep" in college that i almost feel it's mostly politics. well, that and information generally unapplicable to the real world. (i'd say maybe 1/4 of my classes have really taught me something valuable)

    You'll learn a ton from your own experiences, however you NEED to realize that YOU WILL FAIL. You're almost definitely going to have to lose some money doing things the wrong way to realize how to fix them to the "right" way (aka one that makes you money).

    The other thing is that there's no "magic bullet". Most opportunities that are "easy" to make money are quickly saturated and don't last very long. That's not really a bad thing though.. if it was that easy competition would be through the roof.

    You're gonna hafta keep trying new things to get your website where it needs to be, and what works in one niche on one website might not work in another niche (or even the same niche) on your website.

    One last thing.. the summer is approaching. I HIGHLY suggest that you get a day job and work on your business when you have the time. When you've got steady money coming in from a day job, all of your financial decisions for your business will be much easier. Worrying about finances (say you just lost $100 on worthless advertising), will bring you to your "lower self." A lot of poor financial decisions are made in the lower self, looking for quick fixes that end up hurting you in the long run.

    Good luck! And don't hesitate to send me a PM if you wanna bounce ideas off eachother or need some advice.

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  • Profile picture of the author CapitalSEO
    Y u ned an edumacasion? Just kidding. If you can make tons of cabbage online without going to school for 4 years, then why no bag it? I've got a member in my DL that actually dropped out of high school, (mind you, he is a very intelligent kid), and is telling people "when in high classes I was losing too much money".
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    • Profile picture of the author ajwilliams
      Hi V92,

      I have read many of the replies but not all of them. There is a ton of good advice in these replies. The problem is that the advice falls on both sides of your issue of course as it would because everyone has there opinion.

      I did not go to college. I worked in restaurants for a while and then insurance sales and as an office manager. I started my own business in my twenties.

      over the years I have made a lot of money and I have gone broke a few times as well. I made some good decisions and I made a lot of bad decisions. I can't help but wonder if some of my decisions would have been different had I had the "Broadening Of My Horizons" of a college education or even a couple years under my belt.

      This is your decision to make, good or bad. Meditate on the advice you have been given here and weigh it as best you possibly can. Then Make a decision. One thing I have learned in my many years si that "He Who Hesitates is Lost. Make the decison. Keep studying in college or not.

      Good luck and we are all hoping you make the right choice.

      A J
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      • Profile picture of the author VictorV
        You probably need to switch majors or something. I feel like you're not "doing" college properly because...

        College was the GREATEST time of my life. It's like a giant party, with a few tests every now and then.

        You probably won't remember a damn thing you learn in any of your classes, but that's not what it's about.

        You're in an environment with so many other like-minded individuals with awesome clubs/sports you can join.

        I bet if you networked a bit, you could partner up with some people at your college and get into IM together while still going to class.

        I wish I discovered IM while in college. I probably would have started an IM club if I had known.
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  • Well, it's always good to have something to fall back on just in case you fail in your online business.

    Not everyone succeeds with their own business, and it never hurts to have backup.
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  • Profile picture of the author Henry White
    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
    Higher education is primed and ready to be one of the next bubbles to burst.

    Even if you have to continue in the 9-5 rat race for a while, focus on building your business. Flipping burgers at minimum wage is incentive enough - as we've already seen from students in middle-school, high school, college, AND graduate school!

    One reason the first couple of years of college is chock full of the "core curriculum" is because K-12 is that pathetic - the colleges need this time to bring everyone up to the same level, which is actually being prepared for college work. It varies from school to school and is largely directly related to how competitive they are, but roughly half the entering freshman class also has to take remedial courses in math and/or English.

    Don't blame your teachers! Blame the politicians, teachers' union and the idiots on the school board who each have their personal ax to grind and their pet "solution" - always at everyone else's expense - especially the students and taxpayers!

    Besides, no one has EVER gotten to any the really "good stuff" until graduate school.
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  • Profile picture of the author William King
    I am also 21 not much older and I also don't have a college degree right now and I don't feel I need one. I also jumped in the IM at your age and I was more interested in exploring it rather than starting my own business. When my knowledge was at some respectable level I applied for jobs of internet marketing because I was in need of early money and IM business takes time as you know. After sometime I also jumped into web development and right now doing a professional course of website development. My friends of school are still in college while I am a totally professional person doing a 9 to 5 job and consultation for other companies with some development projects. So I am in much stable position and don't forget I haven't started my own business because of time but I will do it soon. I am on the reasonable postion without any degree.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Ten
    Not always, but quite often it is... perhaps even most often it is.
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  • Profile picture of the author mello87
    Education is very important. It teaches you routine, and it motivates you to keep organised and alert. It depends how you look at it. I went through school, college, and university and i wouldnt change it for the world. The life experiences were absolutely awesome, and im glad i went through the education route. You have to adapt too dont forget, just because you dont have a college education doesnt mean that you cannot succeed. However you will find that most of the successful businessman do have some form of formal education.
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  • Profile picture of the author sketteksalfa
    i think it's necessary!
    all of us know that applying a job without a college degree is difficult for us!!
    although we can get a job but not permanently!!
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  • Profile picture of the author BIG Mike
    Banned
    I think you're really asking the wrong question and I think most of the answers you're getting pro or con relate directly to whether or not the poster went to or finished university.

    Starting a business online or off is a relatively simple thing to do. Building it into a sustainable enterprise that's incredibly successful...well that's a different story altogether.

    There are many successful small businesses around the world that owned and operated by folks who never went to college or finished high school. I suspect most of these are either service or retail oriented for the most part.

    Regardless, no matter how far anyone gets, it boils down to three things:

    Education + Experience + Application

    Over time, as you gain experience, you will also gain the education you need. No, you're not getting it in a classroom or a lecture hall, but you are getting it just the same.

    Whether you spend a few years learning everything about IM on your own or spend that same time in school, it is going to take you time to get there. I know a lot of folks in IM that spent a good 3 or 4 years learning the ropes before they really started earning consistently. About the same amount of time you'd spend in university.

    On the one hand, those folks earned some money, gained some experience and eventually realized their basic goals. On the other hand, they still have gaping holes in their knowledge and understanding of business itself, something the university folks generally have a better grasp of.

    Now for the person who claimed that all the richest people in the world have no college education, I'd sure like to see the data backing up that statement.

    Don't think for a moment that education, regardless of how you get it, ever stops. I've earned 3 degrees, (two post graduate), and am working towards my doctorate, albeit slowly, and am still learning new things every day about business, especially online.

    If you think guys like Bill Gates or Warren Buffet ever stopped learning, or needing to educate themselves, you'd be dead wrong.

    When I made the move online full time, I brought with me years of education and experience that allowed me to get up and running successfully in about six months. Without it, it would have been two or three years at least.

    Do you need a college education to succeed in IM? Absolutely not. Will a college education give you an edge? Absolutely. Who do I think is more likely to become super rich? Those with a solid university education and a willingness to continue to educate themselves by any means necessary.

    If I had to do it all over again? I'd still do it the way I did it...
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  • Profile picture of the author tritrain
    If I were to start all over, without going into the military, I would probably have learned a trade. One that would not be effected by outsourcing, such as a plumber. That, or I would have gone on to get an advanced degree.

    Liberal arts degrees are mostly ineffective in getting you a job. You may be able to move up the corporate ladder with a bachelors, but it is not a guarantee, by any means.

    I guess it really depends on where you want to live, what you see yourself doing (realistically) in 5, 10, 20 years, and how hard you want to work to get it.

    Many of the 9-5 jobs are more about schmoozing and popularity, more than capability and drive. Yes, I'm a little bitter. </end rant>
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  • Profile picture of the author scottlpool2003
    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
    I quit school early because I hated it.

    I went to college and completed an IT course

    I went to university to complete a degree in IT

    I quit university with 6 weeks to go to start a business.

    My advise would be to go get the experience, there's nothing stopping you from working on a business idea while you study.
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  • Profile picture of the author newmovies
    Banned
    i am 21 year old ,doing btech ,this is my 3rd year
    Remember you can do IM anytime in your future
    but this is timefor your studies .
    If you cant stop yourself doing IM ,first of all finish the syllabus of your college and switch on to IM<
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  • Profile picture of the author bitriot
    I would say finish out your 2 year degree if only because it is nice to have a fall back option. I work a great day job while I am learning IM and I couldn't swing it any other way. Part of me feels like the antipathy you have for college may carry over into your IM work.
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  • Profile picture of the author GeorgR.
    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
    Just DO what you like.

    You seem to be motivated to do IM and motivation is very important. Geniuses like Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Mark Zuckerberg, Larry Page etc.etc...they all made billions because they were motivated and did the right thing at the right time (+ LUCK & foresight).

    Has anyone ever asked whether those guys have a college degree? Who cares.
    Some might disagree, but that's what i think. Do YOUR thing.
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    • Profile picture of the author paulie888
      Originally Posted by GeorgR. View Post

      Just DO what you like.

      You seem to be motivated to do IM and motivation is very important. Geniuses like Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Mark Zuckerberg, Larry Page etc.etc...they all made billions because they were motivated and did the right thing at the right time (+ LUCK & foresight).

      Has anyone ever asked whether those guys have a college degree? Who cares.
      Some might disagree, but that's what i think. Do YOUR thing.
      They all attended college though, and many people conveniently overlook the fact that they did not drop out until after they saw their businesses making some headway. Some had already graduated with an undergraduate degree, and were in doctoral programs (such as Larry Page, Sergey Brin and Elon Musk) when they made the decision to drop out.
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  • Profile picture of the author GeorgR.
    100% agree. IM is NOT consistent and takes a long time to build up your biz
    You think that working a 9-5er at company X is "consistent"? Keep on dreaming. IM is not less secure or less consistent.
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    • Profile picture of the author im1217
      Have you been drinking heavily??? 97% of IMers make $0. 100% of college educated folks make way more than that! Have you ever heard anyone say "I have been at this 9-5 job 3 years and have not made a dime"? However in IM I hear that daily.

      Originally Posted by GeorgR. View Post

      You think that working a 9-5er at company X is "consistent"? Keep on dreaming. IM is not less secure or less consistent.
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      • Profile picture of the author myob
        All you need is ignorance and confidence and the success is sure.

        - Mark Twain
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        • Profile picture of the author bl
          Originally Posted by myob View Post

          All you need is ignorance and confidence and the success is sure.

          - Mark Twain
          Not to make fun of the quote but Mark Twain being one of the biggest liars in history is hard to take seriously. However he also embodies this quote so, I guess you have made a valid point.

          Originally Posted by stepiw View Post

          It's not necessary (look at Bill Gate or Mark Zuckerberg), but it's a nice place to meet people.
          Bill gates can't be considered part of this list the man father was loaded and so was he before he went to college. Mark Zuckerberg stole his idea from to other fellow students.

          I understand your point but these are too bad examples.
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          • Profile picture of the author Justin Goff
            Originally Posted by bl View Post


            Bill gates can't be considered part of this list the man father was loaded and so was he before he went to college. Mark Zuckerberg stole his idea from to other fellow students.

            I understand your point but these are too bad examples.

            I think you're assuming too much.

            Just because your parents are loaded, doesn't mean you'll be successful. It certainly helps, but that doesn't mean Bill Gates didn't earn what he has.

            Same thing with Zuckerberg... Whether he stole the idea or not, it took him like 3+ years to get Facebook in a spot where people were really taking notice. 99/100 people could have tried the same thing and never gotten anywhere.

            Having an "idea" is about the easiest part of running the business. Actually executing and making your business profitable is the tough part (which is where family money and a big "idea" really don't matter)

            - Justin
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      • Profile picture of the author Zabrina
        Originally Posted by im1217 View Post

        Have you been drinking heavily??? 97% of IMers make $0. 100% of college educated folks make way more than that! Have you ever heard anyone say "I have been at this 9-5 job 3 years and have not made a dime"? However in IM I hear that daily.
        Ugh. Posts like this make me tear my hair out. 68% of statistics are made up on the spot, and I can tell you with absolute certainty that the unemployment rate for new college grads is not 0%.

        Posts like the one immediately above me... oh, the logic and sensible air about them. Kind of like opening the windows on a beautiful spring day like today...

        For what it's worth, I'm right now doing both. IM pays for my college education, and I get what I want (studying cool subjects) while building a business to support myself after I graduate. No freaking out about finding internships and going to employment fairs and running seven societies...
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  • Profile picture of the author PtJc
    A college degree is necessary. There are people who make a living of IM, i personally do it for extra income. The fact is, you never know what's going to happen, you don't really know how Internet is going to be in 10 years.
    But if you get a college degree you'll have it the rest of your life, nobody is going to take that away from you.
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  • Profile picture of the author OzMan
    have you made boatloads of cash in IM in the last 7 months? If no, keep at it and stay in college and adjust your courses to something you are interested in.
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  • Profile picture of the author shabit87
    As a college senior about to graduate no I do not think a degree is needed to well succeed in this world BUT I do think an education is essential to doing whatever it is you want out of life.

    I think the only exception is when you are needing to go into something that requires a degree and certification like a elementary school teacher in the public school system or a doctor of some sort. Other than that, absolutely not!

    But remember an education is important...but don't think college is the only way to get one ;-)
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  • Profile picture of the author bonk12
    I was in the same position once.

    I had just finished my first year in engineering at the university of Toronto. I hated it, and so I decided if I could make a steady income of at least $3000 a month from IM than I would quit engineering and reapply in a year to marketing.

    I did and it worked out quite well for me, however do not drop out of school if you cannot maintain a steady income before the end of the summer leading into your second year.

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers,

    Steven Patterson
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  • Profile picture of the author lucky777
    Back in the early 1940's when I was a teenager a college degree was necessary if you wanted a good job. Nowadays it's not necessary as there are many more opportunites available. You kids don't realise how fortunate you are
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  • Profile picture of the author O0o0O
    I'd suggest to stay in college and use some of your financial aid money to outsource your website creation and online marketing. By the time you graduate, you should have a good stable income.
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  • Profile picture of the author bl
    I think a college degree is necessary for those who don't come from money. Because a degree will give you certified skills that any employer would respect. It will keep you out of the worst income bracket which is the income people get by working in home health, fast food, and any other non skilled job. You may or may not succeed in IM the way you would like. Why chance it.

    Always have something to fall back on that is 100%. Even if you can't get a job in the field you studied, you will still qualify for a higher paying job than those very low paying jobs. I think the best thing to do is both.

    When you limit yourself, you will be sorry in the end.
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    • Profile picture of the author paulie888
      Originally Posted by bl View Post

      I think a college degree is necessary for those who don't come from money. Because a degree will give you certified skills that any employer would respect. It will keep you out of the worst income bracket which is the income people get by working in home health, fast food, and any other non skilled job. You may or may not succeed in IM the way you would like. Why chance it.

      Always have something to fall back on that is 100%. Even if you can't get a job in the field you studied, you will still qualify for a higher paying job than those very low paying jobs. I think the best thing to do is both.

      When you limit yourself, you will be sorry in the end.
      Exactly, if you have the opportunity to attend college, you don't just drop out on a whim because you don't like classes and/or you are just lazy - that would be a huge mistake.

      There's nothing stopping you from doing IM and studying at the same time. The decision to drop out should not be taken lightly (if you're already attending college). If and when you make significant progress in your IM while still in college, then that is the time to start assessing whether you should drop out - not when you're still new to IM and aren't making any kind of significant and consistent income with it!
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  • Profile picture of the author omk
    A degree isn't necessary, but if you're smart and want to give yourself an edge, it's probably a good idea.

    Who wouldn't want to aquire knowledge?
    The real question you need answered is just how much knowledge you should get and that's really a personal decision.

    There are 4 year degrees, 2 year degrees, Certificate programs, Aprentice programs, Adult Education courses, you get the idea.

    Go with the amount you feel comfortable with and that you think will serve you well. You can always continue your education if you reach a point in life where you feel not having a certain amount hinders you socially and economically. Although what usually happens later on in life, is that you have less time to devote to furthering your education due to financial and family responsibilities.
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  • Profile picture of the author tdj
    No it is not necessary. College grads do make more money, but they are working for someone else. Many are without jobs. Do what you really enjoy. It's not always about the money.
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    • Profile picture of the author kindsvater
      In my view, go to college. There are several comments about how college graduates only work jobs for others.

      That is pure nonsense.

      On the contrary, obtaining a college degree, with everything required to obtain that degree, will put you in a much better position to have your own shop.

      A college degree is not a 'technical' degree where you learn skills for a job. It is much broader. College will also force you to be exposed to a broad range of classes you have never considered, may have dismissed - but which you may find yourself completely fascinated with.

      "IM" is not a career unless one is teaching IM. Instead, IM is a TOOL. That's it.

      A tool used to make money, such as selling products. But what are going to sell?

      Those classes you become fascinated with - excellent opportunities to later use your IM skills to sell in. Then its not a job. Heckuva lot of fun to research, write, and create something you're interested in - and at the same time being able to sell it to others.

      And, as a parent would say, you're only 18. There's also a reason why not only do college graduates, on AVERAGE, make more money, but for every example of a financially successful person who did not attend college - you will find thousands of finally successful people who did attend college - and thousands of poorer folk who did not and later in life regret their youthful decision.

      FYI - I have a daughter in high school, almost your age and in your position. Home discussion about colleges has nothing to do with her getting a job. Frankly, I don't want her to have a job. And her daily role model is me - someone who no longer goes into an office each day. I see college is a means to making the dream of personal freedom more likely to occur.
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  • Profile picture of the author stepiw
    It's not necessary (look at Bill Gate or Mark Zuckerberg), but it's a nice place to meet people.
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  • Profile picture of the author BenJackson
    I find myself in a similar situation, finishing my second year of college and I'm waay distracted by IM/SEO. School imho is much easier, less rewarding, and not really an effective means of learning, which is why I spend much less time on it.

    "In school we are taught something and then given a test. In life we are given a test, and then we learn something from it."

    Classrooms are not a natural learning environment and there is no analogy for a pen-and-paper test in real life. You mean this decision is final and I can't consult a coworker or manager??

    I'm taking summer classes so I can graduate sooner, but sometimes I think about taking a semester off and I can't help but feel quite excited at the prospect of the time I would have on my hands to focus on my online business. Personally, I just don't want a chip on my shoulder for not graduating. The funny thing is I'm majoring in entrepreneurship and I've finally got 'Entrepreneurship 101' next semester - I'll be walking into that class with an established business and I'll probably get like a B- because I'm too busy running a business. sigh...
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  • Profile picture of the author Berkinb
    College degree is absolutely not required to do well in IM.

    However, if what you are experiencing is some sort of "the grass is always greener on the other side" thing, you would be doing yourself a disservice by dropping.

    If you can say (with 100% determination) that you don't want to graduate, and that IM is what you want to do, then I'd assume there would be no harm.

    But on the other hand, I see no harm in trying to graduate at the same time either.

    In the end, it is your life. If you need affirmations about what you are going to do, then maybe you should think again. Very carefully.
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    • Profile picture of the author Henry White
      Originally Posted by Berkinb View Post

      College degree is absolutely not required to do well in IM.

      However, if what you are experiencing is some sort of "the grass is always greener on the other side" thing, you would be doing yourself a disservice by dropping.

      If you can say (with 100% determination) that you don't want to graduate, and that IM is what you want to do, then I'd assume there would be no harm.

      But on the other hand, I see no harm in trying to graduate at the same time either.

      In the end, it is your life. If you need affirmations about what you are going to do, then maybe you should think again. Very carefully.
      IMNSHO, most of those who are suddenly interested in going back to college in this dreadful economy will be precisely the ones who will drop out first and go back to work as soon as an attractive job offer comes their way. This crap has been going on since the GI Bill and Pell Grants.
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by Steven Carl Kelly View Post

        I find it interesting that you can find several lists like this, mainly on sites sponsored heavily by companies that want to sell business-related products, services and training.

        Spent a few minutes looking for a list of top 100 entrepreneurs who succeeded with a college degree, with no success. Maybe because such a list would not be news? Or would not support the sponsors' products? :confused:

        If skipping or dropping out of college is such a keystone of later success, why can't I find a list of the lucky few who graduated and still managed to make something of themselves? They, like the truth, have to be out there...
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        • Profile picture of the author paulie888
          Originally Posted by JohnMcCabe View Post

          I find it interesting that you can find several lists like this, mainly on sites sponsored heavily by companies that want to sell business-related products, services and training.

          Spent a few minutes looking for a list of top 100 entrepreneurs who succeeded with a college degree, with no success. Maybe because such a list would not be news? Or would not support the sponsors' products? :confused:

          If skipping or dropping out of college is such a keystone of later success, why can't I find a list of the lucky few who graduated and still managed to make something of themselves? They, like the truth, have to be out there...
          You make a great point there, John. It wouldn't be "sensational" or "shocking" to come up with such a list, and we all know how the mainstream media tends to pander to the lowest common denominator in popular taste.

          This distortion of the truth just makes it seem glamorous and cool to drop out of college for impressionable youths, never mind that they aren't made aware of the miserable failure rate for those who choose to follow an entrepreneurial path.
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      • Profile picture of the author Justin Goff
        BTW, I also agree with most people that college is worthwhile for many other aspects such as social skills, making friends, networking, having the time of your life.

        If you're 18, I'd say go to college and work on your IM stuff instead of getting a part time job. If you're 30 and already in a job, then going back to college really isn't going to help you much (unless you're getting a specific degree for a specific job, such as a nurse)
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  • Profile picture of the author Jay Moreno
    i am a qualified engineer but left engineering almost 10 years ago and make far more money working for myself as a serial entrepreneur than i used to when i was working in engineering, and i used to get really good pay and benefits...

    i certainly work more hours now through choice, but i love love love what i do - but saying that having an education opened a lot of doors for me and feel that it helped me with the mindset i have today

    theoretically it also allows me to have a plan b and fall back in to engineering should the need arise...

    with or without a degree i believe your mindset, drive and foresight will make or break you

    hth

    jay
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    • Profile picture of the author WebPen
      Originally Posted by ukescuba View Post

      i am a qualified engineer but left engineering almost 10 years ago and make far more money working for myself as a serial entrepreneur than i used to when i was working in engineering, and i used to get really good pay and benefits...

      i certainly work more hours now through choice, but i love love love what i do - but saying that having an education opened a lot of doors for me and feel that it helped me with the mindset i have today

      theoretically it also allows me to have a plan b and fall back in to engineering should the need arise...

      with or without a degree i believe your mindset, drive and foresight will make or break you

      hth

      jay

      I'm an engineer too, but I'm miserable at my day job.

      Office politics. The VERY outdated 9-5 work schedule, despite how much work is available. Dumb meetings.

      I hate it.

      The problem is, the point was made earlier that usually people with degrees make money day in and day out. 97% of those in IM don't.

      For a "secure" income, get a degree and do IM on the side for multiple streams of income. At least until they're pretty big and you can do IM full time.
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      • Profile picture of the author Jay Moreno
        Originally Posted by AYoungMillionaire View Post

        I'm an engineer too, but I'm miserable at my day job.

        Office politics. The VERY outdated 9-5 work schedule, despite how much work is available. Dumb meetings.

        I hate it.

        The problem is, the point was made earlier that usually people with degrees make money day in and day out. 97% of those in IM don't.

        For a "secure" income, get a degree and do IM on the side for multiple streams of income. At least until they're pretty big and you can do IM full time.
        i was in the same position - i got burnt out after 10years in engineering same BS regardless of what country i worked or company i worked

        figured the only way to make real money is to work for yourself... i built up a side business that eventually made me more money than my daytime job - one day i literally had the last straw and walked away from engineering forever - i was scared, and anxious but i made it work it does take balls to do but it was amongst the best things i ever did... its certainly not for everyone and i would always recommend never put all your eggs in one basket - always have a fall back plan

        if your miserable in your current job either put up with it or do something about it

        its certainly easier to do when you have less dependents and responsibilities - as a young millionaire said getting an education and doing IM on the side i was say is sound advice, similar if your stuck in a job you hate, build up a secondary income...

        longterm success is not easy and takes hard work and commitment but the rewards can be more than worth it!
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  • Profile picture of the author SEOLady
    Believe me, it is very important but of course not a guarantee...
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  • Profile picture of the author powercomm
    If you have the opportunity to study then a little more time won't hurt, after all you have your whole life ahead of you. The great thing about IM is that you can do it in your spare time and when it suits you. In fact you will probably focus more than some of us 'full-timers' if you have to structure your time more efficiently. Good luck
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  • Profile picture of the author bnwebm
    In my mind and with two degrees, I see a college education as a back up plan and if you had a family to support, i'd tell you to get that education. You don't though and if IM is your passion, no college degree currently exists to feed that. I know a few MBA's and they don't have the slightest internet savvy. It's as if their comprehensive education has provided them all the tools specifically for an in-person, office-based 9 to 5. My own masters degree, in counseling, at least prepared me for IM in terms of making genuine connections with potential clients. Other than that, the degree serves me no purpose except to have an alternative if I had no choice but to get an offline job. I don't see that happening though, since it was ridiculously easy to double my offline income within a year of becoming a full-time IM'er.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jacob Hargreave
    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
    Ah it is indeed rare to see an entrepreneurial fire in youth these days. I can already tell from what you have posted here that you will be a success. I also had the same situation you are currently in, except I quit college (2 years in) all together. It was a brash decision and my parents did not approve but could not argue my logic of wanting a better life for all of us.

    You see I have a small circle of friends all of the college graduates, degrees in nursing, business management, radiology, you name it. Yet only one of them has put that degree to use. The grim truth is once that degree is acquired it's no guarantee that a job will follow. My brother is also a business graduate and he operates a train for a living. Ironically his hobby since he was a boy where trains. He never had an interest in business, it was advice given to him by family. There is a moral to the story here son don't miss it.

    As for advice, I can only give you what I deem to be practical as I don't believe in throwing education away. I would suggest getting into internet marketing courses, it's a skill set that will be invaluable to what you currently have your sights set on and will even qualify you for jobs that few people can fill.

    Make no mistake here son... No form of income is secure or guaranteed. Not even the so called "good jobs", believe me it can be here today and gone tomorrow if you are not careful. The best chance any of us have is to create and control our own income rather than rely on a wage. They both have the same amount con's, but not nearly the same amount of pro's.
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  • Profile picture of the author azhar99
    lol
    All the richest people in the world have no college education.
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  • Profile picture of the author Michael Cole
    If you want to make it in Corporate America then yes, you need several degrees, plus an advanced course in CEO butt kissing.

    If you are planning on being an entrepreneur you need to make a consistent applied effort to educate yourself, then follow through with what you learn, because in the end it's not what you know or how you learned it that matters, it's what you do with it.
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  • Profile picture of the author Angela Marshall
    Speaking from my personal experience, you don't need the college education to be successful. BUT, the experience, connections and networks you will form can be priceless. Not just for monetary gain, but also for guidance and help in the many other things you will experience in life outside of your career.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Justin Goff View Post

      I think you're assuming too much.

      Just because your parents are loaded, doesn't mean you'll be successful. It certainly helps, but that doesn't mean Bill Gates didn't earn what he has.

      Same thing with Zuckerberg... Whether he stole the idea or not, it took him like 3+ years to get Facebook in a spot where people were really taking notice. 99/100 people could have tried the same thing and never gotten anywhere.

      Having an "idea" is about the easiest part of running the business. Actually executing and making your business profitable is the tough part (which is where family money and a big "idea" really don't matter)

      - Justin
      No disrespect intended toward the OP, but i doubt you'd find either Gates or Zuckerberg posting a "what should I do" post on a marketing forum. And, as another poster pointed out, neither dropped out until they saw the potential of a specific idea.

      I would imagine that if you could ask either of them why they dropped out, I doubt the answer would be "I don't like to study" or "I don't like my classes"...
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  • Profile picture of the author RichBeck
    V92,

    I would personally do both. Why not continue to build an IM business and get a Sales or Marketing degree from an inexpensive, online, self-paced and fully accredited university like WGU?

    All the Best,

    Rich
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  • Profile picture of the author celente
    who was it...donald trump (goldfish pouting boy) that said the street smart people are always smarter, but he always hires people with degrees cause it shows commitment. that is what he likes to see over people that havent gone to college.

    While this is a good debate, i think people with experience are far better than those with degrees, that is just a piece of paper, I have one myself. but there are people out there doing very well who quit school in grade 10.
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    • Profile picture of the author paulie888
      Originally Posted by celente View Post

      who was it...donald trump (goldfish pouting boy) that said the street smart people are always smarter, but he always hires people with degrees cause it shows commitment. that is what he likes to see over people that havent gone to college.

      While this is a good debate, i think people with experience are far better than those with degrees, that is just a piece of paper, I have one myself. but there are people out there doing very well who quit school in grade 10.
      Gerald, several posters have made a very valid point that while there are some great success stories of people who either dropped out of college, or never attended at all, for every one of these success stories there are many more untold ones of those who tried going the same route and failed miserably.

      Just because you've made up your mind to become an entrepreneur does not mean you'll succeed. I can assure you that all these college "drop outs" (i.e. Bill Gates, Larry Ellison, Sergey Brin, Larry Page, etc.) did not drop out on a whim, and only decided to do so when they had come to a crossroads in their business which necessitated making this tough call.
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      • Profile picture of the author BenJackson
        Originally Posted by paulie888 View Post

        Gerald, several posters have made a very valid point that while there are some great success stories of people who either dropped out of college, or never attended at all, for every one of these success stories there are many more untold ones of those who tried going the same route and failed miserably.

        Just because you've made up your mind to become an entrepreneur does not mean you'll succeed. I can assure you that all these college "drop outs" (i.e. Bill Gates, Larry Ellison, Sergey Brin, Larry Page, etc.) did not drop out on a whim, and only decided to do so when they had come to a crossroads in their business which necessitated making this tough call.
        So true, you can't just drop out because you're gonna...and you're gonna...You need to be able to say I am doing this, I'm already making it.

        I'm finding myself at these crossroads right now. If things keep going the way they are and I meet my goals this summer I won't be returning for classes in the fall because I simply will not have time for both.

        I don't think that anyone here wants to attempt to devalue the importance of a degree (I don't), but it comes down to what you have time for and what you can accomplish with this time. You don't have to be Mark Zuckerberg (who wants to be that nerd anyway ), but you need to be able to support yourself and position yourself to continue to grow both as a person and as a business.
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    • Profile picture of the author dizen
      Experience VS education, which is more important? IMHO depends..... on what kind of experience you are referring to.


      20 years of exp in flipping burger ... no offense but education is more important.

      20 years of experience in management level... hell yes ...this kind of experience is much more important than college degree,




      While this is a good debate, i think people with experience are far better than those with degrees, that is just a piece of paper, I have one myself. but there are people out there doing very well who quit school in grade 10.[/quote]
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  • Profile picture of the author RamCity
    It is necessary upto some extend to get a Job only. Otherwise knowledge & Education have far more distance with college degree.
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  • Profile picture of the author paintbrush4u
    Can you multi-task....go to school and do IM..?

    Dont let your college keep you from your education.

    I would recommnend to follow you heart but also listen to your mind....
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  • Experience is the best teacher, I am in the exactly same position like you. And now I have found my passion, that is IM
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  • Profile picture of the author sannyboy
    I delayed going to uni until I was 24. I thought that I HAD to get my ass into education again to make more $$.

    The outcome is 2 fold - 1, I completed my degree successfully, with good grades and managed to secure a job with a very prestigious company (in the UK) earning double what I earned before uni. 2, I have become increasingly reliant on that same company keeping me in my current lifestyle - my choices became dictated by my employer.

    College/uni is great - don't let anyone tell you otherwise. It develops your own self. After that experience, you are on your own. Choose a job (like I mistakenly did), or choose what you have learned to become successful in your own right.

    Given the choice again, I would still go to university, but studying something that I enjoy. I don't think you can replicate the experience - especially if you an afford it. But I would not EVER enter the corporate world. It has compromised everything I have wanted to actually DO with my life for 6 years.

    Things have recently changed for me, but I cannot regain those years sat behind a desk, answering to a tyrant of a boss who decides how many holidays I am allowed to take each year.

    Anyway, if you get good at the internet stuff, you can pay your way through college, get the experiences and still come out doing something you want to do. HAVE IT ALL - don't let people tell you that it is one thing or another ;-)

    Good luck

    San
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  • Profile picture of the author Andy Kobe
    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
    Nope, it's not. I hated school and as an adult (in my 40s), I'm glad that
    I went the route that I did.

    BUT, my kids are going to college
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  • Profile picture of the author pmbrent
    Since you only have one year left, you mind as well finish your degree out. But your in the right mind set as far as making your own money is concerned. Because you will graduate college with more debt then a job will pay you in annual salary.
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  • Profile picture of the author SeoGigs
    Havent you ever heard the saying "A and B students work for C and D students"

    I have a degree and ended up never working a day in the field i studied, unless you want to count an internship.

    I will say this however, if you want to be in IM take some classes related to IM. They dont have to be college classes either, for example look where you can get certified in stuff like Dreamweaver and Photoshop, or PHP programing, Windows Server ect that type of stuff will come in handy and later you can find lots of places to sell freelance work.
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  • Profile picture of the author SB274
    A college degree isn't necessary if you want to pursue IM. While certain things you might learn in college might help you along the way, I would have to say that I learned more in my first 3 months of Internet Marketing than I did in the first 2 years of college. Just my two cents.
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  • Profile picture of the author SB274
    Signature
    "Make it so today is not like yesterday, and tomorrow will be different forever." -Anthony Robbins
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  • Profile picture of the author newmovies
    Banned
    Just found a pretty nice article

    A College Degree is Nearly a NecessityLARGE ARTICLE
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  • Profile picture of the author maxx12
    good question)))
    I think it is sort of backup..definitely should have one..
    by the way a purpose of learning (obtaining a degree in the end) is to make your brain work!
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  • Profile picture of the author Anthony W
    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
    Kind of in the same boat. Except I'm 22 and graduating in 2 weeks. I went through a phase where I knew I could succeed in IM if I put in time and couldn't care less about getting my undergraduate degree in chemistry.

    People will tell you that a college degree = job security, which is true to some extent. But in this day and age, I don't think any job is 100% secure.

    And personally, I value my own time and freedom above all else and just can't work a 9-5 everyday.

    I felt like academics were a huge waste of my time. I had no interest in my major and every exam I spent studying for, I could have been building backlinks to my website That said, I still decided to finish college because...

    1.Even if you don't give a **** about the academics, there's an entire 'college experience' you get out of it- meeting new people, partying, doing pretty much whatever you want socially without THAT BIG of repercussions. Things you'll never get to experience outside of college

    2. Being disciplined to finish what I start. Some people may not agree with me on this, especially those who always advocate 'just follow your passion'. But I have a tendency of quitting things I start.

    If I quit college, how can I trust myself to ever finish anything else when the going gets tough? There's actually a correlation between not finishing college and higher divorce rates.

    So part of the reason I decided to stick through with it was because I wanted to prove to myself that I can work hard and get a degree.

    3. Parents- my dad really values academic success. I really wanted to make him proud.

    Sorry this post is so long and if I'm rambling. My advice to you would be to take the courses YOU LIKE and do what you want to do. Use college as an opportunity to try new things, drink too much beer and meet new people
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  • Profile picture of the author highave1
    Hello, you are looking for a reach man; there does not mean to you should have a degree from colleges. you're in right place..go ahead
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  • Profile picture of the author Berkinb
    I, like many others, said that college education is not required for success in IM. However, seeing some posts suggesting that college education is somehow a "barrier" to success makes little sense.
    In the end, life is simple. You take every advantage you can put your hands on. College education is an advantage (at least as a backup plan as a fellow warrior said). Yes, you don't need it, but no, it cannot hurt you.
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  • Profile picture of the author Damien Roche
    A college degree is good for two things:

    1. getting a head-start in the rat race
    2. rejoining the rat race if your IM business goes tits up

    I don't have a college degree. I am educated to an NVQ Lv2 in Business Admin and I am so sorry I didn't go to college. One side, it forces me to be self-employed because after you've experienced a large influx of money over 1 day, it's almost impossible to go back to work knowing what you're missing.

    The other side, when you're backed into a corner and disaster strikes you have NO career because you don't have the required qualifications.

    Do yourself a favour. Get the qualifications and education you need to start a career, and at the same time work on your online business.
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    • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
      Originally Posted by Andy Kobe View Post

      Nope, it's not. I hated school and as an adult (in my 40s), I'm glad that
      I went the route that I did.

      BUT, my kids are going to college
      Excellent point. I wonder how many offspring of those on the various "dropped out and got rich" lists will have college degrees?

      Even for the ones who don't make the lists, how many self-made success stories value college for their kids?

      Originally Posted by SeoGigs View Post

      Havent you ever heard the saying "A and B students work for C and D students"
      Parroted mostly by C and D students. Or by people with a commercial interest in diverting that college fund to their business opportunity.
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  • Profile picture of the author hueyliew
    I definitely wants my children to get into University but for the course they love to do ... big 5 no-no profession in no particular order are doctor, accountant, architect, engin33r or lawyer ... generally these profession will lead them into a life of a bucket carrier, read “The Parable of the Pipeline” By Burke Hedges.

    Agreed with Damian and many of the previous posts, a uni or college degree will provide you with the life experiences and resources that you will appreciate later on in your life.
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  • Profile picture of the author palmer9999
    Here I was thinking I was the first person replying in this thread! lol

    Well I wouldnt stay in your course if I was you! I did the same thing as you pretty much.
    Did one year in software development and Computer networking, failed switched to Information technology support passed first year.

    Went into second year of ITS, failed that, repeated failed again!!!!! (just one module by 1%)
    Went back this year repeated the module. After these 4/5 years in college I now have a higher certificate in information technology support! lol.

    Started college when I was 19 now 24.. It wasn't as if I didnt want to pass I was just wasn't to bothered!

    Now I have the option of going into 3rd year getting my degree. So what I am doing is travelling for the next year!!

    My advice would be if you fail leave college or change course's!!!
    Or maybe college is just not for me ha.

    Also half the billionaires in the world left college!!!!
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    • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
      Originally Posted by palmer9999 View Post

      Also half the billionaires in the world left college!!!!

      And many of them later regretted it.

      There's plenty of money and opportunity to make it. But
      later on you may not always be able to attend college. Your
      various responsibilities can sometimes make it too difficult, and
      it's easy to just let it go.

      A person can forever enrich their mind and life and also have fun
      in the process.

      It's the kind of ROI that cannot be approached in the usual way
      because some of the variables are intangible.


      Ken
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      • Profile picture of the author JohnMcCabe
        Originally Posted by palmer9999 View Post

        Also half the billionaires in the world left college!!!!
        Most of them clutching their hard-won degrees in hand...
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  • Profile picture of the author RogerAderholdt
    I prefer a degree in LIFE experiences. We meet people your age all over the world traveling and meeting new people that opens up a world of opportunities.

    After having hired 1,000's of employees over the years... I much rather have someone with common sense any day of the week than someone with a Doctor Degree and can't figure out how to sharpen the Damn Pencil.

    If you NEED to go to college... think Doctor or Nurse then yes you should go. If you are going just to get a piece of paper so you can say hey look at me I have a Degree... save your $100,000 and go to work doing something you love to do.

    Life is to short to spend 4 years doing something you HATE.
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  • Profile picture of the author Jake Gray
    Been watching this thread for a few days now.

    Here's my take: If you are wanting to have a back-up
    incase your business goes sour, then it wouldn't hurt to
    have. Now most people who are marketing big, high-end
    products often have a college degree. A lot of things can
    be learned for free, but it's still a good thing to have.
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  • Profile picture of the author sprks79
    Like many have said, a degree is not a must, however it couldnt hurt could it. Maybe try to get a degree at your leisure, part time, if that's what you really want.
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  • Profile picture of the author palmer9999
    College good but u should only do have of it
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  • Profile picture of the author pheonix44
    I have about half of an associates, but I did not finish it. I plan on going back to get it for my own reasons and then get a bachelors. I honestly feel that a degree is not as valuable as it used to be in terms of it making you alot of money. Alot of people go to school for degrees that are not specialized like liberal arts, political science, communication, etc.

    I feel like a degree will ensure you are always able to get at least a low end white collar job. Even though degrees may have lost some of their earning power they still carry one powerful value point, and after reading some of the posts in this thread it is obvious. The value a degree carries is social proof or social respectability.

    There are some people that no matter how much you out earn them will feel like they have an edge over you and will be respected more socially because of that degree. The argument that you will always have it to fall back on does not make sense either and that backs up my statement of it having high social respectability value.

    In 10 years or 20 years if you need the degree the people getting out of college at that moment will have the same degree with updated skills. Companies will be able to pay these kids half of what they are paying anyone with it now except for those at the highest levels that are hard to replace.

    If you do not have a highly specialized degree and consistently update your skills then you are losing your edge by the day, no matter how much experience you might have in a given field unless you are at the top of it. I say go to school and get the degree.

    Do it for the experience, which is where most of the value for people is (dating, parties, on campus clubs, etc) and do it for the social proof/social respectability that you might not get otherwise, even if you make hundreds of millions of dollars.

    If you don't and you become ultra successful you may still be looked down on by those who earn 30.000$ to 50.000$ a year who have a need to feel superior to you in some area because you out earn them by so much. Your lack of a degree will be the focal point for them.
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  • Profile picture of the author tbsweet52
    Is a college degree necessary for a stable backup plan in case your IM plans don't work? YES
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  • Profile picture of the author BizBest
    Education will always be important though sometimes there are some good exemptions to this rule...
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    • Profile picture of the author V92
      Thanks everyone for the replies, I feel that right now since I am on summer I am going to focus on IM and if I continue to do well in it,I will consider if going to college is really necessary for me.
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      • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
        Originally Posted by V92 View Post

        I will consider if going to college is really necessary for me.

        Now that we've come full circle...

        Bon chance!




        Ken
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        • Profile picture of the author knt333
          NO!

          They only thing the teachers do is read from the book. Just buy the book and read it yourself and save yourself 60k in school debt.

          College is good for networking, but I wouldn't pay 60k to network with anybody either. Hah

          Where I live, we have UCLA Extensions! Its perfect because you only have to pay maybe $1000-$2000 for a 8 week Business course that's ON CAMPUS, and its usually filled with people who already own businesses. Business owners and execs go there often refresh their skills. These are the type of people worth networking with.
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      • Profile picture of the author paulie888
        Originally Posted by V92 View Post

        Thanks everyone for the replies, I feel that right now since I am on summer I am going to focus on IM and if I continue to do well in it,I will consider if going to college is really necessary for me.
        That's a much more level-headed approach to take - make sure you're at least making a consistent and full-time income from IM before ever considering dropping out of college.
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        • Profile picture of the author myob
          Going to college is a decision you will never regret. As so many have indicated, the benefits of a degree are somewhat of an intangible enrichment. And some have dismissed its value for that very reason. On a more practical side, however, it is becoming more essential in an increasingly competitive marketplace to have a degree.

          In my business, I have university students working as writers and researchers for my projects. Most of them are facing this very common dilemma. Studying is so hard, and it would be so easy to drop out for either lucrative job offers or the easy money opportunities.

          Understandably, this manner of short-range thinking is very difficult to resist without having a larger perspective. This seductive Siren song of quick and easy money is irrestible, but as in Homer's "Odyssey", the way to get past it is to plug your ears and hold on to the sailing mast on the journey to complete your education. The derelicts of dashed opportunities far outnumber the relatively few who do succeed without an education.

          In my own experience, doors are opened for lucrative projects that are based much more on my "credentials" than on any of my true abilities. That's why I have to hire writers.
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          • Profile picture of the author rama
            Originally Posted by myob View Post

            Going to college is a decision you will never regret. As so many have indicated, the benefits of a degree are somewhat of an intangible enrichment. And some have dismissed its value for that very reason. On a more practical side, however, it is becoming more essential in an increasingly competitive marketplace to have a degree.

            In my business, I have university students working as writers and researchers for my projects. Most of them are facing this very common dilemma. Studying is so hard, and it would be so easy to drop out for either lucrative job offers or the easy money opportunities.

            Understandably, this manner of short-range thinking is very difficult to resist without having a larger perspective. This seductive Siren song of quick and easy money is irrestible, but as in Homer's "Odyssey", the way to get past it is to plug your ears and hold on to the sailing mast on the journey to complete your education. The derelicts of dashed opportunities far outnumber the relatively few who do succeed without an education.

            In my own experience, doors are opened for lucrative projects that are based much more on my "credentials" than on any of my true abilities. That's why I have to hire writers.
            I totally totally agree with you. Your college degree is your investment.
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  • Profile picture of the author Vera10
    Finishing education is still very important...because you can use it as a reliable fall back...
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  • Profile picture of the author knt333
    Another Note,

    If you have the extra money to actually pay for college, then of course!!

    But if going to college requires you to take out a bunch of student loans then NO. Most college graduates only make about 35k/year...if they can even find a job.

    You can get a Real Estate License and sell 3 houses to make 35k. A Real Estate License will only run a couple hundred bucks. Also, if you plan on running a business, most the information you learn from your professor will most likely be useless.

    The only thing a school teacher can teach is "how to become a school teacher." If you want to learn how to run and operate a successful business, then you need to learn from somebody who's doing exactly that. Just my opinion.
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    • Originally Posted by knt333 View Post

      Most college graduates only make about 35k/year...
      This is indeed the sad truth of the current state of university graduates: they're paid peanuts because academic knowledge/labor has become cheap to outsource. Everyone and their mother goes to college, and thus employers can push down salaries due to over supply of graduated work force, to say nothing about the booming unemployment rates in that sector. It takes graduates like 10 years of cheap labor before they start going up the corporate ladder and start seeing a decent salary.

      I repeat: education is no longer an efficient way to wealth!

      Here's my story:

      Like I said on a previous post, I graduated in Business. I learned NOTHING useful or remotely linked to the real business world out there, but that a whole different discussion...

      Anyway, I graduated and worked in the corporate scene for 4 years, being paid $35k'ish and working my butt silly till the wee hour... Believe it or not, a friend of mine who was a plumber was earning WAY more money than me with his small family business... and he didnt have to study for 5 years... and he didnt have to kiss and boss' @$$...

      Eventually, in my late 20s, I said "enough is enough. This just doesn't make any sense!", and quit my corporate job to travel the world (ticked) and to seek my own entrepreneurial ventures (ticked)...

      Now, quite a few years later, I wish I had never wasted those years studying outdated and 100% theoretical lessons, and working around the clock to make someone else rich. I'm glad though that, once I saw the light, I circumnavigated the world, learned languages (English is not my first language) and became a millionaire...

      So, to answer your question: do you need a university degree? I personally failed to make any good enough use of it to justify the effort. Sure I partied like a rock star back then, but you don't need to go to college for that. Sure I met some of my best friends ever, but again you dont need to go to college for that. And sure I raided a bed or two, but you CERTAINLY dont need to go to college for that :p

      So, what's left then? oh, yes: there's the $35,000/year salary for the first 5 years as a post-graduate...
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      • Profile picture of the author KenThompson
        Originally Posted by Anonymous Affiliate View Post

        I repeat: education is no longer an efficient way to wealth!

        I think people were misinformed if they ever thought that in the first
        place.


        Ken
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  • Profile picture of the author journey7
    I say do what you want to do, and take the necessary steps to get there!

    If that means college is necessary, go for it. If not, forget about it!

    But make sure you have a plan and a direction! In order to reach the end of your path, you must be focused on exactly that is!

    If you fail, you will know you tried your hardest to succeed, and you can be proud about that.

    If you succeed, then congratulations!!!
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  • Profile picture of the author Luis Gabriel
    I quit school! I find it a waste of time (In the end we just learn how to become buyers)... I decided to focus 100% on internet marketing

    Luis Gabriel

    P.s: But that's just me. If you want to finish school, go for it
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    • Profile picture of the author gingerlyspicy
      wow quite a long thread didnt read all though except the first page ...this thought crosses my mind atleast 10 times a day but so far i m trying to manage as i m a newbie and havent tasted online success so much as people have on this forum so there is no point for me quiting my university although deep down my heart i know i m gonna quit it one day or the other maybe in a year or so because engineering sucks and i m not the one made to enginerering :rolleyes:...the tuffest part would be convincing my parents

      maybe u can try some part time course or something.....atleast have the degree
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  • Profile picture of the author calfred
    Haha V92,

    PLEASE READ EVERY WORD HERE CAREFULLY AS EVERYTHING WAS REAL AND RECALLED AS THEY ARE

    I faced the exact same situation as where you are in now.

    You and I are the same.

    There's no better advice than to listen to other people's stories and then deciding upon your own mind.

    I was 18 years old too. I had done my A level (pre U, foundation, or whatever you call its equivalent) for Engineering...

    I was then left to choose whether I want to pursue my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering or not.

    BUT

    The only difference between you and me is I did straight up hardcore direct sales for about 1 year.

    SO

    I had 2 choices.

    I was left to choose between going full time in direct sales (I wasn't making much but I saw the light in this path [doing business and the entire self improvement thing]. It was my passion I guess. Still, know that the motivation to run away from something is GREATER than the motivation to achieve something. This is human nature)

    OR

    Proceed with Mechanical Engineering degree, which takes 4 years and a RM50,000 loan, which is pretty huge. Cause buying a house here could already cost RM100,000 - RM400,000. Just to paint a picture of the currency. For extra reference, please go to Cost of Living (what an excellent site).

    WHAT I DID

    Back then, I was 50/50 like you (I'm judging by the way you sound here in this thread). I clearly did not know which path to tread on.

    I went to every lecturer's room (about 10 of them) randomly and asked them this important life question: "should I continue university?". And accumulating about 20 hours of talk time in total, the answer is of course yes. They're freaking lecturers @ the 1st place!

    Surprisingly, most of them gave me some solid advice which I did not know earlier.

    4 YEARS LATER

    Here I am, having graduated with Mechanical Engineering.


    LESSONS LEARNED

    I was glad I pulled through although I did not quite enjoy the multitude of theories in Engineering. But here I am today (24 years old), proud enough to tell people that I have a Mechanical Eng. degree.

    I don't know how to judge whether an Engineering or an Arts degree is more "important", but to me the entire university life and environment was like a testing ground.

    Testing ground for what?

    - to truly discover yourself (boy oh boy, I truly discovered a lot about myself, strengths and weaknesses, like really to the core. Why know this? So that you can leverage your best skill and produce the best results)

    - skills to socialize with people (think of university as the 'lite' version of the working environment in future). You can basically do whatever you want and learn a lot from your mistakes. Don't do mistakes in the working environment. It's costly

    - to form bonds with CEOs of the future (I hi byed to a TON of people back then. I basically knew everyone although I was not close to them). Now that I've graduated, I simply made some calls and most of them (95%) were wiling to help me get a job at a big, reputable company. Boy oh boy, you'd be surprised knowing that just by knowing people here and there, you could make big connections. Trust me on this one. I've tried it

    - develop a good work ethic (here's my advice for you. Don't follow the crowd and give in easily and slack away. It's as equally as being dead. Always fight for everything. Homework? Ok, do it. Exam? Ok, study hard for it. The whole point is to give your best. Dude, we only have got one life, do you want to do things 50/50 and let life get by you? I don't know about you, but I don't

    PS: You have to understand that in whatever I do, I do it best. But honestly, I'm not perfect. I do procrastinate sometimes (who the hell doesn't?). However, you really have to understand that I absolutely dislike sleeping and eating because I think they're time wasters. Well, just to reflect that I really have this mindset whereby I constantly want to do the best all the time. So I'm far from the typical bum you know of. I really can't understand why bums are the way they are. It's like being a zombie.

    PS: If I were you, I'd just stick to college and enjoy the best years of my life 1st if you're still undecided. Boy oh boy, I had a lot of fun. Ever heard about sarging?

    PSSS: Unless you have like only 10 years more to live (cause you have cancer or something), then stay in school! You learn a hell lot more things in life (everyone just seems to be focusing on the academics). And remember, you're only young once. And you only have the chance to attend college once when you're young. Think about it.


    Calfred
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  • Profile picture of the author noangel
    We were having this discussion over dinner last night funnily enough.

    Let me preface this by saying that no education is ever wasted and the
    experience and knowledge gained from a university degree is priceless.
    I loved every minute I spend on campus.

    However, Universities do tend to shape you to work in the corporate field,
    usually as an employee, in a large firm, or institution. Bear in mind, I am
    saying usually and not always.

    What is lacking is a course that teaches one to be a free thinking entrepreneur.
    Instead of teaching one to learn and think in a way that prepares one for the
    corporate world.

    That could be why so many huge successes have not received university degrees
    because they tap into that free thinking.

    I am not sure if I am expressing this very well, but having said all this, I still believe
    a university education is something not to be missed, but at the same time, keep
    open the channels of free thinking and entrepreneurship.

    Angela
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  • Profile picture of the author derox
    Education is meant to enlighten you, a college degree is usually a plus in some areas but basic education works well for other people.
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  • Profile picture of the author shireen
    Hi:

    Shireen here :-)

    I can't tell you what to do but I can share some of my experience.

    I was a university lecturer. I have a master degree in economics, but I don't really like to work for other people.

    I quit my job last year and go full time online.

    My master degree don't really help my online business :-)

    Hope it helps...
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  • Profile picture of the author Marhelper
    No but it sure does not hurt.
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  • Profile picture of the author tyang
    If you're making enough to live by now then you prob. should focus your efforts on IM, if not you should get that college degree as a backup plan
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  • Profile picture of the author Cigar2010
    Business Sucess is important but not all the meaning of life..
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  • Profile picture of the author Zanti
    What a very interesting thread along with the varying degrees of thoughts on the subject.

    I was fortunate to receive my undergrad degree from Grand Valley State University, in Michigan. Although back when I attended in the mid 70's it was known as Grand Valley State College. I was part of the last group of what I'll call the hippie generation. I remember very well, sex, drugs and rock-n-roll, as well as Vietnam, Woodstock and civil rights marches.

    Grand Valley at the time was considered a pioneer and at the forefront of advanced educational learning. A cluster college, comprised of several colleges: the College of Arts and Science, (CAS), the traditional college; William James College (WJC), a more real world experience college, modeled after the works of 19th century American philosopher William James; Thomas Jefferson College, (TJC), what we called the real hippie college back then, the experiential college of general studies; and College IV, a self-directed, self-paced curriculum of modules, units of study or blocks of material that broke courses into conceptual chunks. Kind of like what's seen in IM courses today.

    I attended both William James and CAS, receiving a degree with a double major in Arts & Media, (film, video & photography) and Business Management with a minor in Advertising and Public Relations. I don't mind dating myself here, back when I started doing video the only video cassette was one inch professional broadcast. VHS or Sony Beta was not invented yet. We had to thread half inch tape on the video recording deck. My how times have changed, I so love screenflow. And yes, I had to walk 3 miles up hill in 3 feet of snow to get to class.

    CAS was and would still be considered a traditional college experience, with typical college professors. William James was very nontraditional. The instructors of WJC were not known as Professor Jones, or Professor Green, but rather as Bob, Michelle, or Adrian. Every WJC instructor was teaching a subject which they were making their living from. It wasn't about theory from a book but real world experience of what worked and didn't, from those who were living what they were teaching.

    The critical aspect of what was taught in WJC was that you were taught to think and to think outside the box. A rare concept from what I gather in universities today. So my experience was not about going to college to get a good job with Ford, GM or some other major corporation, organization or institution. But rather, leaning how to create your own way in the world doing what you loved to do .

    When I first started college I thought I wanted to be a clinical psychologist, because I didn't know that I could pursue what I loved, making visual art in the form of photography, video and film. I had had a camera in my hands since the age of 7 but never really thought about making that my career.

    I learned my art and the other areas that I felt I needed to know to start my own business in visual media; business management, advertising and public relations. I went on to produce and direct in film and TV, act, work as a freelance photographer, test driver for general motors, several years on the staff of a U.S. Senator, regional director of a small business development center, university instructor, management consultant, GS 15 with the federal government and finally full circle with IM today, doing what I love.

    It's important to understand that I'm a product of a mother who was a professional and received a college education and a father who only finished the 8th grade but was a very successful businessman.

    So why am I sharing all of this? Hopefully to be of some help, but to also express that the decision to attend college is an individual one. I don't think it's a right way or wrong way. It's based on what works for each person. It worked for me and opened me up to a diverse world of thoughts and ideas that I may not have encountered without going to college. Who knows.

    What I do know is, I know people from both sides of the aisle. Those that are successful millionaires with lots of letters behind their name and those who are equally successful with only a high school diploma.

    What I would encourage anyone to do, is to give college a try, not because you want to get a good job but because you have a desire to learn more about something that you love.

    The college experience in my opinion, is really about personal growth, expanded self-awareness, critical thinking and deductive reasoning which can lead one to excel, exceed and go beyond expectations. Can one achieve these things through another modality, absolutely. It all depends on the person and what one desires.

    A big thanks to my old college adviser and film maker, Michelle Citron, who helped me to think outside the box.

    Go Lakers.

    Brian

    P.S. Oh, I guess I should share before anyone may want to attend WJC, it no longer exist. Grand Valley surrendered to the pressure of big money and corporate interest and is now a leading university of traditional higher leaning, imo.
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  • Profile picture of the author readyngo
    "Life for most people is about keeping their options open and doing what you love while making money." I couldn't agree more!
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  • Profile picture of the author Geoff1
    A college degree is only necessary if you believe it is.

    Geoff
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  • Profile picture of the author Josh Anderson
    Ask Bill Gates or Matt Zuckerberg both are billionairs... both dropped out of college...

    BUT WAIT...

    They dropped out of college to persue what became multi billion dollar businesses and ideas that had the potential to make them among the richest people in the world.

    They dropped out when they had the ideas, skills, and resources around them that allowed them to pursue goals and business plans.

    My advice to you is to stay in school... get some practical training... if you want to be in IM study things like information systems, business management, web design, and programming... you don't have to become an expert in any of those areas but getting training in those areas can help you generate ideas, meet other talented people, and get basic communication skills and other knowledge that will help you in your business.

    Will you use most of what you learn?

    No.

    But until you have a clear picture stay in School.

    Work on your business while you are in School... develop it... and if you hit it big and School is in the way of you achieving specific goals then move on...

    My friend Russell Brunson used to tell me how much he wanted to quit school... he was already running a successful business. His professors drove him nuts sometimes because some things they taught were just plain useless...

    He kept going to school because he loved to wrestle and he had to keep his gradepoint up to stay on the team.

    He graduated from college... his gradepoint was not the best but he was a nationally ranked college wrestler and had built credibility in the wrestling world because of his college participation. He leveraged that into building a team of Olympic hopefuls and hiring one of the best wrestling coaches to help his team.

    There are many reasons to go to school...

    I met my wife there ;-)

    I graduated with a two year degree after attending 4 colleges and 2 universities. I dropped out of high school in 9th grade and never graduated. But I went to college off and on for years... even when I was homeless.

    I did not have a lot of direction (hense the 2 year degree even though I had enough credits for a masters degree) and took every class I was interested in constantly switching my major (which is why I was not able to get a 4 year degree). During my last stint at college I was starting my internet business... I kept switching my major and taking classes that helped me in my persuit of business development on the web.

    While I do not use a lot of the general education I picked up in all those years of school I did get a foundation of knowledge that helps me every day in my business.

    You may already have that knowledge, you may be a genius, but for me...

    Well I was a homeless transient for a good part of a decade. I got my first Windows PC and connected from the internet for the first time in 2001 when I went back to school. I took basic classes to learn everything... and eventually studied accounting, economics, business management, web design, and basic programming.

    The only reason I graduated with a two year degree was because it was the only thing I could get since I could not apply most of my credits from liberal arts schools to my final program.

    Otherwise I would have dropped out... but I too had definate goals, two established businesses, solid direction, unwavering confidence, and money coming in.

    All right... I will stop rambling...

    I admire your drive and entrepreneurial spirit...

    Don't drop out... at least not too soon.

    It was not until I was 27 that I returned to school and began to discover what I wanted to be when I grew up


    Originally Posted by V92 View Post

    Hi, guys I am 18years old and I have just finished my first year of college and I am doing an associates of arts degree taking business and sociology courses and I feel that college just isn't for me. I have no interest in studying in college and I do not want to be working a day job in the future. I have been focusing on IM for 7 months now and I want to make it a business. Has anyone been in the same position as me or does anyone know what I should do?
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